Team Equinety Podcast https://www.teamequinety.com Equinety customers just like you sharing their Equinety Story – Helping Horses Worldwide! Tue, 04 Aug 2020 18:14:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.2 Tune in as we discuss Equinety and how it's benefiting SO many horses. Whether it's a Performance Horse, Pasture ornaments, Rescue, Dressage, Jumping, Eventing, Barrel Racing, Driving, Cowboy Mounted Shooting, Trail Riding, Endurance, Racing Horses or just a hobby... Equinety can HELP your horse in so many ways! We have special guests that talk about their journey and how Equinety has changed the way they do things with their horse! Listen and share YOUR Equinety Story! John Dowdy clean episodic John Dowdy john@teamequinety.com john@teamequinety.com (John Dowdy) 2019 Equinety Customers Sharing Their Equinety Stories! Team Equinety Podcast https://teamequinety.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/EQ-Podcast-Cover-Pic-iTunes-1.jpg https://www.teamequinety.com 059 – Rachel Cleary & Sam Anthrope – Horse Rehab – Equinety accelerates healing process – Suspensory – flexor tendon – Navicular – Mystery Lameness and more https://www.teamequinety.com/059-rachel-cleary-sam-anthrope-horse-rehab-equinety-accelerates-healing-process-suspensory-flexor-tendon-navicular-mystery-lameness-and-more/ Wed, 15 Apr 2020 13:00:08 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1935 Rachel Cleary & Sam Anthrope – Horse Rehab - Equinety accelerates healing process - Suspensory – flexor tendon – Navicular – Mystery Lameness and more   John Dowdy: Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. This is a special one although I think every week is special but we're going to swing up into Indiana and we've got Rachel Cleary on the line now. Her background is rehabbing horses that come from well one end of the spectrum to the other and we'll get into that but what's unique about this particular podcast is she drug on one of her friends and boarders that's going to talk about her horse and how she found Equinety. So Rachel Cleary and Sam Anthrop welcome to the Equinety podcast. Rachel Cleary: Hi, thanks for having us. Samantha Anthrope: Hi, thank you. John Dowdy: Oh you bet. We're excited to have you. So let's get right into this. Rachel, let's start off with just talking a little bit about the work that you do with rehabbing horses and where do they come from, what kind of stuff do you typically deal with, how long you've been doing it, that kind of stuff. Rachel Cleary: Well we have been doing rehab really my whole life that I can remember. We've always gotten horses that have been in bad conditions and rehabbed them weight ways and health ways to get them to get show homes and things like that. We started doing physical rehabilitation about eight years ago. A certified massage therapist, rehab therapist among a million other things here. But we really do a lot of sports injuries and weight issues, elderly horses, things like that. So, a lot of extreme cases come in as far as pain or just in your general killer pin type courses that have been abused so not just weight gain but physical rehabilitation. John Dowdy: Yeah, so we can be talking from something very I mean like a weight gain type of thing which nutrition and some exercising things to very severe like we've got to have the professional team because I mean you do work with, well tell us about the team that you work with. Rachel Cleary: Absolutely. I have an awesome team. I have a veterinarian that is one of which is our, we call her our emergency onsite farrier, Chris Chapel. She lives about 10 miles from us so she can get to the barn pronto. She is always got eyes on our horses. We have a corrective farrier, Dan Woody, who's also an RVT who does all of our balancing with the hoofs. And then we work with Dr Davern from Centaur Equine Specialty Hospital in Shelbyville, Indiana. He is a surgeon and he takes all of our extreme cases and helps us with these really tough journeys so we have a great team. John Dowdy: Yeah, that's incredible. Now let's talk about now you've been doing this for a long time and you've been using the Equinety product for about how long? Rachel Cleary: Since July of 2017 so this will be going on our third year so about two and a half years with the product. John Dowdy: And I think it's important because the reason I asked you that question is since you've been doing rehab work that brings all kinds of challenges to the table you didn't have Equinety. You've only been using it for two and a half years. So what is the biggest thing that you've noticed since adding Equinety to your program? Rachel Cleary: How fast this product accelerates everything that we do from weight gain to muscle gain, to the healing processes of physical wounds, flesh wounds, cuts like that, and internal wounds as far as suspensory injuries and torn muscles and things like that. We've been doing it a long time and rehab's tough and every horse is different. And even with the weight gain issues you're not just targeting one thing. A lot of times where we have to treat ulcers or absorption issues, we are dealing with lameness issues and all of this while we are trying to bring that horse back to life with nutrients. So this product is helping in all of those areas.

Rachel Cleary & Sam Anthrope – Horse Rehab – Equinety accelerates healing process – Suspensory – flexor tendon – Navicular – Mystery Lameness and more

 

John Dowdy:

Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. This is a special one although I think every week is special but we’re going to swing up into Indiana and we’ve got Rachel Cleary on the line now. Her background is rehabbing horses that come from well one end of the spectrum to the other and we’ll get into that but what’s unique about this particular podcast is she drug on one of her friends and boarders that’s going to talk about her horse and how she found Equinety. So Rachel Cleary and Sam Anthrop welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Rachel Cleary:

Hi, thanks for having us.

Samantha Anthrope:

Hi, thank you.

John Dowdy:

Oh you bet. We’re excited to have you. So let’s get right into this. Rachel, let’s start off with just talking a little bit about the work that you do with rehabbing horses and where do they come from, what kind of stuff do you typically deal with, how long you’ve been doing it, that kind of stuff.

Rachel Cleary:

Well we have been doing rehab really my whole life that I can remember. We’ve always gotten horses that have been in bad conditions and rehabbed them weight ways and health ways to get them to get show homes and things like that. We started doing physical rehabilitation about eight years ago. A certified massage therapist, rehab therapist among a million other things here. But we really do a lot of sports injuries and weight issues, elderly horses, things like that. So, a lot of extreme cases come in as far as pain or just in your general killer pin type courses that have been abused so not just weight gain but physical rehabilitation.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, so we can be talking from something very I mean like a weight gain type of thing which nutrition and some exercising things to very severe like we’ve got to have the professional team because I mean you do work with, well tell us about the team that you work with.

Rachel Cleary:

Absolutely. I have an awesome team. I have a veterinarian that is one of which is our, we call her our emergency onsite farrier, Chris Chapel. She lives about 10 miles from us so she can get to the barn pronto. She is always got eyes on our horses. We have a corrective farrier, Dan Woody, who’s also an RVT who does all of our balancing with the hoofs. And then we work with Dr Davern from Centaur Equine Specialty Hospital in Shelbyville, Indiana. He is a surgeon and he takes all of our extreme cases and helps us with these really tough journeys so we have a great team.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, that’s incredible. Now let’s talk about now you’ve been doing this for a long time and you’ve been using the Equinety product for about how long?

Rachel Cleary:

Since July of 2017 so this will be going on our third year so about two and a half years with the product.

John Dowdy:

And I think it’s important because the reason I asked you that question is since you’ve been doing rehab work that brings all kinds of challenges to the table you didn’t have Equinety. You’ve only been using it for two and a half years. So what is the biggest thing that you’ve noticed since adding Equinety to your program?

Rachel Cleary:

How fast this product accelerates everything that we do from weight gain to muscle gain, to the healing processes of physical wounds, flesh wounds, cuts like that, and internal wounds as far as suspensory injuries and torn muscles and things like that. We’ve been doing it a long time and rehab’s tough and every horse is different. And even with the weight gain issues you’re not just targeting one thing. A lot of times where we have to treat ulcers or absorption issues, we are dealing with lameness issues and all of this while we are trying to bring that horse back to life with nutrients. So this product is helping in all of those areas. There’s a lot less products, I really use Equinety and one other along with our feed program and other than the physical rehab and extras that we have to use from our vets we’re not having to use as much and it’s really made a difference. There’s no comparison without it as far as the speed especially on the easier weight gain issues I mean that’s fast now. The 30 day turnaround is unbelievable.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, and I think before we get into, we’re going to be talking about five different cases here, although you have a lot more than that but due to time constraints we’ll keep it to five and maybe we could do another podcast down the road. But if you’re tuning in for the first time maybe you’ve been seeing the Equinety ads and maybe some friends are talking about Equinety or you’re just saying, “Hey, what exactly is this stuff?” The Equinety horse excel is 100% pure amino acids. There’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches, and there’s no loading dose. A serving size is 5.2 grams which is just shy of a tablespoon. But ultimately what this product is doing is it’s giving the body what it needs to release its own hormones that help the body heal at a cellular level.

John Dowdy:

So in this case we’re going to talk about five different horses from a couple of rescues to a very extreme that had all the odds against this horse. And the pictures are quite shocking which I will have posted in the transcription of the podcast on our website at teamequinety.com. And the neat thing with this product is and again in this case we’re talking about five horses and as you give each horse one scoop a day or possibly two depending and I can get into the reasons one versus two scoops but if you’re just giving one scoop a day because we’re giving the horse’s body what it needs to release its own hormones then it’s that horses hormones that are going to the problem areas.

John Dowdy:

So in essence, it’s customizing to each horse and that’s important as we go through each one of these different examples in these five horses and how it’s affected them each a little bit differently while at the same time there’s commonalities with all of them softer, shinier coat, filling out more muscle, they’re happier, stronger and faster, healthier hooves, just to name a few things. But so, let’s get right into this first horse which is Dee I believe. Now Dee and Piper these were rescue horses so let’s talk about Dee first and this was just within 30 day timeframes on these two particular ones. So let’s talk about Dee first what was going on with Dee how’d you acquire Dee and what was going on?

Rachel Cleary:

Dee was a horse that our family used to train and we found her in Ohio in terrible condition. They basically gave her away for what she is. So and they had said, “She’s a little thin and we think her hocks need injected.” So my mother in law drives over there to get her and she sends me these pictures and she is not thin this horse is emaciated. I’m talking like four or five inches in between her back legs gaping open, spine’s sticking out and she’s wobbling around like she’s got APN. I mean so weak in the backend. It was a long shot to get her to where we thought she’d be in [inaudible 00:07:54] So there again threw everything at her yes food and good hay but we added Equinety.

Rachel Cleary:

And the 30 day picture on her it’s unbelievable how much she picked up and not just fat, not just weight in her belly. I mean her muscles started to come back and this horse started to move around a little bit better here and there. We didn’t put her out with other horses because of how weak she was in behind end we were really afraid they would run her and hurt her or she’d fall down. And I also sent you in a 90 day picture in there. Her 90 day picture she is ready to go in a halter she looks beautiful. [crosstalk 00:08:39] Super happy, got her awful attitude back thank you. She is now able to go out with other horses. She actually we’ve seen her run in the pasture where I’m telling you this horses was, I really thought I’d put money on it that she had EPM and she’s becoming more sound and we’re going to be able to breed her this spring.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, it’s amazing looking at the pictures and as you said it doesn’t really do it justice but in the before picture just bones I mean really.

Rachel Cleary:

Nothing there.

John Dowdy:

Yeah and then 90 days later well even in the 30 day pic is pretty darn good, it’s a little bit overcast and not a sunny but in the 90 day man put your sunglasses on.

Rachel Cleary:

Look at her hair coat.

John Dowdy:

Yeah that’s great.

Rachel Cleary:

And she came with that awful reign rot, just typical starving horse and she does now get brushed regular.

John Dowdy:

Yeah now let me ask you this question because anybody that knows anything about horse is you take a horse that has been neglected and hasn’t had any nutrition and looks like this horse does and then you give them nutrition of course they’re going to blossom and do things. So, how do you feel that Equinety added to the benefits of where this horse is today?

Rachel Cleary:

Yeah, like I said we’ve been doing this for a long time and yes when you feed them they do, they gain weight but it’s a much slower process. And one thing that we’re not having to do near as much when we add the is Equinety is we’re not having to treat all these other issues that we normally have to treat. Usually you get them in, it’s like okay we get them balanced out. Then we have to treat the ulcers because they’ve been starving. We have to give them extra [inaudible 00:10:34] We need to give them something to manage their pain issues that we’re dealing with and we’re not having to do near as much of that.

Rachel Cleary:

These horses are coming back really fast, really help in their attitudes as well. A lot of horses are very depressed. And a lot of times you’ll get a lot of weight on them and they’ll plateau off for a little bit and then you get them back up there. Since we’ve been using the Equinety it’s just like we’re just going up hill real fast. I haven’t had them plateau off near as bad.

John Dowdy:

That’s great. Okay, let’s go into Piper and how’d you acquire Piper and what was going on there?

Rachel Cleary:

Piper, let’s see she was a horse we once had and had sold and somehow she wound up in the sale barn and sold to a person who dumped her off at a boarding facility and so she was abandoned there for about three years. The lady that owned the facility had passed away and her family got the place and they didn’t want the horses. So they found out that she was once mine through some people and I went there and I got her. When I went there, well mind you before the horse this was a pretty hot headed big mare, very, very big, very pretty horse and full of attitude.

Rachel Cleary:

And I pull up there and I get there and she’s got her head hanging down on the ground. Her feet are all messed up, she’s laying on the front, she’s laying on the back, her spine’s sticking out, you can see all of her ribs. I mean she’s defeated. Her hair is pale, her tail was at her hawk. I mean this horse was beautiful the last I had seen her. Brought her home, started feeding her and gave her Equinety and I gave you a 30 day picture on that one. And along with Dan jumping in there and bouncing out her feet and we worked on her body a couple of times she’s already found her new home and back conditioning for barrel racing so that was in 30 days.

John Dowdy:

That’s crazy.

Rachel Cleary:

And the top line on her man it’s unbelievable and her tails grown quite a bit too and her mane and she’s got her fire back in her. That is one thing I’ll say about the Equinety, if you have a horse that’s gotten a lot of pain and are unhealthy for some reason and they’ve lost their fire Equinety will give it back to them, they feel much better.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. Yeah. And I think it would be important to point out too because every now and then we’re asked, “Is this product going to make my horse hot?”

Rachel Cleary:

No.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. And typically what we found it’s not like giving Jack and them up on a caffeine or it doesn’t make them lazy like a sedative. I think the best description it balances the horse and it brings out the personality of the horse because they’re not in pain or we’ll say whatever pain it would be significantly less. But a lot of times it’s just they’re a healthy, happier horse and they’re more comfortable in their skin

Rachel Cleary:

It is a clean, healthy. I mean, they feel good, they feel genuinely good. That’s the one thing I’ve noticed that even on our horses we give it to that don’t have these big major issues I don’t want to have any of them without it because I know they feel better.

John Dowdy:

Right. Yep. Awesome. Okay. Let’s go into Bristol which I think we have someone here also on the call that can talk about this particular horse. All right Sam.

Samantha Anthrope:

I have had Bristol. She was at Rachel’s barn. I was boarding her there and barrel racing and she started getting lame, swelling and when we took her to the vet and did a lameness exam it was three out of five on pick whichever leg you wanted to pick at the moment.

John Dowdy:

So she’s a high maintenance, needs attention horse.

Samantha Anthrope:

Yes very much so.

John Dowdy:

Now was she also, she was a 1D horse, right or is a 1D horse?

Rachel Cleary:

It’s all there, she is a fast cat I’m telling you and a turning machine. So to see her go from that to not usable is pretty hard.

Samantha Anthrope:

And I felt like I wasn’t, I had tried so much taking her to the vet we had done corrective shoeing, we had done injections about every, I’ve tried about everything except for the Osphos injections that I was recommended because there was a bunch of mixed opinions on that. One vet would say it was good, one would have an opposite opinion. And then Rachel turned me on to the Equinety with Bristol. And she was always one of those that would lay down in the stall at night, she always gets put up at night and when I would get there in the morning she’d have to stand up and she’d just walk so stiff and sore and lame. And if you worked her the next day I’d have to be you name it, giving her whatever to be able to see her walk and not just want to cry looking at her.

John Dowdy:

Now when you first opened the tub of Equinety what were your thoughts on the dose size?

Samantha Anthrope:

I had to do a double take and ask Rachel if it really was only one scoop of the tiny little scoop that’s in there. I’m like, “Are you sure only one of these?” But so then she was only on it. I started giving it to her December 3rd and it was about four or five days later after that I noticed a difference. I went out to the barn and when I walked out there Bristol popped up out of her stall and walked off like nothing was wrong, not stiff, not lame, absolutely nothing. And I have not seen that in at least three years in that horse.

Rachel Cleary:

Yeah. I got a message that morning, “How fast does this stuff actually work? Am I just seeing this?” And I’m like, “Well no, you’re not just seeing this.”

Samantha Anthrope:

Yeah, it was crazy. So then and now I mean I ride her and the old Bristol is back. The Bristol I used to have her personality is there. When I ride her out and I bring her back in she’s not lame the next day. The very first time I was like, “Well I’ll give this a test.” Because we went trail riding and we looked a little bit and I thought, “Well she’ll be sore, really sore tomorrow. She’ll probably be lame.” Nothing, nothing was wrong with that horse. I actually turned her out in the pasture and she took off running and bucking and for a good couple minutes straight and that horse has not done that in years. She has play time out in the pasture which I mean.

John Dowdy:

Now what you had emailed over to me earlier just giving me a little background on this horse. So she was diagnosed with mild navicular and then you were having to do some creative shoeing and three degrees wedge and that’s when you were doing the injections and rehab and all of this stuff would kind of work but it was nothing longterm.

Samantha Anthrope:

Correct. Yeah. The last time she had went there she got diagnosed and then we adjusted her shoeing and put three degree wedge Morrisons on her and trailers in the back. And it still, I mean it helped but it was not, she’s had hock injections, ankle injections and coffin joint injections.

Rachel Cleary:

Yup.

John Dowdy:

Wow. And so …

Samantha Anthrope:

And when I started this Equinety she has not had injections since then. The only difference is adding the to Equinety to her diet. We have not even taken her back for injections yet. It’s been a two year process from the start of, well about two and a half year process of when we had trouble with her to where she’s not able to do her job. And so she just started Equinety less than 60 days ago and looking like we might be able to start our job.

John Dowdy:

Wow not taking a lame step since?

Rachel Cleary:

Nope.

John Dowdy:

Wow well I tell people all the time and I will reiterate this is not a miracle product, it is not a miracle supplement but I’ll let you make up your mind hearing these stories so.

Samantha Anthrope:

Yeah, I’m a firm believer that horse will never ever again go without Equinety in her life.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, that’s incredible. Wow. Well keep us posted on that because that would be really neat to see how she does as you get her back and in racing again see where she’s at.

Samantha Anthrope:

Yeah, I plan to start legging her up and racing again here in the upcoming months.

John Dowdy:

Great. Wow. Okay. Let’s see. We’ve got two left, I believe we’re going to talk about Chance next. So tell us what was going on with Chance.

Rachel Cleary:

Chance, he came to us, he had torn his peroneus tertius and his deep extensor tendons. So, basically his left leg was just hanging on by a few threads. So the front of his left hind leg those muscles and tendons there had been near ruptured I mean torn. So he had swelling from his stifle all the way down. His whole leg was about as big as his stifle all the way down when I first saw the pictures. I mean not good so he was taken to his first vet appointment to get an ultrasound to figure out what the heck was going on. They said, “He’s torn his peroneus tertius, he’s going to have lots of rehab. At that point that vet gave him a 12 month prognosis as far as healing time to be able to start going back and getting conditioned and lunged and things like that and turnout.

Rachel Cleary:

So his owner, Becky, brought him to me from that vet appointment and started him right away on Equinety and in our physical rehab program. I had made an appointment with Dr. Davern for three weeks from the day they dropped him off to me. So we had taken him in, at this point all the swelling was gone and we were able to get an ultrasound and what they had found at that point was that he was torn in more than one spot. The original vet appointment he was so swelled up they couldn’t even see the extent of the injury. They were worse than we had thought when he had had just a 12 month prognosis. So, at that point he had shown so much healing within those three weeks that he got, his prognosis cut in half it was down five months. So we took him back home and he’s been on Equinety and our feed program and our rehabilitation program. He went home December seventh, five months on the dot and he’s back in condition and entered in the AQHA world show.

John Dowdy:

Oh my. So from 12 months down to five months and now entered into competition?

Rachel Cleary:

In five months on the dot he’s being rode. Yeah he was rode five months and one day. He was released to start, at four weeks I was able to walk him, I had gotten him up to 800 feet. So mind you that’s where this horse was at. He was on stall rest and he could start out on 200 feet a day. And then every few days I just started doubling it and he just kept accelerating and accelerating. So then we started lunging him lightly. And this horse is hard to contain, he’s full of it which is probably why he got his injury in the first place and we started lunging and then we started lunging for 20 minutes at a time. And then the day before he got home I snuck a ride on him and he hasn’t taken one step backwards.

John Dowdy:

That’s incredible. And again, hearing these stories and if you’re tuning in listening this far and we’ve got another pretty dramatic one coming up but keep in mind it’s not a miracle supplement, you’ve got a great team of people around you and this is wow I mean.

Rachel Cleary:

Absolutely there’s a lot of hard work that goes in to your entire team when you’re dealing with any kind of rehab horse but I will tell you that this product speeds it up, it accelerates it.

John Dowdy:

Yep. Yep. Well and one of the examples I tell people because we’re running a lot of things around hoof growth and sole depth and all of the problems that come around with the hooves and things. And I tell people all the time you could have the world’s best farrier standing in front of your horse but if there’s nothing to work with the farrier is not much good because they can’t do anything. And so, one of the great things with this product it helps with growing a faster, healthier, stronger hoof and so it gives a farrier more to work with in a shorter amount of time. And I think that example extends right over to everything that you’re doing from a rehab standpoint. And we’ve touched on this but it gives you more to work with in a shorter amount of time so it makes your job a lot easier and the horse isn’t in as much distress for well we’ll say shorter times versus before it would be a lot longer rehab time now it’s just a shorter rehab time.

Rachel Cleary:

Yes. And our clients are liking that.

John Dowdy:

Yes. Well it makes …

Rachel Cleary:

Much less time and money.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, that’s right so it’s less on the pocket book and everybody’s happier, horses are happier so yeah.

Rachel Cleary:

We’ll have to have our farrier on here to tell you because he knows that, he has asked me on a couple of horses without knowing, “What have you done? This horse has [inaudible 00:24:38] that she’s never had before.” So, it’s pretty crazy.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. That’s awesome. So okay, let’s get into the last one that we’re going to talk about here on this Equinety podcast. This one’s brutal and we’re going to be posting the pictures on our website, pretty intense but tell us what happened with Six?

Rachel Cleary:

Six [inaudible 00:25:04] He was a 1D barrel horse. He’d been a really great race horse before, we raised, my family raised him. We were actually at our place at a horse show. We were running barrels, we were on our way home coming down from the third barrel to make our stop and he stumbled, he stumbled out with his front left and his back right foot kicked out, out of balance and it hung him in a fence, it hung him in the bottom of a cattle panel in mid stride. And what stopped him was his foot hooked up in that cattle panel and about pulled me off the top of him.

Rachel Cleary:

I jumped off and blood was squirting higher than his hawk. It had severed his artery and compromised his coffin joint. So at that point everybody from the horse show, Samantha Anthrop and Lauren Davidson and Anita Wise jumped in and without them getting him wrapped up and getting a truck hooked up to the trailer this horse probably wouldn’t have made it. We made it to Perdue University within 30 minutes and my lucky star was met. I met Dr. Alice Davern who is a surgeon. He had Six within an hour of the injury into surgery to repair the coffin joint. His prognosis at that point was fair at best.

Rachel Cleary:

So we went ahead with it and he came out with a hard cast. Also, what they had said too was that his dispensary had been slightly compromised as well which was the least of our worries which is the biggest thing that puts barrel horses down the drain. So on top of the coffin joint injury we had a little bit of suspensory issues. So he was in a hard cast and they said that he would be in a cast for 10 months which was his original prognosis. So he had to stay at Purdue University for a week before they released him to come home.

Rachel Cleary:

Two weeks from coming home he went back to his next vet appointment and they took the cast off and he was healed, he was healed. The wound was actually healed. And they were like, “Okay, well I guess we’ll just put a soft cast on him and send him home. That is bizarre but okay Six you’re the miracle horse.” So now we’re thinking okay we still have another year of stall and rehab and things like that at least to maybe get him to where maybe he is sound enough to stay out in the pasture. So within a month from the, so we’re not even two months into his entire the whole injury, so within two months we were hand walking outside and keeping him as best as possible at a walk that we could because at any moment that horse would be jumping up and and going crazy because he felt so good. Which this horse has experienced some pain that I think a lot of animals don’t go through. And I mean we have this documented, this would blow your mind if everybody could see these before and after pictures.

Rachel Cleary:

So in less than a complete calendar year from the injury I was back riding this horse. I was actually on him within a few months. They said, “It’s not going to hurt him if you’re going to do your walking with you on his back.” So I was actually able to get on him within a few months. This horse has only been on one scoop of Equinety a day at this point. Those first three weeks that we started him I think I probably gave him two a day but after that I mean he’s just been on one a day and he’s back in the bull pen now. I run him, my husband runs him.

Rachel Cleary:

Other than his speed and his Equinety we’re not having to do anything. I haven’t injected him. He doesn’t live on Bute, he doesn’t live on anything like that. So the last visit that I went to Davern he was like, “Get this horse doing something.” I treat them like they’re glass, I’m terrified like, “Please don’t hurt yourself.” And he’s like, “Get him out of here and go do something. Give him his job back.” So I mean, to have him alive is one thing but to have my horse back, my dream horse back is just, we can’t thank you enough.

John Dowdy:

Wow, we’re blessed. I mean this product is, it’s one of the reasons I started the podcast because typically people would call in or they would email their story and I would just be sitting here and my jaw would be on the table and I’m thinking, “I cannot believe what I’m hearing.” And this was just happening over and over and over and from one extreme to another and one day it hit me and I’m like, “You know what? It’s a real shame that I’m the only one hearing this story outside of their little circle.” And so, that’s one of the reasons I started this podcast so now people around the world can hear. And you had mentioned one scoop versus two scoops. Now, the idea behind that and I brought this up in the beginning of the call but one scoop a day stimulates the pituitary to release the hormones that help the body heal at a cellular level.

John Dowdy:

So those hormones which were after growth hormone and IGF1 they have a 23 and a half hour life cycle so that’s why you give the product every day, it’s one scoop a day. So, the idea behind giving two scoops, one in the morning and one in the evening, is it’s spiking those hormones twice a day so they always stay in an elevated state. And so, one scoop a day is perfectly fine, people see changes, and I would say the upper 90 percentile of people do see changes in 30 days or less. And then in Bristol’s case, four to five days, the magic scoop of powder.

John Dowdy:

So, but we do recommend with injured horses or even performance horses that don’t really have anything going on giving a scoop in the morning and a scoop in the evening really helps accelerate the healing process even for the performance horse with recovery stamina. So we have a lot of people that swear by that. Now, I didn’t ask you this specifically but with all of these horses were you just giving one scoop or were you doing the two scoops on a consistent basis I know?

Rachel Cleary:

Six was the only one that got a couple scoops there in the beginning. And I was just praying and throwing everything I had at him at that so I haven’t had to give any body two scoops but for my performance horses I give them an extra when I know that we’re hauling for a long time just for the stress but I don’t have any horses on two scoops all the time.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. And that’s what actually we recommend if you’re hauling you can start on two scoops while you’re hauling, showing and on the way back. And what have you found? You mentioned stress. Have you noticed they’re just more comfortable? What have you noticed on your performance horses?

Rachel Cleary:

Absolutely. I mean yes, our performance the recovery time on them you can’t, yeah you can’t believe how easy they come back and I’m getting these horses, I’m talking four, five, six, seven hours in a horse trailer and they’re coming out feeling good, their legs are cold. I know my horses so that’s what I do for a living and to not have to work on my own horses as much is much helpful when we’re doing all these stressful things and hauling these horses aren’t tired. And they’ve got all their spark in there and I appreciate that. I really like how they feel on this product, they feel good.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. Well with all these horses healing ahead of schedule you’re going to be bored.

Rachel Cleary:

I know. That’s great.

John Dowdy:

That’s awesome. Well, I tell you what I really appreciate y’all taking the time. Samantha Anthrop and Rachel Cleary out of Indiana. Thank you so much for sharing your stories here on the Equinety podcast.

Rachel Cleary:

Thank you for giving us the opportunity too.

Samantha Anthrope:

Thank you.

John Dowdy:

Oh, you bet. All right. Thanks. Bye bye.

Rachel Cleary:

Bye.

 

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Rachel Cleary & Sam Anthrope – Horse Rehab - Equinety accelerates healing process - Suspensory – flexor tendon – Navicular – Mystery Lameness and more   - John Dowdy: - Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. Rachel Cleary & Sam Anthrope – Horse Rehab - Equinety accelerates healing process - Suspensory – flexor tendon – Navicular – Mystery Lameness and more<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. This is a special one although I think every week is special but we're going to swing up into Indiana and we've got Rachel Cleary on the line now. Her background is rehabbing horses that come from well one end of the spectrum to the other and we'll get into that but what's unique about this particular podcast is she drug on one of her friends and boarders that's going to talk about her horse and how she found Equinety. So Rachel Cleary and Sam Anthrop welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Rachel Cleary:<br /> <br /> Hi, thanks for having us.<br /> <br /> Samantha Anthrope:<br /> <br /> Hi, thank you.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Oh you bet. We're excited to have you. So let's get right into this. Rachel, let's start off with just talking a little bit about the work that you do with rehabbing horses and where do they come from, what kind of stuff do you typically deal with, how long you've been doing it, that kind of stuff.<br /> <br /> Rachel Cleary:<br /> <br /> Well we have been doing rehab really my whole life that I can remember. We've always gotten horses that have been in bad conditions and rehabbed them weight ways and health ways to get them to get show homes and things like that. We started doing physical rehabilitation about eight years ago. A certified massage therapist, rehab therapist among a million other things here. But we really do a lot of sports injuries and weight issues, elderly horses, things like that. So, a lot of extreme cases come in as far as pain or just in your general killer pin type courses that have been abused so not just weight gain but physical rehabilitation.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Yeah, so we can be talking from something very I mean like a weight gain type of thing which nutrition and some exercising things to very severe like we've got to have the professional team because I mean you do work with, well tell us about the team that you work with.<br /> <br /> Rachel Cleary:<br /> <br /> Absolutely. I have an awesome team. I have a veterinarian that is one of which is our, we call her our emergency onsite farrier, Chris Chapel. She lives about 10 miles from us so she can get to the barn pronto. She is always got eyes on our horses. We have a corrective farrier, Dan Woody, who's also an RVT who does all of our balancing with the hoofs. And then we work with Dr Davern from Centaur Equine Specialty Hospital in Shelbyville, Indiana. He is a surgeon and he takes all of our extreme cases and helps us with these really tough journeys so we have a great team.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Yeah, that's incredible. Now let's talk about now you've been doing this for a long time and you've been using the Equinety product for about how long?<br /> <br /> Rachel Cleary:<br /> <br /> Since July of 2017 so this will be going on our third year so about two and a half years with the product.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> And I think it's important because the reason I asked you that question is since you've been doing rehab work that brings all kinds of challenges to the table you didn't have Equinety. You've only been using it for two and a half years. So what is the biggest thing that you've noticed since adding Equinety to your program?<br /> <br /> Rachel Cleary:<br /> <br /> How fast this product accelerates everything that we do from weight gain to muscle gain, to the healing processes of physical wounds, flesh wounds, cuts like that, and internal wounds as far as suspensory injuries and torn muscles and things like that. We've been doing it a long time and rehab's tough and every horse is different. And even with the weight gain issues you're not just targeting on... John Dowdy 32:29
058 – Mary Patterson – Trail Horse – Very reactive, anxious, couldn’t control her attention or focus, easy keeper – Now Happier, More Muscle, More Focused, More Balanced https://www.teamequinety.com/058-mary-patterson-trail-horse-very-reactive-anxious-couldnt-control-her-attention-or-focus-easy-keeper-now-happier-more-muscle-more-focused-more-balanced/ Wed, 08 Apr 2020 13:00:59 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1928   Mary Patterson – Trail Horse - Very reactive, anxious, couldn't control her attention or focus, easy keeper – Now Happier, More Muscle, More Focused, More Balanced   John Dowdy: Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Iowa. We've got Mary Patterson on this week. Mary, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Mary Patterson: Well, thank you for having me, John. I'm excited to talk about this great product. John Dowdy: Well, we're excited to have you on, as well. And, as with most of these podcast, I came across one of your comments on our Facebook advertising that we do so much of and I believe the way that it was worded that this product literally saved your horse's life and I'm like, okay, we've got to dig into this one to see what's going on. Because I tell people this is not a miracle supplement but some of these stories, it really makes you wonder sometimes. But, before we get into all of that, you have a trail horse. Tell us about this mare and what she was like prior to anything going on. What was your daily activities like and what did you guys do together? Mary Patterson: Okay, well, she is a 15-year-old quarter horse mare and have done a lot of trail riding on her. Showed her in her earlier years and then have just been riding with my friends usually three times during the week and every weekend going camping. She's been to South Dakota and just all over for me. She's my primary mare and my go-to so I put a lot of miles on her. And, because she's such a steady mare, I decided that I wanted to raise a colt out of her. So at 14 years old I got her bred and she had her first foal in May of this year at 15 years old. So, very happy that the birth and everything seemed to go well. But she did colic that night that she foaled, which is very unusual. Mary Patterson: This mare is just the image of health all of her life, very easy keeper, but she had just foaled and with her uterus contracting, she did colic and we were able to give her some Banamine and she came out of that and for the next couple of months didn't seem to really miss a beat. She was back to being fat and nursing that colt and he was growing good until July 30th and that day was very scary for me. Mary Patterson: She had been colicky the evening before and we were able to give her some Banamine and she kind of came out of it. Then that morning of the 30th she was still a little uncomfortable and not eating. So we gave her some more Banamine and then, by the time I left for work, she was [inaudible 00:03:01] a bit and had passed some piles [inaudible 00:03:04]. I was still concerned and was able to get off work a little early and come home to check on her. And when I looked in the barn about 2:00 that afternoon, it was evident that she was in distress. Mary Patterson: She had been rolling. She had some marks on the side of her head where she had obviously scuffed her face when she'd gotten down. I quickly got her to Iowa State University in Ames, which is about [inaudible 00:03:36] away from me. They have a great team there and they descended on her. And, as each test came in, it was just getting more and more grim. The tentative diagnosis they gave me was a nephrosplenic entrapment. This is where the gut is actually trapped over the ligament that supports the kidneys and the spleen. Not a good diagnosis. John Dowdy: No. Mary Patterson: That was my focus, just saving the mare. The surgery is probably, oh gosh, seemed like I was there for days, but a couple hours, three hours surgery where they have to remove the whole gut and bring it down and then go through each section of the intestine, which she did have a twist in her small intestine, as well, and put all that back in place. And she came out of that surgery. I've never been so scared in my life because she just looked horrible and they put her back to ICU and she had her colt at her side, as well,

 

Mary Patterson – Trail Horse – Very reactive, anxious, couldn’t control her attention
or focus, easy keeper – Now Happier, More Muscle, More Focused, More Balanced

 

John Dowdy:

Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We’re going to swing up into Iowa. We’ve got Mary Patterson on this week. Mary, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Mary Patterson:

Well, thank you for having me, John. I’m excited to talk about this great product.

John Dowdy:

Well, we’re excited to have you on, as well. And, as with most of these podcast, I came across one of your comments on our Facebook advertising that we do so much of and I believe the way that it was worded that this product literally saved your horse’s life and I’m like, okay, we’ve got to dig into this one to see what’s going on. Because I tell people this is not a miracle supplement but some of these stories, it really makes you wonder sometimes. But, before we get into all of that, you have a trail horse. Tell us about this mare and what she was like prior to anything going on. What was your daily activities like and what did you guys do together?

Mary Patterson:

Okay, well, she is a 15-year-old quarter horse mare and have done a lot of trail riding on her. Showed her in her earlier years and then have just been riding with my friends usually three times during the week and every weekend going camping. She’s been to South Dakota and just all over for me. She’s my primary mare and my go-to so I put a lot of miles on her. And, because she’s such a steady mare, I decided that I wanted to raise a colt out of her. So at 14 years old I got her bred and she had her first foal in May of this year at 15 years old. So, very happy that the birth and everything seemed to go well. But she did colic that night that she foaled, which is very unusual.

Mary Patterson:

This mare is just the image of health all of her life, very easy keeper, but she had just foaled and with her uterus contracting, she did colic and we were able to give her some Banamine and she came out of that and for the next couple of months didn’t seem to really miss a beat. She was back to being fat and nursing that colt and he was growing good until July 30th and that day was very scary for me.

Mary Patterson:

She had been colicky the evening before and we were able to give her some Banamine and she kind of came out of it. Then that morning of the 30th she was still a little uncomfortable and not eating. So we gave her some more Banamine and then, by the time I left for work, she was [inaudible 00:03:01] a bit and had passed some piles [inaudible 00:03:04]. I was still concerned and was able to get off work a little early and come home to check on her. And when I looked in the barn about 2:00 that afternoon, it was evident that she was in distress.

Mary Patterson:

She had been rolling. She had some marks on the side of her head where she had obviously scuffed her face when she’d gotten down. I quickly got her to Iowa State University in Ames, which is about [inaudible 00:03:36] away from me. They have a great team there and they descended on her. And, as each test came in, it was just getting more and more grim. The tentative diagnosis they gave me was a nephrosplenic entrapment. This is where the gut is actually trapped over the ligament that supports the kidneys and the spleen. Not a good diagnosis.

John Dowdy:

No.

Mary Patterson:

That was my focus, just saving the mare. The surgery is probably, oh gosh, seemed like I was there for days, but a couple hours, three hours surgery where they have to remove the whole gut and bring it down and then go through each section of the intestine, which she did have a twist in her small intestine, as well, and put all that back in place. And she came out of that surgery. I’ve never been so scared in my life because she just looked horrible and they put her back to ICU and she had her colt at her side, as well, and they had to separate them so he could nibble on some hay, but she couldn’t have any feed. And the whole time the vets were like, “She’s not out of the woods. She’s not out of the woods.”

Mary Patterson:

She was there at the clinic for a week and every day the vet would call me twice a day and there were ups and downs. The blood work would come back and the numbers were too high or the numbers were too low. So it was kind of a roller coaster ride. But, after a week, everything started leveling out and she was able to come home. She’d have to be on stall rest for four weeks. And then after that she could be moved into a little bit larger pen and then, at eight weeks, a little bit larger pen. And then at 12 weeks she could start returning back to work at a walk and a trot.

Mary Patterson:

But this whole time they kept making sure to let me know that she wasn’t out of the woods and to watch her closely. I had taken off work so I could watch her closely and through this time she just started losing weight, a pretty demanding foal. Granted, I could have weaned him, but I didn’t want to do that just yet. I actually didn’t want to cause the mare more distress by doing that. So she was on good hay, good pelleted feed. I was getting her out to grass for an hour or two a day and she just was not thriving. This mare, like I said, was an easy keeper, but I’m seeing her withers pretty well defined. I’m seeing her hip bones start to jut out. I’m seeing her rib cage.

Mary Patterson:

Even the pictures that I took when she was in that condition, someone who doesn’t know the mare would probably say, “Well, she’s feeding a colt, she’s going to lose some weight.” But I knew that wasn’t this mare’s normal state. I knew that what I was doing was not working and that I needed some type of supplement and that’s when I found Equinety on Facebook.

John Dowdy:

All right. And I think that’s important. We talk a lot about how much the Equinety product really helps horses. That’s our tagline, “Helping horses worldwide.” But, in this case, up until this point, you didn’t even know about Equinety. You weren’t on the search for anything. So this horse was under a great team of vets under their care and you’re doing everything that you knew to do and you had the good nutrition and all of those components, which, I want to stress is, again, vitally important obviously to be under the vet care and everything else.

John Dowdy:

But as you got up to this point and on the road to recovery there was still just something missing. Even with the nutrition and all the recommendations from the vets and you were doing everything that you need to do, but being an easy keeper and you’re seeing ribs and withers so, okay, something is not going right or you’re missing something.

Mary Patterson:

Yes.

John Dowdy:

So what did you start searching for online?

Mary Patterson:

Well, I didn’t even know. I just needed something. I was looking for maybe like a weight builder. I had had other products throughout my horse career that had helped with that. So I was just looking for something to give that little extra that would help her overcome this major event in her life. I knew if I didn’t do something that she was just going to keep going downhill. I was very concerned for her. Like I said, I had the option of weaning the colt but I really didn’t think that was even going to do what I needed it to do. I really don’t think she would’ve recovered back to full health without something extra.

Mary Patterson:

And when I come across the Equinety, I went in and started reading about it and the thing that caught my attention was that it helped heal the body at the cellular level. And because I myself am on a product that does that and I know what it has done for my wellbeing, I thought if this product can do for my horse what the product I’m on is doing for me, then I’m going to try it. So I ordered the trial size and I was really interested in the fact that there wasn’t a loading dose because almost every supplement I’ve ever given a horse, there was a two, three-week period of loading dose.

Mary Patterson:

So that caught my attention. That was interesting to me, and that the dose was so small. It was about the size of the end of my thumb. So I gave her the first dose that evening with her feed and she didn’t even bat an eye, didn’t even notice it was in her feed. About the second week, I’m watching for these changes and about the second week I had her out on grass and she’s a very rule-following mare. She stays where I put her and I don’t have to worry about it too much. Well, I put her out on this grass. I was’t very far away from her and her head came up and she jumped up in the air and she took a kick out, just like a colt again, and I thought, oh, I’m not sure you’re supposed to be doing that. You’re still kind of on bed rest.

Mary Patterson:

But that’s the first thing I noticed. The light came back into her eyes and she acted like she felt good. So I actually had to start watching her a little closer when I her out so she wouldn’t start bucking and playing. But the first thing I noticed, and then her weight came back on. Just amazing. And the muscles started showing. This is a mare that has a lot of muscle definition. The muscles showing back. And about four weeks into that of course I ordered the large container [inaudible 00:12:24] because I said this [inaudible 00:12:25] and I weaned the colt and they didn’t miss a beat. He looked good because obviously she was getting that [inaudible 00:12:36]. He looked good and he weaned without incident. It was just kind of amazing to me.

John Dowdy:

Wow. Well, I’ll take a minute here because if there’s somebody tuning in for the first time and maybe you’re in a situation where you’re kind of at your wit’s end or you’re just at a sticking point and wondering, there’s got to be something missing. So the Equinety Horse Excel product, it’s 100% pure amino acids, but they’re specifically formulated and combined to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body. That’s what releases the necessary hormones, which help heal at a cellular level. So, so many times, just like in this scenario, this horse in particular was on the road to recovery, but there was just something lacking.

John Dowdy:

We have plenty of stories going into high performance barns where these horses get the creme de la creme and you wouldn’t think that they’re missing anything. But when they add the Equinety product to their program, they see these horses continue to blossom, soft tissue repair, recovery, stamina, focus. It is just an amazing product. We’re blessed because we had no idea it was going to take off like it has in the horse industry. Now, what’s interesting, as you and I were speaking prior to recording the podcast here, what was the horse’s demeanor and attitude and everything prior to all of this? I mean prior to the injury and the surgery and everything, what was she typically like out on the trail?

Mary Patterson:

Well, you had mentioned focus. This mare’s broke and I can ride her through a fire, but if there is ever a trigger, say, a turkey flies through the timber or a deer jumps up, she would be very reactive to that and it would then be very hard for me to get her focus back. It was like from that point on she was very looky and just anxious and jig-joggy, just very hard to get that focus back. I’ve been riding her this winter. Luckily the weather here in Iowa hasn’t been too bad and I have been able to ride her out in the fields. I rode her past the terraced area and had two pheasant jump up out of the terraced area and she just pointed her ears at them and went on. And then another one flew out.

Mary Patterson:

Now, in the past, after those first two flew out, I would be on a different horse. Because [crosstalk 00:15:26] the fire-breathing dragon just jumped up in front of her and it would be so hard to get her back. I was just so, I don’t know, amazed that she pretty much just pointed her ears towards them. We walked on, she didn’t even halt in her step. And then that next one flew up and it was just like an everyday occurrence and we continued to walk.

Mary Patterson:

There was just no anxiety in her, I guess is the word I was looking for. And we just continued on with our ride and that, after being off two seasons of riding, and now I think this is probably the fourth time I’ve ridden her since she was okayed and cleared to go. I’ve got the mare back that I would start a trail ride with and not necessarily end the trail ride with. It was amazing to me. She just has that focus. She’s clear eyed. She has the energy, but it’s not that nervous energy.

John Dowdy:

Yes. And I would say, too, so many times we hear horses that had a lot of stress, nervousness, they’re anxious, we’ve had reports of complete demeanor changes in as little as three days. But what I find amazing with this story is, prior to all of this happening, this is a horse that you ride and ride a lot so you know her little quirks, she’s kind of, as you say, very reactive to things, anxious and, if something happens, forget about getting her attention and focus back. So you take a horse like that and then all of the trauma and almost very day-to-day prognosis here of possibly losing her. Then you don’t get to ride her for two seasons and she’s got a foal on the ground and then you started giving her the Equinety and it like she’s not stressed, she’s very focused. It’s like, “Okay, this is weird.”

Mary Patterson:

Yeah. And she’s out with three other younger horses and I rode out into pasture and they came running. If you’ve ever been on a horse when a few other horses go running past you, even that didn’t faze her. I turned her around and I followed them up to the buildings and she was just all business.

John Dowdy:

That’s something.

Mary Patterson:

Yes. That’s something to say for her, at least.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, for sure. Well, I tell you, if you’re tuning in listening to this and you’ve got a horse that’s a little hard to stay focused, this is one of the most common things that we hear over and over and over. I would say probably the best way I can describe it is, because we’re helping the body heal at a cellular level, then the horses seem to be more balanced from the inside out and they’re more comfortable in their skin.

Mary Patterson:

I agree, yeah.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. So things just don’t bother them as much. Now, one of the things, and you don’t have updated x-rays or anything like that, but what have you noticed? And you had mentioned this during the podcast, but prior to when we were chatting about her hooves.

Mary Patterson:

Yes. My husband’s a farrier and he’s always talked to me about my horses’ crap feet. His term. So there is only one supplement that he would recommend to his clients and I got her on that and she’s been on it for, oh my gosh, probably six, seven years. When I got my Equinety, I was running out of that product, so I did not reorder it because I had seen different testimonies on Facebook of how this is helping their horses’ feet. So I thought, well, this will be great if this one product can do not only what I need it to do right now, but help those feet.

Mary Patterson:

And her feet look great. The new growth looks really good. She had always had a crack in her foot and that is growing out with no crack in it. The feet just look good. They’re not that dry look to them. They look healthy. And in Iowa in mid-winter, that’s, that’s kind of saying something, too. They look like they have moisture to them, if that’s even possible.

John Dowdy:

Yes, yes. So, you had been using this other hoof supplement product for six, seven years?

Mary Patterson:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

John Dowdy:

And then how long have you been using the Equinety now?

Mary Patterson:

Since, let’s see, the end of August.

John Dowdy:

So the end of August. And at the time of this recording will be published… Well, we’re recording this in January so, what, five months? Four months?

Mary Patterson:

Yes. Yep. Yep. And I’m already seeing that.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. So four months in seeing massive changes versus the other product, which we don’t name names. I’m sure there’s some great products out there, but six, seven years and you haven’t seen this kind of improvement like you’ve seen in the last four months?

Mary Patterson:

That’s correct. Yes.

John Dowdy:

Wow. Well, maybe we can sweet talk your husband into referring the Equinety product now.

Mary Patterson:

I’m working on that, believe me.

John Dowdy:

Awesome. Yeah. Well, I tell you what-

Mary Patterson:

It’s just a great product that kind of does everything. When you’re on a budget you can go out and use them by several different products to target maybe the things that you’re needing to tweak a little bit, but when you can find one product at a reasonable price that you’re getting amazing results with, it’s pretty easy to tell your friends more about it.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, it really is, at a dollar a day. And I tell people this all the time. We have a lot of phone calls that come in and people asking, because it’s like they see all the different stories and like, “Okay, wait a minute, you’re telling me that one product, how can it do all this stuff? Because now this is just sounding like a snake oil tincture.” Which, it’s a powder, so technically it would be a snake powder. “It sounds too good to be true,” all these types of things.

John Dowdy:

But when you really understand what’s going on in the body, we’re giving the body what it needs to release its own hormones, therefore the body is helping to repair itself. So, the example I give, you could have 12 horses with 12 different things going on and throw in a high performance horse that really doesn’t have any issues. But because we’re giving the body what it needs to heal itself, in this case, you first started off looking for a weight gainer-type product and this product is not a weight gain product.

John Dowdy:

It is a product that’s giving the body what it needs to release its own hormones and then therefore the body is determining what needs to happen. In your case, you were needing weight gain, but not only did you get the weight gain, but you’re having great hoof growth, stronger, plus not to mention the better focus and non-nervousness and all these types of things. So that’s pretty phenomenal and very, very common with this.

Mary Patterson:

When you consider horses are very amazing creatures and, if they are given the tools that they need, can heal wonderfully. So that’s what I consider this as is just a tool that she needed and I’m not feeding her very much. She’s out in the pasture now and she is only getting two pounds of grain in the evening with this supplement and she looks great. It’s amazing.

John Dowdy:

And back to riding and doing… Well, you said four times. You’ve been on her four times now since this?

Mary Patterson:

Right. Four or five times, but yeah. And hopping on her bareback and just with a loping martingale on and going.

John Dowdy:

Wow, that’s great.

Mary Patterson:

It’s been great, yes.

John Dowdy:

Well, Mary, I really appreciate you taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast and, for anybody tuning in, maybe they’re on the fence a little bit, maybe they’re a little bit skeptical, even though they’ve listened now to another great success story, is there anything that you might want to tell them to say, “Hey, come on over. The water’s warm”?

Mary Patterson:

Well, yes. I would encourage them to find you on Facebook because the stories there are from real people. I just thank Equinety for bringing my mare back to good health and I am definitely going to get it on auto ship so I don’t have to worry about running out and she’ll be on it for life, as well as the colt.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. Which, by the way, I didn’t mention this before, but we have a lot of people, “Is it safe for pregnant mares or for foals?” Yes, it is. It’s 100% pure amino acids and it actually helps with the development of those young ones. But 100% safe and awesome. Well, Mary Patterson out of Iowa, thank you so much for taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast.

Mary Patterson:

Yes, thank you for talking with me.

John Dowdy:

Oh, you bet. Thank you. Bye-bye.

Mary Patterson:

Bye-bye.

 


 

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  Mary Patterson – Trail Horse - Very reactive, anxious, couldn't control her attention or focus, easy keeper – Now Happier, More Muscle, More Focused, More Balanced   - John Dowdy: - Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast.  <br /> Mary Patterson – Trail Horse - Very reactive, anxious, couldn't control her attention<br /> or focus, easy keeper – Now Happier, More Muscle, More Focused, More Balanced<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Iowa. We've got Mary Patterson on this week. Mary, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Mary Patterson:<br /> <br /> Well, thank you for having me, John. I'm excited to talk about this great product.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Well, we're excited to have you on, as well. And, as with most of these podcast, I came across one of your comments on our Facebook advertising that we do so much of and I believe the way that it was worded that this product literally saved your horse's life and I'm like, okay, we've got to dig into this one to see what's going on. Because I tell people this is not a miracle supplement but some of these stories, it really makes you wonder sometimes. But, before we get into all of that, you have a trail horse. Tell us about this mare and what she was like prior to anything going on. What was your daily activities like and what did you guys do together?<br /> <br /> Mary Patterson:<br /> <br /> Okay, well, she is a 15-year-old quarter horse mare and have done a lot of trail riding on her. Showed her in her earlier years and then have just been riding with my friends usually three times during the week and every weekend going camping. She's been to South Dakota and just all over for me. She's my primary mare and my go-to so I put a lot of miles on her. And, because she's such a steady mare, I decided that I wanted to raise a colt out of her. So at 14 years old I got her bred and she had her first foal in May of this year at 15 years old. So, very happy that the birth and everything seemed to go well. But she did colic that night that she foaled, which is very unusual.<br /> <br /> Mary Patterson:<br /> <br /> This mare is just the image of health all of her life, very easy keeper, but she had just foaled and with her uterus contracting, she did colic and we were able to give her some Banamine and she came out of that and for the next couple of months didn't seem to really miss a beat. She was back to being fat and nursing that colt and he was growing good until July 30th and that day was very scary for me.<br /> <br /> Mary Patterson:<br /> <br /> She had been colicky the evening before and we were able to give her some Banamine and she kind of came out of it. Then that morning of the 30th she was still a little uncomfortable and not eating. So we gave her some more Banamine and then, by the time I left for work, she was [inaudible 00:03:01] a bit and had passed some piles [inaudible 00:03:04]. I was still concerned and was able to get off work a little early and come home to check on her. And when I looked in the barn about 2:00 that afternoon, it was evident that she was in distress.<br /> <br /> Mary Patterson:<br /> <br /> She had been rolling. She had some marks on the side of her head where she had obviously scuffed her face when she'd gotten down. I quickly got her to Iowa State University in Ames, which is about [inaudible 00:03:36] away from me. They have a great team there and they descended on her. And, as each test came in, it was just getting more and more grim. The tentative diagnosis they gave me was a nephrosplenic entrapment. This is where the gut is actually trapped over the ligament that supports the kidneys and the spleen. Not a good diagnosis.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> No.<br /> <br /> Mary Patterson:<br /> <br /> That was my focus, just saving the mare. The surgery is probably, oh gosh, seemed like I was there for days, but a couple hours, three hours surgery where they have to remove the whole gut and bring it down and then go through each section of the intestine, which she did have a twist in her small intestine... John Dowdy 26:28
057 – Janet Culley – My Horse was Depressed – Abused – Life is Back After 9 years – Happy – Majestic – Running and Playing https://www.teamequinety.com/057-janet-culley-my-horse-was-depressed-abused-life-is-back-after-9-years-happy-majestic-running-and-playing/ Wed, 01 Apr 2020 13:00:57 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1925 Janet Culley – My Horse was Depressed – Abused – Life is Back After 9 years – Happy – Majestic – Running and Playing   John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're going to swing up into Alabama. We've got Jan Coley on the podcast this week, and I'm going to tell you this story is... I'm just going to say it's unbelievable. If you're dealing with this scenario, a situation with your horse that you believe you're boxed in a corner and you don't have anywhere to go, you got to listen to this story. It's absolutely amazing and might even bring a tear or two, because this is the ultimate comeback story, I would say. So without further ado, Jan Coley, welcome to the Equinety Podcast. Jan Culley:        Well thank you, and thank you for allowing me to tell my story. John Dowdy:     Well, we're excited. As every week, I'm excited to have guests on and to share these stories, and I think this one is probably one of the most intense ones that we've had on. So let's just start from the beginning. Tell us about this horse. Well, let's just start from the beginning. Jan Culley:        Okay. I bought Chino in 2006 I believe it was, beautiful horse. And I worked with him every day basically. Then I had someone come up and say, "Well, I know a good person who can train him." He was still a stallion. He was two years old, two and a half years old. I should have queried it more, but he was a farrier. The farrier was a farrier of mine who was very good, and it was his brother that supposedly trained horses. I just took it as it was a good thing. John Dowdy:     Sure. Jan Culley:        Of course we asked where do we take him, and everything, and made the arrangements and he loaded on the trailer without a problem. He was good as gold and went to this place where there was other horses but nobody around. And I thought, well, this is really strange. I hated to leave him, but they told me to put him in a stall and that they'd be there to work with him. Well, as far as I knew, that's where he was. Of course we took with us two big tubs, the huge tubs of grain for him, what he was having, plus bales of [inaudible 00:02:48]. So he had plenty of food and everything, and I never heard anything. So I called the farrier and I said, "Hey, your brother, is your brother working with Chino? What's going on?" And he says, "well, yeah, I said he had to move him." And I said, "really? Now where to?" And he said, "well to where he lived which was even... which was quite a ways away. Jan Culley:        So I said, "well, I'd like to come and see him." Well he said, "well, he needs to just have at least a week to work with them, et cetera and so on." And he said, "and then after that it you are more than welcome to go and see him." So I guess some people they don't like anybody to be there that first week. So I said, "well okay, would you ask him to call me please?" And anyway, never got a call. And then I called the guy again and I said, "look, I need to go and see the horse. And he said, "well, here's my dad's number if you call him first and then he can give you directions." Well, I called the father and he said, "well, can you leave it another week?" He said, "we're really working with him right now." And I said, "no." I said, "I need to come and see him right now." This was like three weeks after. John Dowdy:     Wow. Jan Culley:        Must have been going on the fourth week. And so I got the address and everything and he says, "why don't you just leave it a few more days?" I said, "no, I'm coming right now." And we left and got there and I was almost sick. He was skin and bone. He was stood this cage like thing. I don't know what they used it for. It's still a lot. And he had a saddle on and that saddle had apparently been on him for days. John Dowdy:     Holy cow. Jan Culley:        And he was stood there and just awful. And I went into him and he just his eyes were vacant basically.

Janet Culley – My Horse was Depressed – Abused –
Life is Back After 9 years – Happy – Majestic – Running and Playing

 

John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety Podcast. We’re going to swing up into Alabama. We’ve got Jan Coley on the podcast this week, and I’m going to tell you this story is… I’m just going to say it’s unbelievable. If you’re dealing with this scenario, a situation with your horse that you believe you’re boxed in a corner and you don’t have anywhere to go, you got to listen to this story. It’s absolutely amazing and might even bring a tear or two, because this is the ultimate comeback story, I would say. So without further ado, Jan Coley, welcome to the Equinety Podcast.

Jan Culley:        Well thank you, and thank you for allowing me to tell my story.

John Dowdy:     Well, we’re excited. As every week, I’m excited to have guests on and to share these stories, and I think this one is probably one of the most intense ones that we’ve had on. So let’s just start from the beginning. Tell us about this horse. Well, let’s just start from the beginning.

Jan Culley:        Okay. I bought Chino in 2006 I believe it was, beautiful horse. And I worked with him every day basically. Then I had someone come up and say, “Well, I know a good person who can train him.” He was still a stallion. He was two years old, two and a half years old. I should have queried it more, but he was a farrier. The farrier was a farrier of mine who was very good, and it was his brother that supposedly trained horses. I just took it as it was a good thing.

John Dowdy:     Sure.

Jan Culley:        Of course we asked where do we take him, and everything, and made the arrangements and he loaded on the trailer without a problem. He was good as gold and went to this place where there was other horses but nobody around. And I thought, well, this is really strange. I hated to leave him, but they told me to put him in a stall and that they’d be there to work with him. Well, as far as I knew, that’s where he was. Of course we took with us two big tubs, the huge tubs of grain for him, what he was having, plus bales of [inaudible 00:02:48]. So he had plenty of food and everything, and I never heard anything. So I called the farrier and I said, “Hey, your brother, is your brother working with Chino? What’s going on?” And he says, “well, yeah, I said he had to move him.” And I said, “really? Now where to?” And he said, “well to where he lived which was even… which was quite a ways away.

Jan Culley:        So I said, “well, I’d like to come and see him.” Well he said, “well, he needs to just have at least a week to work with them, et cetera and so on.” And he said, “and then after that it you are more than welcome to go and see him.” So I guess some people they don’t like anybody to be there that first week. So I said, “well okay, would you ask him to call me please?” And anyway, never got a call. And then I called the guy again and I said, “look, I need to go and see the horse. And he said, “well, here’s my dad’s number if you call him first and then he can give you directions.” Well, I called the father and he said, “well, can you leave it another week?” He said, “we’re really working with him right now.” And I said, “no.” I said, “I need to come and see him right now.” This was like three weeks after.

John Dowdy:     Wow.

Jan Culley:        Must have been going on the fourth week. And so I got the address and everything and he says, “why don’t you just leave it a few more days?” I said, “no, I’m coming right now.” And we left and got there and I was almost sick. He was skin and bone. He was stood this cage like thing. I don’t know what they used it for. It’s still a lot. And he had a saddle on and that saddle had apparently been on him for days.

John Dowdy:     Holy cow.

Jan Culley:        And he was stood there and just awful. And I went into him and he just his eyes were vacant basically. And the guy came around, he says, “well,” he said “he’s been sick we’ve been doctoring him, we’ve been trying to get him well. And I said, “move out of my way.” I said, “where’s his food? And hay,” “well it’s all gone.”

Jan Culley:        They’d given their horses all the food and the hay.

John Dowdy:     Oh my gosh.

Jan Culley:        And apparently they had been beating him was what I found out. They beat him on as rump with a two by four. And that saddle had been on him for days. And so I took him out of there and I loaded him up and my husband was in… He doesn’t say much. It’s out of line. I was just beside myself. I said, “you’ll be hearing from me and you’ll be hearing from my lawyer.” I said, “this is out absolutely outrageous.” “Well we, we just, we, it’s not our fault,” blah, blah, blah. So anyway, we just… I loaded him up and basically I just didn’t even know if I’d get him back in one piece.

Jan Culley:        I got him home and I immediately called my vet and he came out that same day and he said, “who is… What is this?” And I said, “this is Chino.” He said, “you’ve got to be kidding me.” I said, “no sir, I’m not.” I said, “do the guy’s brother?” And he said, “is that who’s had him?” And I said, “yeah.” He said, “well, I wish I had of known before.” He said, “it’s not the first time he’s ruined a horse.”

John Dowdy:     Oh my gosh.

Jan Culley:        And so then I started finding things out. They had almost killed him with the… I guess he got really down, got the flue or whatever had been out there in all kinds of weather and in that cage. And so, I mean, he was never the same after that. I built him back up. I mean, he was, I can send you photographs of when he was… what, before he went to be trained and he was just beautiful and then we… The vet worked with me to get him back, but he was never really the same. And I basically just worked with him being close to him and, but he wouldn’t even let me touch his rear end and the joints and stuff. Wouldn’t let me touch him at all. He just got really wild. And I started to keep him in and feed him inside and everything and he would back up away from the feed bowl and backed into a corner. And that’s probably what they did to him. They beat him. Before they’d let him have some feed.

John Dowdy:     Wow. And what’s the point of that?

Jan Culley:        Exactly, I don’t know. But the guy apparently left the area. I think they realized I was really, really mad. And so I basically let him be a pasture ornament except for me just trying to be around him and bring him to where he could trust me again, which has been, it’s been kind of difficult, but he would let me go to him and everything and my daughter came from Alaska and he just absolutely adored her and she could just barely touch him all over and she’s a therapist for the soldiers coming back from Iraq and everything. So she worked with him with Reiki and with massage therapy and everything, but he still, she couldn’t get near his back end very well. So I started to saddle him up and kind of just lean over the saddle and he let me get on him and we were in the arena and I just basically sat there and I just rubbed him. And I was sitting there and I think, but he was locked up totally. I could not make him move.

Jan Culley:        So I had my trainer came and” he said, well, let’s try and get him on the trail” after I’ve been sitting on him and stuff. And I could basically get him just to walk a little around the arena, but not much. I’d never saw him run. I never saw him like he was before he went away. And we actually took him out on the trail with a young man, 17, 18 he rode him, I rode my own horse and then the trainer rode another one of mine and I’ve got photographs of it and he was just stood with his head down and there was no life in him, but he, all he could do was walk in a straight line.

Jan Culley:        Then I basically, I had a chiropractor come in, I had a massage therapist coming and it was really scary because I wasn’t sure that they were safe enough to do what they needed to do and, but they did. And, I mean he, but he still had that vacant look that is basically, he was totally just stood, and of course he was away all the time from my other horses. He would eat away from them on his own outside when I put hay out. I just feed them grain in the evenings and he was just totally not really with it. And it was funny. I’ve been seeing the Equinity on Facebook. I use Facebook quite a bit with my horses and of course keeping in touch with my daughter in Alaska.

John Dowdy:     Sure.

Jan Culley:        It’s easier than trying to catch her when she’s doing therapy and things that. So we have this agreement if it’s something urgent, she’ll ding me and, and otherwise she’ll just contact me through text and stuff. But where was I going with that.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. You had been seeing the Equinity on Facebook,

Jan Culley:        Right? Exactly. Because of my daughter and of course I check on horse stuff all the time and I saw the Equinity and I saw that people were having good results of horses that lame and horses that are really not doing well. And I felt I’m going to try that on Chino and I’d actually started bringing him in at night instead of feeding him with my other two boys out in the small paddock that I have. I switched him out and he started coming in and eating and I got the same thing, if I went to the feed bowl, he just backed away right into the corner and flattened his ears back. As if he was going to get beaten I think

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Now how much time…. So he was at this person’s place for four weeks until you brought him home. So how much time now had he’d been back at your place up to this point?

Jan Culley:        Oh my gosh. It’s been a number of years.

John Dowdy:     Really?

Jan Culley:        Yes. I have been trying all this time to work with him and never really gotten very far except I did, like I said, we got him out on the trail one time, but he could basically only go in a straight line. And it was hard work for the young man because I told him, I said, “please do not push on him, do anything that just… gentle him through it. Use gentle horsemanship, which is what I’m a big fan of. All my horses are like babies. They do as they’re told and that’s the way it is. And I’m the alpha mare even though I’ve got one out there that takes care of them. But anyway, it’s been oh gosh, how many years? It’s got to be the least. It’s got to be at least 13 then.

John Dowdy:     13 years.

Jan Culley:        Yes. No, it’s not been 13 years. He is about 13 years old. I’d have to get his papers to check it.

John Dowdy:     But from the time he came back from this trainer, up until now it’s been, about how many years do you think?

Jan Culley:        Probably about 9, 10 years.

John Dowdy:     Holy smokes. See, I was thinking as we were talking about this, that it’s like, Oh well that was like six months ago or something. I didn’t know it’s been… So you’ve been dealing with this for nine a good nine years.

Jan Culley:        Yes. And I had somebody that came that fell in love with him and wanted to buy him and I said, “well,” I said, “to be quite honest with you,” I said, “you can try and ride him.” I said, “but I don’t… I think he needs to go away to be trained properly by someone that uses gentle horsemanship.” I said, “as much as I’ve done with him, I haven’t been able to break through.” And she said well let me ride him. I’ll be able to ride him okay. And she got off him and she says, “what in the world?” She said, “I couldn’t make him go.” I said, “exactly.” I said, “so as beautiful as he is” and I mean he is now, he’s back… His body, everything is just amazing. But it’s still the same boy.

John Dowdy:     Okay. So you, so just through being on Facebook, so you came across the Equinity and decided to try this on your boy?

Jan Culley:        Exactly. And the Equinity came and I was giving it to him in the evening before I put him out again. And I just, I didn’t pay a lot of attention because I did not think it would work that fast. And then I started noticing he was playing with one of the other horses and I thought, wow, that’s the first, I’ve not seen him do that.

John Dowdy:     And this was how many days?

Jan Culley:        This was he had been taking it probably about three or four days.

John Dowdy:     Oh wow, okay.

Jan Culley:        And I thought it was probably because it was windy and the other horses were, they all play like that, but he never did. And all of a sudden I see him playing with the youngest horse that I’ve got and I started watching him. And then about probably a week and a half later, I had my young lady here that helps me on a Tuesday and a Saturday. And she came running in, she said, “have you seen Chino?” And I said, “oh no, is he okay?” And I was actually busying myself doing something in here. And she said, “oh, come see, come see.” And when I got there, I said, “I saw them, they were playing and everything.” Then all of a sudden I see Chino flying across the pasture.

Jan Culley:        Full tilt with this youngster behind him. And then they’d stop and they’d run the other way and then they’d come together to each other and you know how they play. And I said, “that is not Chino.” She said, “yes it is.” I said, “Oh my Lord.” I said, “I’ve not got my phone.” And she said, “I have filmed it.”

John Dowdy:     Oh, that’s great.

Jan Culley:        And I’ve seen it happen maybe four or five times since. And of course I haven’t gone to him and tried to groom him or anything in the last since before he started the Equinity because before I did start him, I’d gone into his stall one evening and I started brushing him and a little bit harder than probably than what I have done. And his head came flying round and nearly knocked me senseless and then he backed right into the corner. And when it happened was when I had, was brushing him on the rump again but I didn’t realize basically what I was doing. I was doing it harder than what I normally do, I guess.

Jan Culley:        And so I mean, I was lucky he could have really put me through the wall, but he just basically just backed up into a corner and stood as if to say, are you going to hit me again? So I knew he was hurting and that’s what finally decided me to go ahead and order the Equinety and try it with him. I never had any hopes that it would do anything, to be quite honest with you because there’s so much stuff out there and you can try it all and it doesn’t do anything. So my next plan was to go ahead and start grooming him again and, and see how he responds to like pressure on his rump. But, believe me, I could not… I honestly, I was absolutely dumbfounded that he was running and playing like he was, I have not seen that since he was two years old.

John Dowdy:     Holy smokes. So he’s definitely feeling a lot better now. How long has he been on product up to this point?

Jan Culley:        Well, from when I bought it, well I think it was about the 18th of November when I first sent for the Equinety. So he’s had it every day since then.

John Dowdy:     Okay. So not quite two months.

Jan Culley:        Right, but it’s really totally amazed me, especially with him.

John Dowdy:     Right. Well and to go for, for nine years without really any progress whatsoever.

Jan Culley:        Right, exactly. And that’s what I couldn’t believe. And actually my farrier is a new farrier. Of course, it wasn’t the same one he won’t even give me the time of day because I threatened him. And so my new farrier had come and said to me, “we’re going to do Chino today, right?” And I said, “yeah.” I said, “I’ve got like five trims that we have to do.” So I said, “okay, well let’s start with Chino.” And I said, “okay.” And I thought, well, I hope I can get him in. And we walked up to him. And I put the lead rope around him and he walked with me into the stall. Walked through into the big aisle-way in the farm, in the barn. And he stood there like an angel while the farrier trimmed all his feet.

John Dowdy:     Wow, and this-

Jan Culley:        And he said, “you know what…” This is, let me see, when did he come, Saturday. This was last on Saturday, just gone. And he says, “wow.” He said, “have you looked at his feet?” I said, “well, yeah, I clean them out periodically.” I said, “but it’s just been so bad here it’s like we go swimming, sometimes.” I swim with the fishes, when gets really bad in Guntersville. But He said, “well, his feet, they’re amazing.” And he said “he’s not even bothering about it.” And I said, “well,” I said, “it’s amazing me just looking at him.”

John Dowdy:     Yeah, so you had prior to trying to get him in that really wasn’t an option before?

Jan Culley:        No, not very easily, no. I mean he, I’m basically the only one that’s been able to handle him.

John Dowdy:     That’s incredible.

Jan Culley:        Yeah. So, and it was amazing. Because literally I just… And my husband was actually there also and he says, “wow,” he said, “I’ve never seen Chino so good.” And I said, “I know.” I said, “the farrier has already told me his feet look fabulous.” So I thought, why goodness is this Equinity is a miracle drug or something.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Why? I tell people all the time, it is not a miracle supplement, but, you hear stories like this and you’re like, it’s kind of scratching your head. Now I’ll take a little bit of a timeout here. So anybody that’s tuning in for the first time, maybe you’ve been dealing with just a real challenge of a scenario. Similar I mean, I don’t know how much more challenging you can get then than this story, but there’s plenty of them out there.

John Dowdy:     What the Equinity product is, is 100% pure amino acids, but they’re specifically formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body. And that’s what releases the hormones, which help the body heal at a cellular level. So I think in this case dealing with all the trauma PTSD, I mean who knows what all really happened with this horse. But, for nine years and you have been able to make just very little progress in nine years, which is just incredible. And you edit the Equinity product. You saw changes in days and then he’s out running around and playing and then being able to come in and the farrier for the first time. I mean, that’s pretty incredible.

Jan Culley:        Right? And also this morning I went out to put hay out at seven o’clock and he normally like I told you he normally stands away from the other horses across the creek and I have to walk a little bit to get the hay to him. He was outside there with them this morning, right in the middle of the horses just eating away and it was fine.

Jan Culley:        So it’s every day I see some improvement or something that he’s not done before and it’s incredible. Really.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Well I tell you what, I would love to have a followup podcast in three or six months and where he’s at at that point. That’d be pretty amazing what the progress he’s doing now. So, well I tell ya, if there’s anybody that’s tuning in to the podcast for the first time, maybe they’re a little bit on the fence as to whether to try this product. Because just as you mentioned, there’s a lot of stuff on the market. You can try a lot of stuff. Sometimes it seems like you’re just throwing money away, but with this product in particular other than everything that you’ve already said is there any advice or anything that you could say to them that might convince them to come on over the water’s warm kind of thing?

Jan Culley:        Well, all I can say is I have been totally blown away with what I have seen with Chino, my horse, and I mean I have tried a lot of different products and there are some good products out there, but nothing, absolutely nothing compares to Equinity. And I’ve seen it with my own eyes in a short span of time. I guess I could give an ironclad guarantee that it works. I don’t know.

John Dowdy:     Well, I would say from a horse that you that you’ve had since the beginning and then for nine years after the trauma that it went through and then nine years not able to make any progress or very, very little progress. And then the Equinity product is the only thing that you’ve changed in the last two and a half months. And now with all this progress, you would have to attribute it to that. I mean that’s logic. It’s pretty cut and dry in this scenario.

Jan Culley:        Yeah, absolutely. And like I say on all sides, really on all fronts. Even my farrier he couldn’t believe how great his feet were and he never moved while he was like a statue and let him, let the farrier do everything that he needed to do with him. It was totally amazing.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Now earlier you had mentioned of course when you had found him in that cage or whatever that thing was he had no life in them. When you look at him today, obviously he’s running around and playing and he’s now being, looking like a horse again. What do you see in his eyes? because that’s the biggest telltale sign I think.

Jan Culley:        I see life. I see joy. I see this is what it’s all about. I see him as he was when he was two and a half years old and he was just beautiful. He was majestic and it was… I see what I saw then. So if it’s a cellular level, you’ve given me back my horse.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Oh boy.

Jan Culley:        And cause I could never ever give up on him. People said, “well, why are you still feeding him? Why don’t you just don’t have him anymore. Just get rid of him.” And I said, “no way. No.” And so it’s just something that to me, totally incredible.

John Dowdy:     Right? And I think it’s important to again, with some of the things being out on the market, we’re blessed in the fact that we have a product that works as well as it does. But I think for those tuning in, if you’re really dealing with the situation and we have a lot of stories like this, but if you’ve been down every single path that you can possibly think of, everybody’s scratching their heads, the vet’s scratching their heads, the farrier’s scratching their heads, and there’s mystery stuff going on and you just don’t know what else to do.

John Dowdy:     Please give this a try because I mean, this is one of many stories that as you put it, as a miracle supplement. I tell people that’s not a miracle supplement. But again, hearing stories like this, you have to wonder, but the odds of it working are very, very high. And it’s 100% pure amino acids. There’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches, there’s no loading dose. And amino acids, the only option they have is to work. I mean, they’re the building blocks of protein, so but, well, awesome. Well, Jan Coley out of Alabama. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your story here on the Equinity podcast.

Jan Culley:        Oh, you’re very welcome. And thank you for allowing me to let you know I’ve got my boy back.

John Dowdy:     Oh, that’s great. Well that is awesome. Well, thanks again and we’ll look forward to an update hopefully in three to six months.

Jan Culley:        All right, sounds great.

John Dowdy:     All right, thanks. Bye bye.

Jan Culley:        Thank you so much. Bye. Bye.

 

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Janet Culley – My Horse was Depressed – Abused – Life is Back After 9 years – Happy – Majestic – Running and Playing   - John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're going to swing up into Alabama. Janet Culley – My Horse was Depressed – Abused –<br /> Life is Back After 9 years – Happy – Majestic – Running and Playing<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're going to swing up into Alabama. We've got Jan Coley on the podcast this week, and I'm going to tell you this story is... I'm just going to say it's unbelievable. If you're dealing with this scenario, a situation with your horse that you believe you're boxed in a corner and you don't have anywhere to go, you got to listen to this story. It's absolutely amazing and might even bring a tear or two, because this is the ultimate comeback story, I would say. So without further ado, Jan Coley, welcome to the Equinety Podcast.<br /> <br /> Jan Culley:        Well thank you, and thank you for allowing me to tell my story.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Well, we're excited. As every week, I'm excited to have guests on and to share these stories, and I think this one is probably one of the most intense ones that we've had on. So let's just start from the beginning. Tell us about this horse. Well, let's just start from the beginning.<br /> <br /> Jan Culley:        Okay. I bought Chino in 2006 I believe it was, beautiful horse. And I worked with him every day basically. Then I had someone come up and say, "Well, I know a good person who can train him." He was still a stallion. He was two years old, two and a half years old. I should have queried it more, but he was a farrier. The farrier was a farrier of mine who was very good, and it was his brother that supposedly trained horses. I just took it as it was a good thing.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Sure.<br /> <br /> Jan Culley:        Of course we asked where do we take him, and everything, and made the arrangements and he loaded on the trailer without a problem. He was good as gold and went to this place where there was other horses but nobody around. And I thought, well, this is really strange. I hated to leave him, but they told me to put him in a stall and that they'd be there to work with him. Well, as far as I knew, that's where he was. Of course we took with us two big tubs, the huge tubs of grain for him, what he was having, plus bales of [inaudible 00:02:48]. So he had plenty of food and everything, and I never heard anything. So I called the farrier and I said, "Hey, your brother, is your brother working with Chino? What's going on?" And he says, "well, yeah, I said he had to move him." And I said, "really? Now where to?" And he said, "well to where he lived which was even... which was quite a ways away.<br /> <br /> Jan Culley:        So I said, "well, I'd like to come and see him." Well he said, "well, he needs to just have at least a week to work with them, et cetera and so on." And he said, "and then after that it you are more than welcome to go and see him." So I guess some people they don't like anybody to be there that first week. So I said, "well okay, would you ask him to call me please?" And anyway, never got a call. And then I called the guy again and I said, "look, I need to go and see the horse. And he said, "well, here's my dad's number if you call him first and then he can give you directions." Well, I called the father and he said, "well, can you leave it another week?" He said, "we're really working with him right now." And I said, "no." I said, "I need to come and see him right now." This was like three weeks after.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Wow.<br /> <br /> Jan Culley:        Must have been going on the fourth week. And so I got the address and everything and he says, "why don't you just leave it a few more days?" I said, "no, I'm coming right now." And we left and got there and I was almost sick. He was skin and bone. He was stood this cage like thing. I don't know what they used it for. It's still a lot. And he had a saddle on and that saddle had apparently been on him for days.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Holy cow. John Dowdy 31:28
056 – Elizabeth Welch – Severe Foundered Horse – Significant Sole Depth – Laminitis – IR – Picky Eater https://www.teamequinety.com/056-elizabeth-welch-severe-foundered-horse-significant-sole-depth-laminitis-ir-picky-eater/ Wed, 25 Mar 2020 13:00:34 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1917 Elizabeth Welch – Severe Foundered Horse – Significant Sole Depth – Laminitis – IR – Picky Eater   John Dowdy: Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. We are swinging up in the great state of South Carolina. We've got Elizabeth Welch on the coldest week. Elizabeth, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Elizabeth Welch: Hi. Thanks for having me. John Dowdy: Well, it's always a pleasure. We're always excited and welcome, welcome. So let's talk a little bit about your background. You're in the hunters and the jumper world. How long have you been doing that? Elizabeth Welch: Oh gosh, pretty much since I was a kid. I started out doing the Hunters and I've dabbled in some other disciplines, but I always come back to the hunter jumpers. And then I got into the jumpers when I was probably in my late twenties, early thirties, somewhere in there. And I've been kind of doing both ever since. John Dowdy: Well, fantastic. And one of the reasons I reached out to you specifically is you had sent, or actually had posted, I think originally, kind of a testimonial. You'd commented on one of our Facebook ads about a mare that was foundered and you had noted that you could see a definite improvement in the feet or hooves and significant increase in soul depth. So I had reached out to you and you had sent some radiographs and things, and I asked for your permission to post those as an ad, which have been running for quite some time. John Dowdy: And although you were a bit apprehensive about doing the podcast, I sweet talked you into it, I think. So here we are. Elizabeth Welch: Here we are. John Dowdy: But one of the interesting things, I always find this a humorous myself, because you always have people that they comment on these things and here we're talking radiographs. And there's a lot of people like, "Oh my gosh, thank you so much for sharing." Because they're dealing with similar issues. We're talking about a foundered horse, and as we were chatting prior to recording, you also let me know this horse, it actually had IR and laminitis, picky eater, everything kind of hit at once. John Dowdy: But in regards to the actual x-rays that we are showing, of course you have naysayers, which I think are in any niche out there, that are saying there is no way that these are the same x-rays. And of course, you've been doing your best jumping in there, "Hey, these are mine and I've got a whole catalog..." And yada, yada, yada. But let's go back to the beginning of what this horse... I mean, it was perfectly fine. Then one day, it started showing signs of an abscess, but tell us what was going on and what happened from the beginning and about what the timeframe was on this? Elizabeth Welch: So it was roughly the end of September of last year, 2019, and the horse just sort of became acutely lame, but it was really concentrated in her right front and it really just presented like a horse that seemed like it was going to blow an abscess. The horse became acutely lame and it was lame in one foot. She never presented like a laminitis horse at the time. She never looked rocked back, never was trying to get all the weight off the front feet. So for a couple of days, we said, oh well, looks like she's going to have an abscess. And we kind of treated her like she was going to have a foot abscess. Elizabeth Welch: Obviously, it didn't seem like it was getting better. So I had already consulted with the vet and I said, "Well, let's have the vet obviously come out and take a look at this." And if it is an abscess, see if we can figure out where it is and try to get that treatment happening. And if it's not, what the problem is. So obviously my vet came out and did some diagnostics on the horse and that is unfortunately when we took radiographs and then found out that she does have rotation. She had rotation in both front feet, worse in the right than the left. Elizabeth Welch:

Elizabeth Welch – Severe Foundered Horse –
Significant Sole Depth – Laminitis – IR – Picky Eater

 

John Dowdy:

Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. We are swinging up in the great state of South Carolina. We’ve got Elizabeth Welch on the coldest week. Elizabeth, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Elizabeth Welch:

Hi. Thanks for having me.

John Dowdy:

Well, it’s always a pleasure. We’re always excited and welcome, welcome. So let’s talk a little bit about your background. You’re in the hunters and the jumper world. How long have you been doing that?

Elizabeth Welch:

Oh gosh, pretty much since I was a kid. I started out doing the Hunters and I’ve dabbled in some other disciplines, but I always come back to the hunter jumpers. And then I got into the jumpers when I was probably in my late twenties, early thirties, somewhere in there. And I’ve been kind of doing both ever since.

John Dowdy:

Well, fantastic. And one of the reasons I reached out to you specifically is you had sent, or actually had posted, I think originally, kind of a testimonial. You’d commented on one of our Facebook ads about a mare that was foundered and you had noted that you could see a definite improvement in the feet or hooves and significant increase in soul depth. So I had reached out to you and you had sent some radiographs and things, and I asked for your permission to post those as an ad, which have been running for quite some time.

John Dowdy:

And although you were a bit apprehensive about doing the podcast, I sweet talked you into it, I think. So here we are.

Elizabeth Welch:

Here we are.

John Dowdy:

But one of the interesting things, I always find this a humorous myself, because you always have people that they comment on these things and here we’re talking radiographs. And there’s a lot of people like, “Oh my gosh, thank you so much for sharing.” Because they’re dealing with similar issues. We’re talking about a foundered horse, and as we were chatting prior to recording, you also let me know this horse, it actually had IR and laminitis, picky eater, everything kind of hit at once.

John Dowdy:

But in regards to the actual x-rays that we are showing, of course you have naysayers, which I think are in any niche out there, that are saying there is no way that these are the same x-rays. And of course, you’ve been doing your best jumping in there, “Hey, these are mine and I’ve got a whole catalog…” And yada, yada, yada. But let’s go back to the beginning of what this horse… I mean, it was perfectly fine. Then one day, it started showing signs of an abscess, but tell us what was going on and what happened from the beginning and about what the timeframe was on this?

Elizabeth Welch:

So it was roughly the end of September of last year, 2019, and the horse just sort of became acutely lame, but it was really concentrated in her right front and it really just presented like a horse that seemed like it was going to blow an abscess. The horse became acutely lame and it was lame in one foot. She never presented like a laminitis horse at the time. She never looked rocked back, never was trying to get all the weight off the front feet. So for a couple of days, we said, oh well, looks like she’s going to have an abscess. And we kind of treated her like she was going to have a foot abscess.

Elizabeth Welch:

Obviously, it didn’t seem like it was getting better. So I had already consulted with the vet and I said, “Well, let’s have the vet obviously come out and take a look at this.” And if it is an abscess, see if we can figure out where it is and try to get that treatment happening. And if it’s not, what the problem is. So obviously my vet came out and did some diagnostics on the horse and that is unfortunately when we took radiographs and then found out that she does have rotation. She had rotation in both front feet, worse in the right than the left.

Elizabeth Welch:

And then of course it was like, yikes. So then we had to come up with a completely different plan because it wasn’t an abscess, so.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. So finding out that it was founder, but then you also found out she was IR, had the laminitis and all these things just kind of all hit at once.

Elizabeth Welch:

Right. Well, we didn’t know she had IRR at the time. And we were trying to figure out why maybe this horse might’ve developed laminitis. So one of the things that we did is we pulled some blood work on her and that is obviously how we found out that she actually had IR. So our best educated assumption is that the horse had developed IR and then because we didn’t have a horse on a feed regimen and care program that’s suitable for an IR horse, that it probably just caused the laminitis to happen.

Elizabeth Welch:

So obviously once we knew that she had IR, we immediately made changes to her diet and her lifestyle and all of the things that you would do for a horse that has IR. And then of course on top of that, then we’re now trying to treat the horse who has laminitis, so.

John Dowdy:

A myriad of fun things to try to work out all at once.

Elizabeth Welch:

Unfortunately, yes.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. So in the course of all of this happening, and of course you’re doing research online and then you found one of the… Or I guess it found you, one of the mini ads that we have strolling across people’s timeline. What initially caught your eye with that?

Elizabeth Welch:

Well, I think I had seen some ads for your product on my Facebook feed before. There’s always different ads, especially since I’m a horse person. So lots of horse related things come across and one had caught my eye. I don’t remember specifically which one, but there was an ad that was someone talking about a foundered horse and the product they felt had helped improve the quality of the foot and help the horse grow some better foot. So then obviously I took a look a little closer. I looked at your Facebook page, looked at your website, did a little research and looked at the ingredients.

Elizabeth Welch:

And one of the things that was appealing to me was, there was no sugar, no fillers. It’s something that’s safe to feed an IR horse because that was obviously important. And then I said, well, let me take a chance. I’ll buy some of the product and try it out. I mean, obviously we already had the mare on a plan that we were following with my vet, with my farrier and all those things. And I said, well, maybe just add this. And I obviously asked my vet about it and they said, “Hey, it sounds like there shouldn’t be a reason you shouldn’t feed this, so why not?”

Elizabeth Welch:

And so I said, well, worst case scenario is it doesn’t do anything. Or if it helps, then that’s awesome. So I figured I’d just go ahead and buy some and give it a try.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. Now, your mare is also a very picky eater. So what’d you find-

Elizabeth Welch:

Oh yes. Yeah, she’s one of those that if you put something in the food that she doesn’t like, she will not eat it. She won’t eventually eat it, she will not eat it at all. She would rather starve and that’s it. If you want to give her things that she doesn’t like to eat, you’ve got to paste and syringe it in the mouth. I had to do that for a long time with a lot of the meds we were doing with the vet because you’d put it in the food and she said, nope, not happening. [crosstalk 00:07:28].

John Dowdy:

Yeah. And what’d you find with the Equinety product?

Elizabeth Welch:

No issue at all. I mean, I put it in the food as soon as I got the product and tried it out, put it in there and no issue. I mean, not even a sniff and a hesitation. I mean, she just ate it, so I said, “Great.”

John Dowdy:

Yeah.

Elizabeth Welch:

Even better.

John Dowdy:

Absolutely. Yeah, we found that a lot. A lot of the picky eaters tend to lick it right up. Every now and then, you do have a… Or we found a really stubborn one, and so the solution to that we found, of course some people would syringe it, maybe a little applesauce or coconut oil or any kind of an oil or something to kind of mask it. But it’s typically not a longterm thing that you have to do that either. It’s typically just to get them going. But we rarely have any horses that refuse to eat it because the amino acids are kind of salty by nature anyways. So-

Elizabeth Welch:

I feed-

John Dowdy:

Go ahead.

Elizabeth Welch:

So I feed her beet pulp as well. So I mean that helps to kind of mix it in. And I mean, I’m doing a no sugar, no molasses beet pulp obviously, for the IR horse. And actually all the horses get no sugar, no molasses beat pulp. But that clearly gives another way to kind of mix it in so it sticks and it can’t be sifted out.

John Dowdy:

Right. Yep. So up to this point, you starting the Equinety and then how long was it before you started seeing some results with that?

Elizabeth Welch:

So I don’t remember an exact date, but we had trouble getting her right front, in particular, stabilized with the rotation. We got the left front stabilize pretty quickly and the right front, just despite all of the things we were doing, that one, the rotation kind of kept getting worse and worse and worse. And she also has always been very flatfooted and thin soled. So she didn’t really have a lot of playroom and the sole anyway. And by probably mid October, it was pretty scary. I mean, the tip of the coffin bone was really close to the bottom of the foot and very scary.

Elizabeth Welch:

So that’s when I started on the Equinety, it was right around that time when it was super scary radiographs. And at that time, since she was still very new with the rotation and we were probably taking radiographs, having the vet come out a couple of times a week. So we were taking radiographs pretty regularly of the feet a couple of times a week there for a while. I would say for sure, within 30 days, we noticed the difference. Maybe even a little sooner, I’d have to go back and look through all the radiographs that I had for an exact timeline.

Elizabeth Welch:

But I’d say for sure within the 30 days, there was a noticeable difference in the sole depth, not necessarily with the rotation per se, but a noticeable increase in the sole depth, which is obviously good because then the fear of having the bone come out of the bottom of the foot went away. And for sure within 60 days, I mean, there was a massive amount of sole depth. I mean, it was pretty amazing. I don’t know that without the radiographs, if it hadn’t been my horse and I was having the vet out there and we were taking radiographs all the time, and I was watching it, it was pretty unbelievable.

Elizabeth Welch:

So I think I would’ve had a hard time believing it myself if it wasn’t my own personal horse that it was happening to and I had all of those pictures kind of as proof and as a timeline. And the interesting thing is adding the Equinety was the only thing that we had done different at the time. I mean, we hadn’t made any other changes to the already prescribed vet program that we were on. So even my vet and farrier were like, wow, it’s pretty interesting.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. Right. Well I think it’s important to let people know as well that are tuning in, maybe for the first time, maybe they’ve kind of been seeing the product around and not sure exactly what it is. I’ll spend just a brief moment and just kind of give you a cliff note’s version of those tuning in. So the Equinety product is 100% pure amino acids. So there’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches, and there’s no loading dose. Serving size is 5.2 grams, which is not quite a tablespoon. But what’s really unique about this product outside of things, the amino acids are specifically formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body.

John Dowdy:

And whether it’s a tiny mini horse or a draft horse, they all get the same dose because the pituitary is roughly the same size in mammals, is about the size of a pea, and the pituitary gland, once stimulated, releases the necessary hormones which help the body heal at a cellular level. So you could have 50 or 100 horses and giving all the Equinety. And because we’re giving the body what it needs to release its own hormones, it’s that horse’s body that’s sending the hormones to the problem areas. So in this particular case, we’re talking about a very thin soled foundered horse.

John Dowdy:

And in 30 days, and definitely by 60 days, you had noticed a significant sole depth increase, which is vitally important for foundered horse. What other things? Of course you were dealing with laminitis. What other benefits have you seen since using the product now outside of the increased sole depth?

Elizabeth Welch:

Well, interestingly enough, I was impressed with the products for this horse and obviously doing my research and looking, the product has many benefits in addition to helping the feet. You obviously read the label and it talks about how it’s good for joints, it’s good for soft tissue, good for bones, good for relaxation and focus and recovery for horses, your performance sources. And I said, well, I’m going to try it out on another horse. So I started giving it to my personal show horse kind of as an experiment just to see. And since then, I’ve actually got a lot of horses in my barn on it because I really liked the product and kind of believed in it.

Elizabeth Welch:

So the couple of things I would say for all the horses across the board, let’s see, we’ve got seven horses on it now in my barn. And I would definitely say across the board, all the horses have been noticeably more relaxed and more focused. I definitely would agree with the writing on the label. That’s across the board, all the horses seem that way. I would definitely say all the horses, I think their coats look really nice. One of my customers has a pony who’s still got a decent coat, not a bad coat by any means, but the pony was on the product for about 30 days and we recently gave it a body clip, it was time to go to a show.

Elizabeth Welch:

And I mean, the pony looks amazing. She’s super shiny, super dappily. I mean, her coat’s super. I mean, it’s the best it’s ever looked. I would say all the horses’ feet looks really good. I mean, just overall the horses look really good.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. And I would say that’s very typical for those using the product or all the things that you’re describing. And ultimately, it’s helping to balance the horse from the inside out. So there’s all these nice benefits that come along. People in the show horse industry, they definitely like the softer, shinier coats. A lot of horses will dapple out, fill out, top line, things like that. And of course, they all give us feedback of how the hooves are healthier, stronger, faster growing. And I think it’s also important to note, this Equinety product is not a miracle supplement.

John Dowdy:

It’s not the end all, be all. One of the examples I give, as you described with this mare, you’re dealing with to some pretty significant issues going on with the founder thin sole, the laminitis, and of course the IR. But you’ve got a great medical team with your vet, your farrier. You’re doing all the things that you know to do. And one of the examples I give is you could have the greatest farrier on the planet standing in front of your horse, but if there’s nothing to work with and you’ve got a super thin sole, what is the farrier supposed to do here?

John Dowdy:

I mean, he doesn’t really have much to work with. And so one of the great things with this Equinety Horse XL product is it helps grow a healthier, stronger hoof. And so ultimately, what it’s doing, it’s giving your farrier more to work with in a shorter amount of time. So I think one of the best examples I’ve come up with is no matter what you’re dealing with, challenges with your horse and even a lot of mystery lameness things, it seems to us with all the feedback that we get, is this Equinety Horse XL product, it really ends up being that missing little puzzle piece that you’re looking for when everybody else can’t seem to figure out what’s going on.

John Dowdy:

Or you’re scratching your head, or maybe you’ve tried everything under the sun and nothing else seems to be working. Just jump on board and do what you did. It’s like, hey, if it doesn’t work, you’re not out a lot of money. But the odds of this not working are nil to none because they are amino acids, they have to work. So-

Elizabeth Welch:

I agree.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. Yeah. But well, that-

Elizabeth Welch:

It’s logical and makes sense. So, yeah.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. No, that’s awesome. Well, if there’s anybody tuning in that might be on the fence, other than everything that you’ve already described, is there anything that you could tell them to maybe give it a try?

Elizabeth Welch:

I mean, pretty much that’s just it. I mean, it’s not going to hurt to give it a try. I mean, what I did, being a precautious person that I am and like to do my homework and research, you can buy little samples of your product. So I bought the samples because I said, well, let’s make sure the horse will actually eat it. Let’s make sure that I like it before I commit to buying a bigger tub. But even if you buy a bigger tub, when you do the math and break it down, it’s not that much per month, because I’ve certainly read some comments where people say it’s really expensive and I’m like, well, the tub is basically $100 and some change.

Elizabeth Welch:

It’s a hundred servings, you give one serving a day over a three month supply. So it’s like $35 a month. And I mean, go look at any other joint supplements, skin and coat supplements, any sort of metabolic supplement, any supplement on the market, you’re going to pay at least that, if not more. And especially for a supplement like this that’s a combination supplement that helps lots of things, versus you’ve got to buy your joint supplement and your [inaudible 00:18:41] supplement, and your [inaudible 00:18:43] supplement. I mean, it really isn’t that expensive. I mean, you’ve got to buy the tub up front, but when you do the bath, it’s not a big deal really.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. I mean, it really comes out to a dollar a day. I mean, there’s a hundred plus servings in there, so it’s very, very economical. We try to price it so anybody could afford it. Now, the last thing before I let you go on here. As I mentioned in the front part of this podcast, with the ads that we’re running and we have the before and after of those radiographs, how many radiographs would you say that you’ve taken since the beginning on this mare?

Elizabeth Welch:

I’d have to double check. I’ve probably got at least 30 now, if not a few more, somewhere in there.

John Dowdy:

Yep. Well, and I had noted that quite a few naysayers and there’s people that have been around for years and years and years, farriers and old timers will say that they look at this, and I don’t blame them, it’s too good to be true because there’s nothing on the market like this product. I mean, we’re blessed in that fact. So what would you say to them that might be questioning just the radiographs of before and after and anything you would like to put to bed or put to rest on those things?

Elizabeth Welch:

Well, I mean, as you correctly pointed out, there’s always going to be people that are interested. There’s always going to be people that are doubters and non-believers. And I think as I mentioned before, I might not have believed it myself if I didn’t have my own radiographs on my own horse that I looked at with my own eyes and had watched the progression because it is pretty unbelievable, the difference it made in my particular horse, and clearly I can’t attest that it would do that for everybody’s horse, but my horse, it’s made a noticeable difference.

Elizabeth Welch:

I mean, I don’t know what else to say other than you’d just have to try it to see if you liked it and if you believed in it. And I’ve got tons and tons of radiographs to back it up and I work very closely with my vet and my farrier, and they’ve witnessed it with their own eyes, so.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, not much else to say on that, I think.

Elizabeth Welch:

That’s all there is to it.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, that’s awesome. Well, if you’re dealing with a situation where you need some help with your horses’ hooves, thicken soles, faster, stronger, healthier, growing hooves or just overall body condition, soft tissue repair. I mean, all these things, you can find out more information on our website, which is teamequanimity.com. And Elizabeth Welch from South Carolina, thank you so much for taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast.

Elizabeth Welch:

You’re welcome. Thanks so much for having me

John Dowdy:

All right. Thank you. Bye bye.

Elizabeth Welch:

Bye bye.

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Elizabeth Welch – Severe Foundered Horse – Significant Sole Depth – Laminitis – IR – Picky Eater   - John Dowdy: - Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. We are swinging up in the great state of South Carolina. Elizabeth Welch – Severe Foundered Horse –<br /> Significant Sole Depth – Laminitis – IR – Picky Eater<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. We are swinging up in the great state of South Carolina. We've got Elizabeth Welch on the coldest week. Elizabeth, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Welch:<br /> <br /> Hi. Thanks for having me.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Well, it's always a pleasure. We're always excited and welcome, welcome. So let's talk a little bit about your background. You're in the hunters and the jumper world. How long have you been doing that?<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Welch:<br /> <br /> Oh gosh, pretty much since I was a kid. I started out doing the Hunters and I've dabbled in some other disciplines, but I always come back to the hunter jumpers. And then I got into the jumpers when I was probably in my late twenties, early thirties, somewhere in there. And I've been kind of doing both ever since.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Well, fantastic. And one of the reasons I reached out to you specifically is you had sent, or actually had posted, I think originally, kind of a testimonial. You'd commented on one of our Facebook ads about a mare that was foundered and you had noted that you could see a definite improvement in the feet or hooves and significant increase in soul depth. So I had reached out to you and you had sent some radiographs and things, and I asked for your permission to post those as an ad, which have been running for quite some time.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> And although you were a bit apprehensive about doing the podcast, I sweet talked you into it, I think. So here we are.<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Welch:<br /> <br /> Here we are.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> But one of the interesting things, I always find this a humorous myself, because you always have people that they comment on these things and here we're talking radiographs. And there's a lot of people like, "Oh my gosh, thank you so much for sharing." Because they're dealing with similar issues. We're talking about a foundered horse, and as we were chatting prior to recording, you also let me know this horse, it actually had IR and laminitis, picky eater, everything kind of hit at once.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> But in regards to the actual x-rays that we are showing, of course you have naysayers, which I think are in any niche out there, that are saying there is no way that these are the same x-rays. And of course, you've been doing your best jumping in there, "Hey, these are mine and I've got a whole catalog..." And yada, yada, yada. But let's go back to the beginning of what this horse... I mean, it was perfectly fine. Then one day, it started showing signs of an abscess, but tell us what was going on and what happened from the beginning and about what the timeframe was on this?<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Welch:<br /> <br /> So it was roughly the end of September of last year, 2019, and the horse just sort of became acutely lame, but it was really concentrated in her right front and it really just presented like a horse that seemed like it was going to blow an abscess. The horse became acutely lame and it was lame in one foot. She never presented like a laminitis horse at the time. She never looked rocked back, never was trying to get all the weight off the front feet. So for a couple of days, we said, oh well, looks like she's going to have an abscess. And we kind of treated her like she was going to have a foot abscess.<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Welch:<br /> <br /> Obviously, it didn't seem like it was getting better. So I had already consulted with the vet and I said, "Well, let's have the vet obviously come out and take a look at this." And if it is an abscess, see if we can figure out where it is and try to get that treatment happening. And if it's not, John Dowdy 22:47
054 – Monica Kay – Softer Shinier coat, stronger hooves, muscle tone, more focused, faster recovery https://www.teamequinety.com/054-monica-kay-softer-shinier-coat-stronger-hooves-muscle-tone-more-focused-faster-recovery/ Wed, 18 Mar 2020 13:00:22 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1909   Monica Kay - Softer Shinier coat, stronger hooves, muscle tone, more focused, faster recovery   John Dowdy: Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We are going to swing up into Ohio and we've got Monica Kay on the podcast this week. Monica, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Monica Kay: Hello, thanks for having me. John Dowdy: Oh, you bet. It's a pleasure. We're excited to have another guest on this week. I first came across your posting. You actually had listed a review or posted a review on our Facebook page and it simply said, let me find it here, "We've had great results with our mare on Equinety. Such a difference in her coat, hooves and muscle tone, highly recommended." Now that was short and sweet, but the pictures you posted, tell a completely different story. For example, and we're going to have this posted on our website below this podcast so you can see the before and after photos, and not only was the coat dull to shiny, but the hooves, I think were the biggest difference. Although the before pictures were in wintertime, you could see that the hooves were ripply and kind of flared at the bottom and the after pictures looks like in the spring and sunlight, but you can see a significant difference in the hooves. Let's go back and how did you find this horse? What was going on with it when you first found it? Let's just start there. Monica Kay: Okay. Well, we found this horse that was for sale. We really didn't have the intentions of buying a horse, didn't really need another horse, but when we seen the condition that the horse was in underweight, its hooves hadn't seen a farrier in a year. It became a rescue mission where we knew that we had to get the horse out of that situation and start taking care of her. We did end up buying the horse and we noticed she had a little bit of speed on her and thought, "Well, maybe she could be my daughter's next speed horse or contester." John Dowdy: Right, and she's interested in barrels and poles and things of that nature. Monica Kay: Right. Correct, correct. John Dowdy: Yeah, so when you got her home, obviously, you had mentioned she was kind of a rescue mission at this point, but so we would assume you probably vet checked and started putting a feed and nutrition to her. What kind of changes were you seeing just by doing that? Monica Kay: I mean, she started just the feed. She started putting on some weight, but I mean her coat still kind of looked dull. We got the farrier out right away to trim her feet and they still just, I mean, even being trimmed, they would grow funny. They had these ripples to them, they just did not look healthy. John Dowdy: Mm-hmm (affirmative), and then someone mentioned a product called Equinety Horse XL. Tell us about that. Monica Kay: Mm-hmm (affirmative), so a lady at one of the barns that I know, she has an older horse that was having some lameness and she started him on Equinety and noticed a difference that he wasn't as stiff, and she mentioned it. Then we had been talking to Danielle Bowser and she mentioned that all their horses are on Equinety so we thought, "You know what, we're going to try it. People rave about it," so we just took the leap of faith and got some Equinety. John Dowdy: Awesome, and how long were you using the product before you started noticing changes? Monica Kay: Within a few weeks, I would say to notice the changes, especially in her personality and her muscle tone and her coat, health slowly came on too. I mean, I would say within a few months all of it came together and we noticed a huge difference. When we first got her, we would be saddling her and she would rear up and flip over or trying to take her into a chute at a show, she would rear up and just ... I mean, she's a ball of energy in the first place, but it was a safety risk. John Dowdy: Sure, sure. Now, you said that you noticed changes in a couple of weeks.

 

Monica Kay – Softer Shinier coat, stronger hooves,
muscle tone, more focused, faster recovery

 

John Dowdy:

Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We are going to swing up into Ohio and we’ve got Monica Kay on the podcast this week. Monica, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Monica Kay:

Hello, thanks for having me.

John Dowdy:

Oh, you bet. It’s a pleasure. We’re excited to have another guest on this week. I first came across your posting. You actually had listed a review or posted a review on our Facebook page and it simply said, let me find it here, “We’ve had great results with our mare on Equinety. Such a difference in her coat, hooves and muscle tone, highly recommended.” Now that was short and sweet, but the pictures you posted, tell a completely different story. For example, and we’re going to have this posted on our website below this podcast so you can see the before and after photos, and not only was the coat dull to shiny, but the hooves, I think were the biggest difference. Although the before pictures were in wintertime, you could see that the hooves were ripply and kind of flared at the bottom and the after pictures looks like in the spring and sunlight, but you can see a significant difference in the hooves. Let’s go back and how did you find this horse? What was going on with it when you first found it? Let’s just start there.

Monica Kay:

Okay. Well, we found this horse that was for sale. We really didn’t have the intentions of buying a horse, didn’t really need another horse, but when we seen the condition that the horse was in underweight, its hooves hadn’t seen a farrier in a year. It became a rescue mission where we knew that we had to get the horse out of that situation and start taking care of her. We did end up buying the horse and we noticed she had a little bit of speed on her and thought, “Well, maybe she could be my daughter’s next speed horse or contester.”

John Dowdy:

Right, and she’s interested in barrels and poles and things of that nature.

Monica Kay:

Right. Correct, correct.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, so when you got her home, obviously, you had mentioned she was kind of a rescue mission at this point, but so we would assume you probably vet checked and started putting a feed and nutrition to her. What kind of changes were you seeing just by doing that?

Monica Kay:

I mean, she started just the feed. She started putting on some weight, but I mean her coat still kind of looked dull. We got the farrier out right away to trim her feet and they still just, I mean, even being trimmed, they would grow funny. They had these ripples to them, they just did not look healthy.

John Dowdy:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), and then someone mentioned a product called Equinety Horse XL. Tell us about that.

Monica Kay:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), so a lady at one of the barns that I know, she has an older horse that was having some lameness and she started him on Equinety and noticed a difference that he wasn’t as stiff, and she mentioned it. Then we had been talking to Danielle Bowser and she mentioned that all their horses are on Equinety so we thought, “You know what, we’re going to try it. People rave about it,” so we just took the leap of faith and got some Equinety.

John Dowdy:

Awesome, and how long were you using the product before you started noticing changes?

Monica Kay:

Within a few weeks, I would say to notice the changes, especially in her personality and her muscle tone and her coat, health slowly came on too. I mean, I would say within a few months all of it came together and we noticed a huge difference. When we first got her, we would be saddling her and she would rear up and flip over or trying to take her into a chute at a show, she would rear up and just … I mean, she’s a ball of energy in the first place, but it was a safety risk.

John Dowdy:

Sure, sure. Now, you said that you noticed changes in a couple of weeks. I’ll take a quick little pause here because those tuning in for the first time, maybe you’re wondering what this Equinety product exactly is or you’ve seen it around but don’t know exactly what it is and and how can it do all these different things? Well, the Equinety Horse XL’s 100% pure amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein, but the specific combination of aminos are formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body. That’s what releases the necessary hormones, which then help heal at a cellular level. This product actually starts working in 24 hours. It’s just a matter of what you can start to see. In this case, you actually started seeing changes within a couple of weeks and by within a few months, everything was really blooming and filling out. I would say the vast majority of people do notice changes in 30 days or less. In this case, it was a couple of weeks. Now how long did you have the horse and with the feeding program and all the care and everything prior to using the Equinety product?

Monica Kay:

I would say a few months, maybe four months or so. Well, we got her in March, so we started in the summertime on Equinety.

John Dowdy:

Okay, gotcha. Once you put the nutrition and doing all the care and maintenance that you would typically do, but then when you added the Equinety, everything just went into supercharge mode really is kind of what-

Monica Kay:

Right, right.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, and then going into kind of the safety precautions where she’d rear up or go into the chute and [inaudible 00:06:09], which is a very dangerous thing, so you noticed once you added the Equinety, that her whole attitude, demeanor changed. Tell us about that.

Monica Kay:

Right, right. I mean, she’ll walk in the chute or into arena, none of the rearing. I mean, when she gets out there and sees the pattern, she gets ready to run. That’s just her, she knows her job, but it’s not dangerous. It’s the horse getting ready to do what it knows what its job is. With my daughter, that’s a big thing of safety. I’d hate to watch her rear up and flip over. I would be afraid that would ever happen with my daughter in the saddle. Now we don’t have to worry about that. She prances in and is ready to go. No issues.

John Dowdy:

What kind of times is she running barrels and poles?

Monica Kay:

Well, they actually made it to state this year in 4H for barrels and poles. She, down at state, if she wouldn’t have knocked a barrel, she ran a 17-second pattern on barrels and she will hit 20-second pole patterns on a good day.

John Dowdy:

Wow. Yeah, so in the barrels, she’s running two, three D depending on the-

Monica Kay:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

John Dowdy:

Yeah, that’s incredible. I mean, you take a horse, so one year on Equinety and you take a horse that was in a very bad situation, skin and bones, hooves hadn’t been touched in a year and now running these kind of times in. That’s impressive. Now I’ll throw this out there too, because the Equinety product I tell people all the time is not a miracle supplement. It sure does some miraculous things. This is one of the reasons why we have these podcasts because the stories are just crazy, but it’s so important that the owner is doing everything that they need to do on their side, which is what you are doing and it’s just when you add the Equinety of product, it seems to fill in all those gaps that seem to be missing. Now have you had a … this is a bit of a leading question because you already told me this so, “Hey, have you heard?” You had mentioned to me earlier that you’ve had some people say, “Oh, that Equinety, that’s pretty expensive,” but what do you tell them?

Monica Kay:

I always tell them, I mean, the number of servings that you get out of the container is worth it. Especially when you see the results. I mean for us, the results were amazing and it’s well worth it. I would pay double the price honestly, for the results that we got and just to the test the results, I got a similar amino acid product and put our other horse on it and I don’t see the results like I do with Equinety and our barrel horse.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. Now let’s back that up a little bit because now as far as price goes, it’s $99.99 and you get 100 servings, so it’s a dollar a day per horse. There’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches, there’s no loading dose. A serving size is 5.2 grams, which is not quite a tablespoon. It doesn’t matter if it’s a tiny mini or a draft horse, they all get the same dose because we’re targeting the pituitary gland, which is roughly the same size. That’ll fill in some gaps there as far as … I think the people that say, “Oh, well that’s too expensive because it’s $100,” I think a lot of people assume it’s only 30 days, but it’s actually a little over three months. For the person that told you that, “Oh, well those are just amino acids,” it wasn’t that kind of a conversation?

Monica Kay:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Right. They said, “You’re just paying for amino acids. That’s all it is.” I tested the theory, like I said, and I got a product, tried it on our other horse and the results aren’t anything close to what we’ve seen with Equinety.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, and I think it’s important for people and we try to do our best from the educational standpoint that because Equinety Horse XL is so unique and there’s nothing like it on the market, and if you’re learning about this for the first time that the biggest difference with this product is the amino acids are specifically combined and formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland. That’s what its purpose is. Typically horses, they have joint issues, then you look at joint supplements or possible injections or if they have hoof issues, and you look at hoof supplements and creative shoeing, or if they have attitude issues, you look at calming supplements or muscle building supplements or gut supplements. It’s a supplement or medication for each individual problem or issue you’re having. The unique thing with this product, because we’re giving the body what it needs to simulate the pituitary gland to release its own hormones, and then it’s the horse’s body that sending those hormones to the problem areas and the body knows exactly where the problem areas are because it’s its own body. You could have 12 horses with 12 different things going on and then essentially, it’s going to customize to each horse. With your little test that you did, have you put that particular horse on the Equinety product since then?

Monica Kay:

Nope, he’s about to go on it.

John Dowdy:

Okay. Well, you’ll have to keep us updated.

Monica Kay:

He is about to go on it.

John Dowdy:

Yep. Well, you’ll have to keep us updated on that one. Yeah, for sure. Well, that is awesome. Well, Monica, I really appreciate you taking the time to share your story. If there’s anybody tuning in this podcast for the first time, maybe they’re on the fence, should I try it? Should I not try it? Is there anything that you could suggest to them or say to them that might tell them to come on over? The water’s warm, so to speak.

Monica Kay:

Oh yeah. Oh yeah. I mean, it’s definitely worth it. I would not go with any other supplement, honestly. It’s our only supplement. That’s all I have to say. I mean it just, we haven’t had any lameness issues. We haven’t had any colic, any founder. I mean, we hear of all these horses around the area having all these issues and there’s miss Ellie Mae standing out in the pasture just fat and happy.

John Dowdy:

Now you could just have a good bloodline of a horse there. I’ll throw that out there, but I’m sure the Equinety is helping though. Everything you just said, Equinety did not pay you to say that. Just for-

Monica Kay:

Nope. Nope.

John Dowdy:

Awesome. All right, well Monica Kay out of Ohio, Monica Kay out of Ohio, thank you so much for sharing your story here on the Equinety podcast.

Monica Kay:

All right. Thank you for having me. Have a great day.

John Dowdy:

Okay, you too. Bye-bye.

Monica Kay:

Thank you. Bye.

 

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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  Monica Kay - Softer Shinier coat, stronger hooves, muscle tone, more focused, faster recovery   - John Dowdy: - Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We are going to swing up into Ohio and we've got Monica Kay on the podcast this we...  <br /> Monica Kay - Softer Shinier coat, stronger hooves,<br /> muscle tone, more focused, faster recovery<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We are going to swing up into Ohio and we've got Monica Kay on the podcast this week. Monica, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Monica Kay:<br /> <br /> Hello, thanks for having me.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Oh, you bet. It's a pleasure. We're excited to have another guest on this week. I first came across your posting. You actually had listed a review or posted a review on our Facebook page and it simply said, let me find it here, "We've had great results with our mare on Equinety. Such a difference in her coat, hooves and muscle tone, highly recommended." Now that was short and sweet, but the pictures you posted, tell a completely different story. For example, and we're going to have this posted on our website below this podcast so you can see the before and after photos, and not only was the coat dull to shiny, but the hooves, I think were the biggest difference. Although the before pictures were in wintertime, you could see that the hooves were ripply and kind of flared at the bottom and the after pictures looks like in the spring and sunlight, but you can see a significant difference in the hooves. Let's go back and how did you find this horse? What was going on with it when you first found it? Let's just start there.<br /> <br /> Monica Kay:<br /> <br /> Okay. Well, we found this horse that was for sale. We really didn't have the intentions of buying a horse, didn't really need another horse, but when we seen the condition that the horse was in underweight, its hooves hadn't seen a farrier in a year. It became a rescue mission where we knew that we had to get the horse out of that situation and start taking care of her. We did end up buying the horse and we noticed she had a little bit of speed on her and thought, "Well, maybe she could be my daughter's next speed horse or contester."<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Right, and she's interested in barrels and poles and things of that nature.<br /> <br /> Monica Kay:<br /> <br /> Right. Correct, correct.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Yeah, so when you got her home, obviously, you had mentioned she was kind of a rescue mission at this point, but so we would assume you probably vet checked and started putting a feed and nutrition to her. What kind of changes were you seeing just by doing that?<br /> <br /> Monica Kay:<br /> <br /> I mean, she started just the feed. She started putting on some weight, but I mean her coat still kind of looked dull. We got the farrier out right away to trim her feet and they still just, I mean, even being trimmed, they would grow funny. They had these ripples to them, they just did not look healthy.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Mm-hmm (affirmative), and then someone mentioned a product called Equinety Horse XL. Tell us about that.<br /> <br /> Monica Kay:<br /> <br /> Mm-hmm (affirmative), so a lady at one of the barns that I know, she has an older horse that was having some lameness and she started him on Equinety and noticed a difference that he wasn't as stiff, and she mentioned it. Then we had been talking to Danielle Bowser and she mentioned that all their horses are on Equinety so we thought, "You know what, we're going to try it. People rave about it," so we just took the leap of faith and got some Equinety.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Awesome, and how long were you using the product before you started noticing changes?<br /> <br /> Monica Kay:<br /> <br /> Within a few weeks, I would say to notice the changes, especially in her personality and her muscle tone and her coat, health slowly came on too. I mean, I would say within a few months all of it came together and we noticed a huge difference. When we first got her, John Dowdy 1 13:42
Equinety Ultimate OEC Launches – Dr. Zach Bruggen DVM – Flaxseed Omega 3 – Vitamin E – Colloidal Silver https://www.teamequinety.com/equinety-ultimate-oec-launches-dr-zach-bruggen-dvm-flaxseed-omega-3-vitamin-e-colloidal-silver/ Tue, 10 Mar 2020 13:00:27 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1903   Equinety Ultimate OEC Launches - Dr. Zach Bruggen DVM - Flaxseed Omega 3 - Vitamin E - Colloidal Silver   John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinity podcast. We're going to swing out into the great state of Arkansas next to my old Oklahoma stomping grounds. We've got Dr. Zach Bruggen, veterinarian on the line. Doc, welcome to the Equinity podcast. Dr. Bruggen:                 Hey John, how are you? I'm excited to be here and talking about what we got coming down the line with the Equinity line of products. John Dowdy:                 And other things. Yes. You almost let the cat out of the bag, which is perfectly fine. For almost five years we've been on the market now with the Equinity Horse Excel, which is a 100% pure amino acids. There is no fillers, sugars, starches. There's no loading dose. It has a really taken on a life of its own. It's one of the reasons why we started the podcast. I guess you found out about the Equinity Horse Excel probably a couple of years ago, I'd say, thereabout. Dr. Bruggen:                 Yeah, that's right. John Dowdy:                 So. Go ahead. Dr. Bruggen:                 I was just introduced to the product on social media and then here in the community, hearing horse people talk about it and the results that they were experiencing with their horses. I'm always down to try some of the supplements out on the market with my own horses and get a feel for what's out there, which is what I ended up recommending to my clients for their horses. It was really imperative for anything that I recommend that I try it myself and my horses. I gave Equinity a try and have been super impressed with not only my horses response to it, but also all of my clients as well. John Dowdy:                 Sure. Now when you first saw the product and saw the combination of amino acids, what was your initial thought? Because, being in the veterinarian field, and we talk to a lot of veterinarians on this side. It all depends on the school they come from. Some of them are like, "Oh my gosh, I've never seen a combination like this." Others are like, "They're amino acids." I guess that's typical in any field. What was your reaction and thoughts when you first saw it? Dr. Bruggen:                 My thought was that it was formulated perfectly because it's pure amino acids. It was at a concentration that I knew was going to be efficacious for the horse. Amino acids are the building blocks for all the proteins of the body. We know that this is essential for horses to basically go throughout the day and do what we ask them to do. Whether that's trail riding, performance riding, or even just being a pasture pet. Looking closely into the ingredient list, we know that there's not any fillers. It is just plain amino acids which are bio-available to the horse that they can utilize to help regenerate and recover the cells that are undergoing compromise. I thought that the product had a very solid foundation. There's plenty of studies out there that support the supplementation of amino acids in human medicine. I knew that that would translate over to the horses just because of the pure foundation of what amino acids are and then what they provide for the body. John Dowdy:                 Sure. Without getting too in depth on this particular podcast, as we get into the nutritional aspect, and again, taking into consideration, depending on what part of the country you're in, sometimes you have to supplement more of one thing and other people don't. Speaking from our side and what this Equinity Horse Excel to us, every horse in every part of the country and in other countries, they all seem to be benefiting from this stack of amino acids that we have in a Equinity Horse Excel. It doesn't matter if it's a high performance born that gets the creme de la creme to the everyday chill writer or the everyday horse owner that's just trying to do good by their horse.

 

Equinety Ultimate OEC Launches – Dr. Zach Bruggen DVM –
Flaxseed Omega 3 – Vitamin E – Colloidal Silver

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinity podcast. We’re going to swing out into the great state of Arkansas next to my old Oklahoma stomping grounds. We’ve got Dr. Zach Bruggen, veterinarian on the line. Doc, welcome to the Equinity podcast.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Hey John, how are you? I’m excited to be here and talking about what we got coming down the line with the Equinity line of products.

John Dowdy:                 And other things. Yes. You almost let the cat out of the bag, which is perfectly fine. For almost five years we’ve been on the market now with the Equinity Horse Excel, which is a 100% pure amino acids. There is no fillers, sugars, starches. There’s no loading dose. It has a really taken on a life of its own. It’s one of the reasons why we started the podcast. I guess you found out about the Equinity Horse Excel probably a couple of years ago, I’d say, thereabout.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Yeah, that’s right.

John Dowdy:                 So. Go ahead.

Dr. Bruggen:                 I was just introduced to the product on social media and then here in the community, hearing horse people talk about it and the results that they were experiencing with their horses. I’m always down to try some of the supplements out on the market with my own horses and get a feel for what’s out there, which is what I ended up recommending to my clients for their horses. It was really imperative for anything that I recommend that I try it myself and my horses. I gave Equinity a try and have been super impressed with not only my horses response to it, but also all of my clients as well.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Now when you first saw the product and saw the combination of amino acids, what was your initial thought? Because, being in the veterinarian field, and we talk to a lot of veterinarians on this side. It all depends on the school they come from. Some of them are like, “Oh my gosh, I’ve never seen a combination like this.” Others are like, “They’re amino acids.” I guess that’s typical in any field. What was your reaction and thoughts when you first saw it?

Dr. Bruggen:                 My thought was that it was formulated perfectly because it’s pure amino acids. It was at a concentration that I knew was going to be efficacious for the horse. Amino acids are the building blocks for all the proteins of the body. We know that this is essential for horses to basically go throughout the day and do what we ask them to do. Whether that’s trail riding, performance riding, or even just being a pasture pet. Looking closely into the ingredient list, we know that there’s not any fillers. It is just plain amino acids which are bio-available to the horse that they can utilize to help regenerate and recover the cells that are undergoing compromise. I thought that the product had a very solid foundation. There’s plenty of studies out there that support the supplementation of amino acids in human medicine. I knew that that would translate over to the horses just because of the pure foundation of what amino acids are and then what they provide for the body.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Without getting too in depth on this particular podcast, as we get into the nutritional aspect, and again, taking into consideration, depending on what part of the country you’re in, sometimes you have to supplement more of one thing and other people don’t. Speaking from our side and what this Equinity Horse Excel to us, every horse in every part of the country and in other countries, they all seem to be benefiting from this stack of amino acids that we have in a Equinity Horse Excel. It doesn’t matter if it’s a high performance born that gets the creme de la creme to the everyday chill writer or the everyday horse owner that’s just trying to do good by their horse. They all seem to be benefiting. Do you have any insight on why that might be?

Dr. Bruggen:                 The way that I word it to my clientele when I’m introducing the supplement and how it can be an integral part and their horses nutritional protocol is that, for me, I get to see horses from each end of the spectrum. I mean, you have clients who are going to feed gold standard feed, best hay out there. They’re out on pasture. They get brought up in their stall. Then you have the other end of the spectrum where maybe they’re just turned out. Maybe they’re on a dry lot. Maybe they’re not fed a grain. What I found was and the best way that I could correlate it for the clients was that the Equinity basically filled the voids that your horse potentially was not taking in through their daily nutritional program.

Dr. Bruggen:                 That’s what really made me so invested in the product because I was seeing horses and all these different environments or management protocols that were all benefiting from it because it was filling the void that they potentially may be lacking in their nutritional program. The horse that’s treated on gold standard, they may not have a lot of those nutritional deficiencies, but those amino acids are going to help them continue to compete at a high level, recover their muscles better. They’re going to look great. They’re going to feel great versus, you may see more of a clinical change physically with a horse that may not be on that high level plain of nutrition. That’s what really has captivated a lot of my clientele with a product and for me to continue to use it on my horses and keep it in the vet truck.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. I think that’s very consistent with what we hear from customers around the country and in other countries as I mentioned. Again, it’s one of the reasons I started the podcast as a way to capture these stories because there are so many of them coming in. I always try to reiterate the fact that this is not a miracle supplement. It’s not the magic thing. You said it best. It’s filling that void. That seems to be, from mystery leanness things, to high performance horses, to pretty much every horse, is benefiting from it.

John Dowdy:                 Switching gears a little bit here. I guess it was about, well going back about a year and a half ago, you had called me up. We were actually, or I was actually at the NBA worlds in Perry, Georgia. We were chatting like we often do. You asked me a question and that question was, “Hey, have you guys ever thought about coming out with a second product?” If I remember correctly, my response was, “Well, not for the sake of coming out with one. It had better be good.” You said to me, “Well I think I have something that would really fill a void and would really work in tandem with the Equinity Horse Excel.

John Dowdy:                 We do a lot of education. We feel like we’ve done a lot of education with the amino acids. This really paid off big time. You put something on my table, which really peaked my interest. I will have to admit to you though, when you first told me that you were a big proponent of oil, my initial reaction was, “Oh gosh. A lot of people have oils. There’s a lot of oils on the market.” You said, “Hang on there Buckaroo.” Well, you didn’t actually say that. You said, “Listen to what I have to say,” and I’m like, “Hey, I’m all ears,” because you know what, our tagline is, Helping Horses Worldwide. Just from our relationship and what you had and what you explained to me, as I remember it, it was like the ultimate oil because you were looking around. You were always on the hunt for the ultimate oil and if there wasn’t one. If there was an ultimate oil, what would that look like?

John Dowdy:                 That leads into our introduction here of our oil called the Equinity Ultimate OEC. We’ll get into the acronym of what OEC stands for, which is… Well, I’ll let you do the honors here and explain exactly the components of this oil here.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Yeah. My brain’s always turning, just thinking about a bunch of different things. As I travel to these farms and see the needs of the horses that I work with. One of those things was, I’ve had experience feeding oil to my horses. I’ve enjoyed the response that I’ve gotten with them on that type of a supplement. As products come out and you pick and choose what works and what doesn’t. I was thinking in my head and I was really, at that time, a couple of years into using the Equinity Horse XL and really loving the product. I was like, maybe I’ll just ask Josh if there’d be any interest in something like this. It went from there.

Dr. Bruggen:                 The biggest thing is that when we actually sit down and we actually look, if you are supplementing oil, what is that oil actually comprised of? When you look on the back of the label, I think it’s one of the things that we need to do in a lot of aspects of our life. It’s just to educate ourselves on what is actually in the products that we’re feeding our horses or adding to their nutritional program. Looking at some of the ones that were offered at our local feed stores and out there on social media, I was looking and I was like, “You know, a lot of these are just filled with maybe the not the best things that we could potentially be offering our horses.”

Dr. Bruggen:                 I was set out to find, like you were saying, the ultimate oil that we could come out with. So what we did was compose an oil that is rich in Omega 3’s versus Omega 6’s. I think we’re going to kind of delve in a little bit more about those specifics here in a little bit. Then the addition of vitamin E as well as colloidal silver. There was a bunch of different things that when we first started talking about it that we had added into it. I think you can make a case for a lot of those, but at the end of the day, our goal was to streamline a product that was extremely high quality, that set a really good foundation for what we felt would really improve the nutritional aspect of your horse’s protocol. Then also try to find a product that would really compliment and pair well with the Equinity Horse Excel. I really feel like we’ve achieved that with this new oil.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, and I agree. I mean, we’ve spent a little over a year research development. We’ve tweaked the formula a couple of different times. All the horses that you did the testing on, how do they like it? As far as taste goes?

Dr. Bruggen:                 All of them took to it very, very well. Obviously anytime we add a new supplement or anything to our horses’ routine there’s always that little bit of caution as to whether they’re going to take to it or not. We trialed it on the horses in my barn and then a couple of horses outside of it as well. The results were consistent. Maybe there was one horse out of the group that maybe was a little hesitant, that extra picky eater that maybe took a day or so to really get used to it. Most of them just gobbled or grown up just like they did prior to. I even had one person say that they felt like their horse actually ate better when the oil was on their grain compared to when it was not.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Yeah. When we get into the Ultimate OEC, so what we’re talking about here is a flaxseed based oil or Omega 3. That’s where the O comes from. A vitamin E, that’s the E. The C is colloidal silver. OEC, you have your Omega 3, vitamin E, and colloidal silver. I tell you, as we go along here, I want to go through each line item and I want to talk about the maybe the benefits of having each one and why it was all combined in this. Ultimately what we’re doing is we’re feeding the cells that have been repaired from the Equinity amino acids, the Equinity Horse Excel. My background, I’ve done some body building things, a lot of health stuff and I know the importance of repairing and regenerating the cells. I also know the importance of trying to feed those cells. It’s always been in my mind as we’re here in the horse industry. The timing of you coming along… This is just awesome. It’s exciting. It’s perfect.

John Dowdy:                 Let’s get right into the building blocks of the product here. Let’s talk about the importance of oils. You kind of touched on this. Omega 3’s versus Omega 6’s. I know a lot of people out in the horse industry use oils. Part of our education here is the importance of Omega 3’s versus Omega 6’s. Let’s get into that and talk about the pros and the cons of each and help… Let’s just jump right in and educate some folks here.

Dr. Bruggen:                 All right. There’s two types of essential fatty acids that is needed in the horse’s diet. Those are going to be though Omega 3’s and they Omega 6’s. We can further break those down. We know, with the clinical trials and the studies that we’ve gone through, know what each of those Omega 6’s and Omega 3’s, how they contribute to the horse’s body and the effects that they have on it. Anytime the horses eat an essential fatty acid or it’s in their diet, it will be oxidized for energy and incorporate it into cell membrane. I think that reiterate again what this oil is going to provide when using in conjunction with the Equinity Horse Excel, as far as nutritionally supporting those repaired cells from the Equinity Horse Excel.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Breaking those down, like I said, a little bit further. We know that Omega 6’s are actually more pro inflammatory in nature where though Omega 3’s are actually more anti-inflammatory in nature. When you have the words inflammatory and anti-inflammatory, we all know that we want to have a product that’s going to be more anti-inflammatory. One of the biggest things that equine veterinarians work on is making sure that our horses feel good, that they’re sound, ready for competition. We don’t want anything that’s going to contribute to an inflammatory process within the horses body. When we’re looking at the specific oils that are out there, or if you’re at your local co-op or the feed store, things that we see are, soy, rice bran, sunflower, corn oil. When you actually look at those, those oils are extremely rich in Omega 6’s and have little to no Omega 3’s. Those oral oils are going to be much more pro-inflammatory in the horse’s body versus the Omega 3’s.

Dr. Bruggen:                 That was what we really wanted to hyper focus on, was getting an oil that was actually that appropriate ratio of Omega 3’s to Omega 6’s. That’s why we went with the flaxseed oil because that’s going to be the highest oil in Omega 3’s. When we talk about supplementation, earlier in the podcast we were talking about the range of how horses are managed and their nutrition protocols and what they’re offered.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Horses that have access to a good pasture and a balanced grain diet will normally not necessarily have a clinical deficiency in their fatty acid levels. Normally forge is going to be higher in Omega 3’s while grains are going to be a little bit higher in Omega 6’s. Those are going to be grains that are like sugar and starch based, those non-structural carbohydrates. Those horses may not necessarily exhibit a clinical deficiency in those, but we know, through clinical studies, that a horse is still going to benefit from supplementation of an oil that’s high in Omega 3’s due to those anti-inflammatory properties. Obviously a horse that doesn’t have, let’s just call it the gold standard, as far as having access to lush green grass and grain and this, that and the other, then it’s even more of a benefit for those horses because then they’re being provided these essential fatty acids in their diet that they may be lacking.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Things that we know that the Omega 3’s can help with are decreasing chronic lower airway inflammation, metabolic conditions in horses, they’re like Cushings and Equine Metabolic Syndrome. It helps that through increasing the insulin sensitivity. We also know that it increases fertility in both mares and in stallions. It helps with cardiovascular health. I think a lot of people will resonate with that because we hear it in the news and on other types of social media of how good the Omegas are for our heart, especially like fish oil, which is also incorporated into this oil. We know that it improves joint health. Then we obviously see a physical change with these horses because they tend to have a much healthier coat and skin. They have a great shine to them. A lot of them will baffle out. There’s a ton of benefits to an oil, but you really have to make sure that is that correct balance of Omega 3’s to Omega 6’s to get those benefits.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Let’s touch a little bit upon the difference in how oils are sometimes processed, heat and chemically processed versus cold-pressed. Ours, just like Equinity Horse Excel and amino acids, it’s got to be the best of the best. That’s what we went with when it comes to this flaxseed based oil being cold pressed. For those tuning in that are using an oil, what are the pros and cons of a heat chemically processed oil versus a cold pressed oil?

Dr. Bruggen:                 Really the main difference is that heat basically will break down or denature the proteins and the components of any type of an element that you’re trying to add. The more heat or stress that the Omegas have to go through, the less bio-available and the less function that they’re going to have once consumed by the horse. By going through the cold press process, we’re not denaturing those proteins, we’re keeping it whole, we’re keeping it to where it’s going to be 100% bio-available to these horses and not have it broken down prior to the horse ingesting it.

John Dowdy:                 That makes perfect sense. If you’re using an oil out there, a couple of things to think about, 3’s versus 6’s, cold press versus heat or chemically processed, and then of course, all the benefits that you ran through with Omega 3’s.

John Dowdy:                 Now let’s get into the next component, which is vitamin E. Let’s talk about the importance of vitamin E. Why is it in here, daily requirements for a horse and things like that.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Vitamin E is an awesome vitamin. I love it because it has a ton of benefits for the horse. Vitamin E is a fat soluble vitamin that is stored in the liver. The main thing that vitamin E provides their horses is it’s powerful antioxidant affects. These effects translate to healthier muscles, immune system and nerve function. Those of us that have horses, we know that there’s a lot of different conditions that can affect all of these groups of subjects. One of them being the neurologic component. I think most horse owners are going to be familiar with EPM. That’s one of the more common type of neurologic conditions that we come in contact with a lot, especially in the area that I practice. Vitamin E is utilized a lot in the treatment and recovery of these horses because it’s a vitamin that will actually cross the blood brain barrier and then effectively help with the antioxidant effects in the spinal cord where a lot of these inflammatory processes are occurring due to the protozoa that causes EPM.

Dr. Bruggen:                 It’s an awesome vitamin. The horses don’t produce this vitamin so it has to be consumed. Our goal was to say, “Hey, we know all the great benefits that vitamin E provides. Let’s make sure that with the dosing that we’re providing for the Equinity Ultimate OEC, that they’re going to be getting their daily dose of vitamin E every day with this product.” Going into a little bit more about the vitamin E, there’s two types. There is synthetic vitamin E, which is derived more from petroleum. Then you have natural vitamin E, which is going to be more from plant oils. There’s a really big important distinction between the two. The synthetic vitamin E has little to no bioavailability to the horse.

Dr. Bruggen:                 What that means is that if, let’s say, I’m supplementing my horse. I want to supplement them with vitamin E because maybe they’re recovering from an EPM episode. You’re all excited that you’ve chosen this vitamin and everything and you’re feeding it. If it’s synthetic vitamin E, you’re basically not giving any benefit to the horse. Bioavailability means how that horse is able to utilize what it’s given and translate that into basically the results that you expect. The synthetic vitamin E has little to no bioavailability, so you pretty much are squirting it out on the ground instead of actually doing anything beneficial for the horse. Where the natural vitamin E, which is what is utilized in the Equinity Ultimate OEC, has a very high bioavailability. We know that what we’re actually providing the horse in terms of dosing the vitamin E as far as daily requirement, we know that the vitamin E that they’re receiving is going to be utilized and processed through the body appropriately to where they are going to get those antioxidant effects.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. I know in one of the early formulations we had a higher vitamin E content. I think it was around 1800 or 2000 IU’s of vitamin E. The hard cost just for the raw materials made it way too expensive. As we started going back and forth and we were like, well a thousand IU’s is the daily recommended dose for vitamin E. Could you expand on that a little bit as far as, if every horse can get their daily vitamin E, 1,000 IU’s… Then you had also brought up EPM horses and neurological things. What would a horse in that scenario… How much vitamin E would they need to consume to help that issue?

Dr. Bruggen:                 Again, going back, our goal was to basically create an oil that was a great foundation. Now there’s going to obviously be outliers in that and every horse has to be considered as an independent. For example, if your horse is experiencing a neurologic condition such as EPM, most likely your veterinarian is going to recommend that they get a higher level of vitamin E on a daily basis. There are specific vitamin E supplements, just basically pure vitamin E, that then can be added in addition to this oil to get you to that level of what they would require. Let’s say like 10,000 IU’s for a neurologic worst that’s dealing with EPM. We know that, hey that horse is still getting that daily requirement of vitamin E through this oil. Because of this specific condition and what the horse is going through, we need to utilize a little bit more through a direct source of vitamin E in terms of… Vitamin E specific supplement to make up what that horse needs in terms of fighting that specific condition.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Based on everything that you just spoke about and if your horse falls into that category, just make sure that the vitamin E that you’re getting is a natural vitamin E and not a synthetic vitamin E.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Yeah, absolutely. Do your research. Talk to the people, the manufacturers. A lot of these supplement companies or companies out there that offer these types of products… They usually have a nutritionist and, or sometimes a veterinarian on staff that can go over the product and make sure that you’re getting the right one for your horse.

John Dowdy:                 Right. Again, with our product, the Ultimate OEC, we’ve got the daily recommended, which is the foundation of what your horse needs. Based on demand, we might bring out, down the road, just a vitamin E that’s a high quality, natural sourced vitamin E that could maybe cater to those other issues. As it sits right now, just as you mentioned, a nice foundation of what your horse needs in combination with the amino acids.

John Dowdy:                 Let’s get into the third component here, which is a very interesting one. As I’ve been mentioning this new product to… Mentioning it strategically to certain people in my phone conversations, when I mentioned this ingredient, this is what seems to really get them excited. That is colloidal silver. Why did we add this to this combination and what are the benefits?

Dr. Bruggen:                 All right, so colloidal silver is been used for quite awhile in human supplementation. It’s been recently gaining a little bit more popularity over on the equine side. I think if the most thing that people are going to kind of be familiarized with colloidal silver is through respiratory nebulizing. A lot of the nebulizers out there that are on the market for horses utilize colloidal silver in the nebulization. In looking at it a little bit more, there’s a lot of really cool benefits of the colloidal silver, one of them being that it has, because of the charge that it carries, it has a naturally occurring antimicrobial and antiviral property. The cool thing about it is because of that charge that it has on it, on the silver, it disrupts the bacteria from proliferating. With that being said, it also doesn’t contribute to antibiotic resistance. That’s one of the things that we’re really fighting these days as veterinarians and then human doctors, is that some of these bacteria are becoming basically resistant to the antibiotics that we’re utilizing. To have something that can be given on a daily basis that is going to help prevent, hopefully, these horses getting sick and when they do getting over it a little bit faster. Anytime that we don’t have to utilize the antibiotics or any of that, that’s always a benefit.

Dr. Bruggen:                 With that also being said, we also know that it helps with the gastrointestinal pH. Equine ulcers is a huge thing that we combat in the equine industry. Having something that they can get on a daily basis that’s going to help regulate that gastrointestinal pH and hopefully prevent the development of gastric ulcers is always nice. Then it also plays a role in thirst intake. A horse that’s competing at a high level… Any horse in general, we just want to make sure that they’re continually drinking that allotted daily requirement of about 10 to 12 gallons a day. Knowing that you’re providing something on the feed that’s going to help drive that thirst intake is comforting to know, so we don’t run into things like dehydration or impaction colics or tying up or all those other kinds of conditions that fall under a horse being dehydrated.

John Dowdy:                 Right. I am so excited. I don’t know if it’s coming through on this podcast or not. It really doesn’t matter because you know what, internally we’re super excited.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Yes, we’re very, very excited.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, and I tell you, over the last couple of months as this is becoming closer to fruition, I’ve been having more and more conversations and the response has been overwhelmingly so excited from people. They’re like, “Please tell me when this is coming out. Please tell me when this is available.” Several of our wholesalers that resell our product, “Please tell us. We will carry that product.” I’m like, holy cow. It’s a game changer in my humble opinion. When we look at this combination of high quality oil, high quality vitamin E, the colloidal silver and the combination of the amino acids… Again, the amino acids are giving the body what it needs to help heal from a cellular level. Then this oil combination with the vitamin and mineral are helping to feed those cells. Ultimately, what can people expect overall from feeding the combination of these products?

Dr. Bruggen:                 Yeah, I think when you look at it and break it down, with the Equinity Horse Excel, we know that amino acids are essential in the building blocks of all the proteins and what those proteins provide for the body. We know that it is super essential and helping getting that horse to the level that we desire. Whether that’s how they look physically, whether that’s how they perform. Then the oil itself, going through all the benefits of the 3’s and 6’s and the vitamin E and the colloidal silver, I think that knowing that your horse is getting this really high quality foundation nutritional program and something that’s super easy, we’re not having to load these horses or do a loading dose for a couple months and then drop them down to maintenance. It’s just super simple, streamlined. It makes it really easy. You have two products that really can give your horse absolutely everything that they need.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Like we’ve talked about, if there are those horses on the outliers that require additional supplementation, that can obviously be achieved by working with your veterinarian and everything. That was the goal, of trying to find two products that complemented one another so well and knowing what the amino acids do to the cells of the body and then being able to literally provide them the nutritional support to basically thrive after being repaired. I think that is really the goal that we set out in doing this and then knowing the other benefits that these components provide is just icing on the cake in my opinion.

John Dowdy:                 No, absolutely. As we’ve mentioned a couple of times with this being really the foundation and depending on the part of the country that you’re in, and we don’t even have to get into any depths of this whatsoever. A couple of conversations I’ve had with people, “Oh, well is there selenium in it,” or, “Is there this in it or that?” The short answer is no. It’s a very simple, high quality oil, vitamin E, colloidal silver combination to work specifically in conjunction with our amino acids. When you have this solid foundation, and of course we always recommend from a company standpoint, and I’m sure you’ll agree with this too, it’s vitally important to have a good team around you with your veterinarian and farrier.

John Dowdy:                 I tell people all the time, up until this point, just with the amino acids, one of the benefits that that product provides is a really strong, healthy, faster growing hoof. Amongst some of the other benefits. One of the examples that I give, is if you have the best farrier on the planet, standing in front of your horse that has a major hoof problem, there’s not much the farrier can do if there’s not much hoof to work with. One of the benefits of the amino acids of the Equinity Horse Excel, it helps grow that faster, stronger, healthier, growing hoof, which gives the farrier more to work with in a shorter amount of time. By adding the ultimate OEC in a combination with the Equinity Horse Excel, we’re really given your horse a great foundation of high quality products that really gives your team around you a lot more to work with. If you do need to supplement a few other things, then that’s going to be specific to your horse and where they’re at in that particular stage of life and part of the country.

John Dowdy:                 That is pretty darn awesome. Well, is there anything else that you can think of that we haven’t touched upon or should we just end this right here and get this stuff out there?

Dr. Bruggen:                 I’m ready to get it out there. I’ve been sending you texts and emails throughout the year, just so excited about this product. We’ve worked really, really hard in making sure that what we’ve developed as something that we’re proud of, that we know is going to have success. I mean, me as a veterinarian, I want all my clients and their horses obviously to be happy. I want the horses to be healthy and happy. Even for my horses, I want to be able to have products in the barn that I know that my horses are going to look amazing 100% of the time. They’re going to perform well. I really believe that we’ve developed a product that compliments an already outstanding product in itself. I think just to… I always tell people, I was like, “Keep it simple.”

Dr. Bruggen:                 Sometimes I go into these barns and there’s cabinets full of supplements. Sometimes the worst is honestly eating more supplements than it is probably a grain. If you can streamline what you’re doing nutritionally for your horse and get all those extras, maybe not essential things, out of there, and really just give them that solid foundation to where their body can utilize what they’re being given. I think it will be a game changer for so many of these horses to really just feel their best, look their best and perform their best. I’m just really excited.

John Dowdy:                 No, that’s great. I think what I actually heard you say, and you put in a lot of other things, but in the beginning of that whole thing. Really this oil was for yourself in your own barn. If everybody else can benefit then that’s great too. I think that’s what I heard.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Yeah, absolutely.

John Dowdy:                 Awesome. Oh gosh. I tell you what, I’m excited. Of course I know you are. We have a lot of people that are excited about this. I can’t thank you enough for taking the time to go into the depths of exactly what this is. Hopefully if you’re using an oil, just makes sure that it’s Omega 3 oil. If you’re using vitamin E, make sure that it’s natural. There are some other components in here, hopefully some great takeaways that if you already use some things or are looking at using some things, just keep these points in mind when you’re looking for a good quality oil and vitamin E.

John Dowdy:                 Dr. Zach Bruggen, thank you so much for taking the time to share all the information here about the newest Equinity product, the Ultimate OEC.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Thank you, John. I appreciate it very much.

John Dowdy:                 You bet. Thanks. Bye. Bye.

Dr. Bruggen:                 Bye.

 

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This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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  Equinety Ultimate OEC Launches - Dr. Zach Bruggen DVM - Flaxseed Omega 3 - Vitamin E - Colloidal Silver   - John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinity podcast. We're going to swing out into the great state of Arkansas n...  <br /> Equinety Ultimate OEC Launches - Dr. Zach Bruggen DVM -<br /> Flaxseed Omega 3 - Vitamin E - Colloidal Silver<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinity podcast. We're going to swing out into the great state of Arkansas next to my old Oklahoma stomping grounds. We've got Dr. Zach Bruggen, veterinarian on the line. Doc, welcome to the Equinity podcast.<br /> <br /> Dr. Bruggen:                 Hey John, how are you? I'm excited to be here and talking about what we got coming down the line with the Equinity line of products.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 And other things. Yes. You almost let the cat out of the bag, which is perfectly fine. For almost five years we've been on the market now with the Equinity Horse Excel, which is a 100% pure amino acids. There is no fillers, sugars, starches. There's no loading dose. It has a really taken on a life of its own. It's one of the reasons why we started the podcast. I guess you found out about the Equinity Horse Excel probably a couple of years ago, I'd say, thereabout.<br /> <br /> Dr. Bruggen:                 Yeah, that's right.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 So. Go ahead.<br /> <br /> Dr. Bruggen:                 I was just introduced to the product on social media and then here in the community, hearing horse people talk about it and the results that they were experiencing with their horses. I'm always down to try some of the supplements out on the market with my own horses and get a feel for what's out there, which is what I ended up recommending to my clients for their horses. It was really imperative for anything that I recommend that I try it myself and my horses. I gave Equinity a try and have been super impressed with not only my horses response to it, but also all of my clients as well.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Sure. Now when you first saw the product and saw the combination of amino acids, what was your initial thought? Because, being in the veterinarian field, and we talk to a lot of veterinarians on this side. It all depends on the school they come from. Some of them are like, "Oh my gosh, I've never seen a combination like this." Others are like, "They're amino acids." I guess that's typical in any field. What was your reaction and thoughts when you first saw it?<br /> <br /> Dr. Bruggen:                 My thought was that it was formulated perfectly because it's pure amino acids. It was at a concentration that I knew was going to be efficacious for the horse. Amino acids are the building blocks for all the proteins of the body. We know that this is essential for horses to basically go throughout the day and do what we ask them to do. Whether that's trail riding, performance riding, or even just being a pasture pet. Looking closely into the ingredient list, we know that there's not any fillers. It is just plain amino acids which are bio-available to the horse that they can utilize to help regenerate and recover the cells that are undergoing compromise. I thought that the product had a very solid foundation. There's plenty of studies out there that support the supplementation of amino acids in human medicine. I knew that that would translate over to the horses just because of the pure foundation of what amino acids are and then what they provide for the body.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Sure. Without getting too in depth on this particular podcast, as we get into the nutritional aspect, and again, taking into consideration, depending on what part of the country you're in, sometimes you have to supplement more of one thing and other people don't. Speaking from our side and what this Equinity Horse Excel to us, every horse in every part of the country and in other countries, they all seem to be benefiting from this stack of amino acids that we have in a Equinity Horse Excel. It doesn't matter if it's a high performance born that gets the creme ... John Dowdy 1 38:24
053 – Beverly Ann Detlefsen – Easy Keeper – Heaves – Depressed – Faster Recovery – More Focused https://www.teamequinety.com/053-beverly-ann-detlefsen-easy-keeper-heaves-depressed-faster-recovery-more-focused/ Thu, 05 Mar 2020 01:27:16 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1894   Beverly Ann Detlefsen - Easy Keeper – Heaves – Depressed - Faster Recovery – More Focused   John Dowdy: Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to keep it right here in the sunny state of Florida we've got Beverly [Detleson 00:00:08] on the Equinety podcast this week. Beverly, welcome to the call. Beverly Ann Detlefsen: Hi, how are you? John Dowdy: I'm doing very well. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your Equinety story. I believe I came across your story because you posted a review on our Facebook page. I'm like wow, that's pretty intense. I reached out to you and here we are. Tell us about your horse and kind of what was going on there and let's just start there. Beverly Ann Detlefsen: All right, well Jasper is a, he'll be coming 15 years old this next year. We've owned him his whole entire life. He was born here at our farm in [Alottey 00:00:52]. His mama was actually my horse so it was kind of cool. Kind of felt like he had to be my horse because his mom was my horse. I sent him out to Oklahoma two years ago because I was going to nursing school and we had a close friend out there that didn't mind taking him at the time. He recently came home after he only had a little trouble out there. I knew, I wasn't sure what all he was going to need whenever he came home but I wanted him to be on Equinety because I had him on it prior two years ago whenever he left. Beverly Ann Detlefsen: He did so great on it then, it was helping him run better, run stronger, recover faster and the lady that went out there to pick him up, her name is [Diane Fryer 00:01:38]. She knew Jasper prior to whenever he went out there. She called me, she was like hey I just want you to know that this is, this isn't the horse you sent out there. You just need to prepare yourself. I really wasn't sure what she meant by that. I was just trying to prepare myself and when I opened the trailer door he was thin, his hair was, his tail was falling out and he wasn't really there mentally. He was just kind of a horse that was there. I started him on Equinety immediately because God knows he needed all the help he could get. John Dowdy: Now before you go any further you had already had him on Equinety prior to sending him out to Oklahoma and what kind of personality did he have? Beverly Ann Detlefsen: He's always been very nosy, a little bossy, always kind of in your pocket, very personable and always has something to say about everything. He's a true one on one horse for sure. John Dowdy: Yeah so you sent him out there because it was at the time going to be the best place for him because you're going to nursing school. He was out there what, for a couple of years? Beverly Ann Detlefsen: Yes, for two almost years almost to the date actually. John Dowdy: You were kind of forewarned coming back that it was not the horse that you sent out there so what did you find when he came off the trailer? Beverly Ann Detlefsen: When I opened the trailer door I never, he's a very easy keeper. I'm going to throw that out there before I say this. I mean he's a very easy keeper, always has been his whole life. He was so [inaudible 00:03:17] I mean he was just, he looked okay from the side his ribs were showing but looking at him front and back he was so narrow. You could see his tailbone sticking up, you could just feel his chest bone in between his front legs which I have never actually experienced with a horse. I was absolutely blown away that he was in that condition. John Dowdy: Wow, that had to be really, really tough especially sending him out here thinking that he's going to be taken well care of. Beverly Ann Detlefsen: Yes. John Dowdy: Wow, now was he, were you using him for anything prior to that, he was a performance horse or what was his job? Beverly Ann Detlefsen: He's been a barrel horse his whole life. He had a little bit of a late start.

 

Beverly Ann Detlefsen – Easy Keeper – Heaves –
Depressed – Faster Recovery – More Focused

 

John Dowdy:

Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We’re going to keep it right here in the sunny state of Florida we’ve got Beverly [Detleson 00:00:08] on the Equinety podcast this week. Beverly, welcome to the call.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

Hi, how are you?

John Dowdy:

I’m doing very well. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your Equinety story. I believe I came across your story because you posted a review on our Facebook page. I’m like wow, that’s pretty intense. I reached out to you and here we are. Tell us about your horse and kind of what was going on there and let’s just start there.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

All right, well Jasper is a, he’ll be coming 15 years old this next year. We’ve owned him his whole entire life. He was born here at our farm in [Alottey 00:00:52]. His mama was actually my horse so it was kind of cool. Kind of felt like he had to be my horse because his mom was my horse. I sent him out to Oklahoma two years ago because I was going to nursing school and we had a close friend out there that didn’t mind taking him at the time. He recently came home after he only had a little trouble out there. I knew, I wasn’t sure what all he was going to need whenever he came home but I wanted him to be on Equinety because I had him on it prior two years ago whenever he left.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

He did so great on it then, it was helping him run better, run stronger, recover faster and the lady that went out there to pick him up, her name is [Diane Fryer 00:01:38]. She knew Jasper prior to whenever he went out there. She called me, she was like hey I just want you to know that this is, this isn’t the horse you sent out there. You just need to prepare yourself. I really wasn’t sure what she meant by that. I was just trying to prepare myself and when I opened the trailer door he was thin, his hair was, his tail was falling out and he wasn’t really there mentally. He was just kind of a horse that was there. I started him on Equinety immediately because God knows he needed all the help he could get.

John Dowdy:

Now before you go any further you had already had him on Equinety prior to sending him out to Oklahoma and what kind of personality did he have?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

He’s always been very nosy, a little bossy, always kind of in your pocket, very personable and always has something to say about everything. He’s a true one on one horse for sure.

John Dowdy:

Yeah so you sent him out there because it was at the time going to be the best place for him because you’re going to nursing school. He was out there what, for a couple of years?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

Yes, for two almost years almost to the date actually.

John Dowdy:

You were kind of forewarned coming back that it was not the horse that you sent out there so what did you find when he came off the trailer?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

When I opened the trailer door I never, he’s a very easy keeper. I’m going to throw that out there before I say this. I mean he’s a very easy keeper, always has been his whole life. He was so [inaudible 00:03:17] I mean he was just, he looked okay from the side his ribs were showing but looking at him front and back he was so narrow. You could see his tailbone sticking up, you could just feel his chest bone in between his front legs which I have never actually experienced with a horse. I was absolutely blown away that he was in that condition.

John Dowdy:

Wow, that had to be really, really tough especially sending him out here thinking that he’s going to be taken well care of.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

Yes.

John Dowdy:

Wow, now was he, were you using him for anything prior to that, he was a performance horse or what was his job?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

He’s been a barrel horse his whole life. He had a little bit of a late start. He’s been broke since he was two but he was just kind of a solid little [pokey 00:04:14], 3D, 4D horse until he turned about seven. I don’t know what crawled up and bit him but he one day he went from being a 3D horse to running 13th out of almost 300 horses I think at [inaudible 00:04:29] from here in 2013. I was like okay, all right. I guess it’s time to be a horse now.

John Dowdy:

Awesome, okay so let’s recap here. You’ve had this horse since he was born. You had him on Equinety running barrels and things and then you’re going off to nursing school so you send him off to Oklahoma for the time that you’re doing your schooling and thinking that he’s going to be well taken care of and you get him back is not the horse that you sent out there. That had to be pretty shocking in and of itself. What do you do at this point?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

When I got him home like I said I had the Equinety ordered, I had him ready to start it whenever he got home. I went and got some Renew Gold to start him on with it which is a good fat supplement. I was just feeding him just a scoop of feed twice a day because when he first got here he actually wouldn’t clean up his feed and I think it’s not because he had ulcers or he wasn’t hungry, it’s that he would get full so quick because his stomach had shrunk.

John Dowdy:

Right.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

You know I mean you could only feed him only so much. You could feed him all you want to but you can only feed him as much as they’re going to eat.

John Dowdy:

Right.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

We started out slow, I had no intentions of riding him straight off the bat, no intentions at all, just needed to get him healthy physically and mentally before we could do anything with him under saddle. We started him, he was eating, we’d feed a good feed, we’d feed it’s called Quality Blend it’s an 11/10 feed. It’s a good feed, fed him a scoop of that with the Equinety and [inaudible 00:06:18] and that’s all he was getting. You’ve seen the pictures, he put weight on very quick, weight, muscle and his coat and his hair grew back, it’s great.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, now I want to bring up this point too because you know anytime you get a horse and we hear a lot of these stories, you know rescued horses and kill pen rescues and things like this, of course any time that you’re able to give them the proper nutrition then they’re going to fill out and they’re going to become healthier. Based on what you know because you had used the Equinety prior to him going out there and how long did it take you the first time to start noticing changes in your horse because he was in great condition, performance horse, the first time you were using Equinety how long did it take you to really start noticing changes?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

It took him 60 days and the reason I put him on it the first time is he has Heaves, he had terrible, terrible Heaves. If you know horses with allergies do not do well in Florida which is another reason why I sent him to Oklahoma for that break.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, what did you notice, did it help with the Heaves?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

It helped, prior to a run before, so he makes a run, it would probably take him a solid 45 minutes to an hour to fully recover after a run. I’m talking this is a horse that’s in shape, gets rode every day, goes miles every day. He’s in shape, it’s not because of that it’s just because he can’t breathe, he cannot recover. After I put him on Equinety I noticed that he would recover almost 30 minutes faster after a run. He would be, by the time I’d get him to the trailer, get him unsaddled he’d be good, cooled off, he wouldn’t be you know gasping for air, needing that air in. Actually this time I had him, I was running him on Ventipulmin and Lasix because he was bleeding really bad but he’s not, he didn’t have any problems whenever I ran him this past weekend. He hasn’t been on anything, he’s not on anything but that. I actually had him on a creatine supplement too because I was reading that you know, Equinety helps [inaudible 00:08:33] that creatine better.

John Dowdy:

Right.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

I put him on that too.

John Dowdy:

Prior to Oklahoma just so we get our timeline here, really great performance horse, Heaves was a huge issue, was also an easy keeper. You noticed faster recovery, really helped with those Heaves. You sent him out to Oklahoma for a couple years, you bring him back and now here we have a horse that was not taken care of so you immediately stated him back on a good nutrition program and added the Equinety twice a day. How long did it take you to notice changes now using Equinety?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

Two weeks and I’ve actually only have been feeding it to him once a day because I wasn’t in a hurry and I didn’t want to just blow through the container so I’ve just been giving it to him once a day.

John Dowdy:

What have you noticed in those two weeks?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

His personality came back for one, he was back mentally out in the pasture before, whenever he got home he wouldn’t get out of this depressed, mopey walk, just had no interest. He was just hungry and depressed and didn’t want to do anything. Within two weeks he was starting to play with his pasture buddy, starting to act like a Gelding again, one of those dumb Geldings that they never grow up. He was back. He was himself and he was happy. He was eating really good. Every time he’d see you with a bucket of feed he’d just talk and wake up the entire barn and it was nice to have him back.

John Dowdy:

That’s great. Now since you’ve had him back, how long has he been back now?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

Today is 69 days since he’s been home.

John Dowdy:

Then I also understand that he was doing so well you put him back in the arena, tell us about that.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

I did. I went to a show last weekend here at our arena close to him, it’s about five minutes up the road. I had no intention of entering. I was just going to go and exhibition. He exhibitioned really well just like he’d always do. I didn’t really ask him for much, I just let him go his own speed and cruise through and he worked amazing. Come about 30 minutes prior to the show about to start they were like we need three more entries to make it a 4D and I was like, my mom went with me and I was like am I crazy to enter him, she was like do it. He worked really good. I was like all right let’s do it. I wasn’t even going to enter.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

I went up there and told the guy I was like if you can give me an early number I will enter. He’s like here, a lady just turned in number four. I was like good, sounds good. I got to hurry up and get back to the trailer because the show’s starting in 15 minutes and I was already packed up about to go home. I go, I throw his wrap and his saddle on him and I head up to the arena and a few people were like I thought you weren’t going to enter. I was like yeah, I wasn’t. I had to borrow a whip, I didn’t even have my stuff in the trailer. I had to borrow some reins and a whip.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

They went out there and he was very calm going into the arena. He felt very focused. He laid down an awesome run. I mean just snappy and automatic and just it was a perfect run honestly. He put a tenth and a half on the field. He won the show the entire time. Yeah, he won the show. He won his very first show back in two years with us together.

John Dowdy:

That’s incredible, wow. Okay so just as another recap here, I’ve just got to do this so you have a high performance horse, owned this horse since he was born, you go to nursing school so you sent your horse off to be taken care of for a couple years. He comes back completely not even the some horse, not even close, was not taken care of. You put him back on the Equinety along with the good nutrition and the things that needs to happen. You take a horse that’s a very outgoing bubbly personality that’s now depressed, not happy from all the stuff that he’s been through and in 69 days you’ve already you put him back in a race and he’s back. That’s incredible.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

I mean he’s back. He’s not just kind of back, he’s back 110%.

John Dowdy:

Wow, that is incredible. Well I tell you for those that are tuning in for the first time, maybe you’ve heard about this Equinety stuff across your news feed or maybe you know somebody that’s using it or you’re thinking about using it, in a CliffsNotes version because we have all this information on our website at teamequinety.com but the Equinety product is 100% pure amino acids which are the building blocks of protein. They’re specifically formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland which is the master gland on the body and that’s what releases the hormones which help heal at a cellular level. Used in combination with a good nutrition program, great farrier and vet and you have all that bases cover …

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

Absolutely.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, when you add the Equinety to it it just fills in all the little gaps. We’ve just seen this over and over and over. To have a horse come off that trailer that’s skin and bones and in 69 days to have him back 110% that’s incredible. Wow, yeah.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

Yeah.

John Dowdy:

If there’s somebody tuning in here for the first time and they’re still thinking okay well this all sounds good but sounds a little too good to be true or could be some snake oil or in this case powder, because it is not an oil it’s a powder, is there anything that you would like to say to them, might bring them over? Hey the water is warm, give the product a try. What would you have to tell them?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

I mean just do it. It’s affordable and on top of that I’ve never, I’ve fed it to more horses than just him, older horses that needed a little extra help later on in their lives and picky eaters that I’ve never had a problem with a horse eating it.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, it’s very palatable.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

Yeah, very, very good they eat it. Honestly it’s a miracle drug is what I want to call it.

John Dowdy:

Well it is a supplement, not a drug. You know what, I joke about that but it does, here’s the thing when you use drugs because when you have to use them you have to use them, those things work super fast because that’s what they do. It’s not probably a good plan to keep your horse on drugs for long periods of time because there’s negative side effects and things like that that happen. With this product what’s really interesting about it among many things but it actually stimulates the pituitary within 24 hours so it starts working right away. When you can give the body what it needs to help heal itself then there’s no guess work going on.

John Dowdy:

If you have a horse with a joint issues and what you typically do you look at joint supplements or possible injections or if it’s hoof problems you look at hoof supplements and creative shoeing and things like that, gut supplements or muscle building supplements, calming supplements and the really neat thing about this product is because we’re giving the body what it needs to release its own hormones then it’s that horse’s body that’s sending those hormones to the problem areas with pinpoint accuracy. You can have 12 horses with 12 different issues going on and it’s going to customize to each one while at the same time there will be commonalities, softer, shinier coat, they fill out. They have stronger, faster growing hooves. They’re happier. Just as you mentioned, there’s so many other benefits, easy keepers a lot of people worry about that. It works great with easy keepers, hard keepers, in this case severe Heaves. It turned him from a depressed horse back into a happy horse and he’s back running better than ever. That’s pretty awesome.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

Yeah, I mean by the time you know most barrel, I’m a barrel person so I’m going to speak to the barrel people they’re going to have their horses covered on ulcers, joint and some kind of muscle product. By the time you buy a muscle product, you spend the money on that, by the time you buy an ulcer product, you spend the money on that and a joint product, you are well deep into your pocketbook. Whereas you could put him on Equinety and that covers all the bases. It really does. I haven’t had him on anything and he’s been performing better than ever just on this.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, I’ll throw this out there, we hear this all the time, the people that are using the Equinety product are typically saving 20 to 40% in medical bills and other supplements, would you find that to be somewhat accurate?

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

Absolutely, 100% accurate.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, it’s pretty awesome. Well Beverly, I really appreciate you taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast. I know there will be people that really benefit from hearing this. If you’re in a situation where you’re just kind of at your wit’s end, you’ve tried a lot of other things, would highly encourage you to give the Equinety product a try. You can find it at teamequinety.com. Beverly Detleson from Alottey, Florida thank you so much for taking the time here on the Equinety podcast.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

All right, thank you so much for your time.

John Dowdy:

Okay, thank you bye bye.

Beverly Ann Detlefsen:

Bye.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  Beverly Ann Detlefsen - Easy Keeper – Heaves – Depressed - Faster Recovery – More Focused   - John Dowdy: - Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to keep it right here in the sunny state of Florida we've got Beverly [Det...  <br /> Beverly Ann Detlefsen - Easy Keeper – Heaves –<br /> Depressed - Faster Recovery – More Focused<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to keep it right here in the sunny state of Florida we've got Beverly [Detleson 00:00:08] on the Equinety podcast this week. Beverly, welcome to the call.<br /> <br /> Beverly Ann Detlefsen:<br /> <br /> Hi, how are you?<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> I'm doing very well. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your Equinety story. I believe I came across your story because you posted a review on our Facebook page. I'm like wow, that's pretty intense. I reached out to you and here we are. Tell us about your horse and kind of what was going on there and let's just start there.<br /> <br /> Beverly Ann Detlefsen:<br /> <br /> All right, well Jasper is a, he'll be coming 15 years old this next year. We've owned him his whole entire life. He was born here at our farm in [Alottey 00:00:52]. His mama was actually my horse so it was kind of cool. Kind of felt like he had to be my horse because his mom was my horse. I sent him out to Oklahoma two years ago because I was going to nursing school and we had a close friend out there that didn't mind taking him at the time. He recently came home after he only had a little trouble out there. I knew, I wasn't sure what all he was going to need whenever he came home but I wanted him to be on Equinety because I had him on it prior two years ago whenever he left.<br /> <br /> Beverly Ann Detlefsen:<br /> <br /> He did so great on it then, it was helping him run better, run stronger, recover faster and the lady that went out there to pick him up, her name is [Diane Fryer 00:01:38]. She knew Jasper prior to whenever he went out there. She called me, she was like hey I just want you to know that this is, this isn't the horse you sent out there. You just need to prepare yourself. I really wasn't sure what she meant by that. I was just trying to prepare myself and when I opened the trailer door he was thin, his hair was, his tail was falling out and he wasn't really there mentally. He was just kind of a horse that was there. I started him on Equinety immediately because God knows he needed all the help he could get.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Now before you go any further you had already had him on Equinety prior to sending him out to Oklahoma and what kind of personality did he have?<br /> <br /> Beverly Ann Detlefsen:<br /> <br /> He's always been very nosy, a little bossy, always kind of in your pocket, very personable and always has something to say about everything. He's a true one on one horse for sure.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Yeah so you sent him out there because it was at the time going to be the best place for him because you're going to nursing school. He was out there what, for a couple of years?<br /> <br /> Beverly Ann Detlefsen:<br /> <br /> Yes, for two almost years almost to the date actually.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> You were kind of forewarned coming back that it was not the horse that you sent out there so what did you find when he came off the trailer?<br /> <br /> Beverly Ann Detlefsen:<br /> <br /> When I opened the trailer door I never, he's a very easy keeper. I'm going to throw that out there before I say this. I mean he's a very easy keeper, always has been his whole life. He was so [inaudible 00:03:17] I mean he was just, he looked okay from the side his ribs were showing but looking at him front and back he was so narrow. You could see his tailbone sticking up, you could just feel his chest bone in between his front legs which I have never actually experienced with a horse. I was absolutely blown away that he was in that condition.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Wow, that had to be really, really tough especially sending him out here thinking that he'... John Dowdy 1 17:51
052 – Holly Ann Such – Cushings – Healthier Coat – More Spry – Thin Soles – Feeling Better – Stopped Swaying in Stall https://www.teamequinety.com/052-holly-ann-such-cushings-healthier-coat-more-spry-thin-soles-feeling-better-stopped-swaying-in-stall/ Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:00:05 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1890   Holly Ann Such – Cushings – Healthier Coat – More Spry - Thin Soles – Feeling Better – Stopped Swaying in Stall   John Dowdy: Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're going to swing over into St Augustine, Florida. And we've got Holly Ann Such on the Equinety Podcast this week. Holly, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Holly Ann Such : Thank you so much. I'm very excited to be here. John Dowdy: Well, we're excited to have you as well for another great story. I actually came across one of your comments on our Facebook advertising, and what caught my eye was you said, "This stuff works!" with three exclamation points. And then the next line is what got me. You said you were contemplating, "putting my mare down, because she was always in so much pain with her thin sole." So this was a last ditch effort. So tell us about your mare, what her... She's retired now, but what she was doing in her previous life, how long you've had her, and what you were dealing with? Holly Ann Such : So originally my mare came over from the Netherlands as a jumper, and after she retired from that, we decided to put her into dressage. So my trainer and I worked her up the levels, and we just always knew that her feet weren't fantastic. So we thought being in dressage was probably the best way for her to go. And even in the dressage work, the pressure was too much. She would always end up blowing an abscess, and then we would heal her from that one, get her back in shape, and then another one. It was just a rotating door. We were never really able to keep her sound much longer than a few weeks at a time. So at that point I decided the best thing for her was for me to go ahead and retire her about four years ago, when she was 16. John Dowdy: Right. And so with as you're describing one hoof issue, then the next one I picture when I would take my son to a Chuck E. Cheese, and that one little game where you had the big mallet, and you're trying to whack each one of the little things, the clowns that are popping up. It's like you get this one fixed, and then you got one over here, and then one over here. So it was just a battle all the time. And you were having to use a Bute as I understand, to try to deal with the pain. But she also had a great farrier. So you were able to manage with what you had pretty much all the time? Holly Ann Such : Yeah. Yes, pretty much. We tried to only give her Bute really every time we would put a new set of shoes on her, or we would try something different with her, she would get really, really sore. And we tried everything from pads, glue on shoes, every type of different shoe you could think of. My farrier and my vet even contacted other, at some farriers around the United States to get ideas about what to do with her. And just nothing seemed to work. And she would just be in so much pain after each trimming that we would have to give her Bute just to make her comfortable. Holly Ann Such : And then within the last probably six, seven months, she was just in so much constant pain all the time that we started her on a daily dose of Bute, which at that point is when I decided she probably didn't have the best quality of life. And that's when I was contemplating on having to euthanize her. So that's where we were as far as trying to keep her as comfortable as possible, because other than her feet, she's a pretty healthy girl, and everybody loves her. So we just wanted to do what we could for her, but. John Dowdy: Yes. Now in addition to the battling that you were having with her hooves, she's also a Cushing's horse. So you were dealing with things along that using Prascend, and dealing with lots of clippings from long coats. Holly Ann Such : Yes. So normally within the winter months we probably have to clip her every three to four weeks, just because her coat gets so thick so quickly. And we did recently clip her about two months ago.

 

Holly Ann Such – Cushings – Healthier Coat – More Spry –
Thin Soles – Feeling Better – Stopped Swaying in Stall

 

John Dowdy:

Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety Podcast. We’re going to swing over into St Augustine, Florida. And we’ve got Holly Ann Such on the Equinety Podcast this week. Holly, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Holly Ann Such :

Thank you so much. I’m very excited to be here.

John Dowdy:

Well, we’re excited to have you as well for another great story. I actually came across one of your comments on our Facebook advertising, and what caught my eye was you said, “This stuff works!” with three exclamation points. And then the next line is what got me. You said you were contemplating, “putting my mare down, because she was always in so much pain with her thin sole.” So this was a last ditch effort. So tell us about your mare, what her… She’s retired now, but what she was doing in her previous life, how long you’ve had her, and what you were dealing with?

Holly Ann Such :

So originally my mare came over from the Netherlands as a jumper, and after she retired from that, we decided to put her into dressage. So my trainer and I worked her up the levels, and we just always knew that her feet weren’t fantastic. So we thought being in dressage was probably the best way for her to go. And even in the dressage work, the pressure was too much. She would always end up blowing an abscess, and then we would heal her from that one, get her back in shape, and then another one. It was just a rotating door. We were never really able to keep her sound much longer than a few weeks at a time. So at that point I decided the best thing for her was for me to go ahead and retire her about four years ago, when she was 16.

John Dowdy:

Right. And so with as you’re describing one hoof issue, then the next one I picture when I would take my son to a Chuck E. Cheese, and that one little game where you had the big mallet, and you’re trying to whack each one of the little things, the clowns that are popping up. It’s like you get this one fixed, and then you got one over here, and then one over here. So it was just a battle all the time. And you were having to use a Bute as I understand, to try to deal with the pain. But she also had a great farrier. So you were able to manage with what you had pretty much all the time?

Holly Ann Such :

Yeah. Yes, pretty much. We tried to only give her Bute really every time we would put a new set of shoes on her, or we would try something different with her, she would get really, really sore. And we tried everything from pads, glue on shoes, every type of different shoe you could think of. My farrier and my vet even contacted other, at some farriers around the United States to get ideas about what to do with her. And just nothing seemed to work. And she would just be in so much pain after each trimming that we would have to give her Bute just to make her comfortable.

Holly Ann Such :

And then within the last probably six, seven months, she was just in so much constant pain all the time that we started her on a daily dose of Bute, which at that point is when I decided she probably didn’t have the best quality of life. And that’s when I was contemplating on having to euthanize her. So that’s where we were as far as trying to keep her as comfortable as possible, because other than her feet, she’s a pretty healthy girl, and everybody loves her. So we just wanted to do what we could for her, but.

John Dowdy:

Yes. Now in addition to the battling that you were having with her hooves, she’s also a Cushing’s horse. So you were dealing with things along that using Prascend, and dealing with lots of clippings from long coats.

Holly Ann Such :

Yes. So normally within the winter months we probably have to clip her every three to four weeks, just because her coat gets so thick so quickly. And we did recently clip her about two months ago. And seven weeks ago was when we started her on your product and realized that her coat wasn’t growing as fast. And we’re seven weeks out, and she doesn’t need to be body clipped again. And so the only thing we could think of is that that contributed to starting her on this product, and it’s helping with something with her Cushing’s disease, so.

John Dowdy:

So tell us how you came across the Equinety product, because up to the point before you started using it, like a lot of people, you’ve done everything that you know to do. You’ve got your medical team and farrier, and doing everything you can to manage the situation. But you’re also getting at your wit’s end as well, because with what you’re doing with it, it is inevitable. And this, you were already prepared. So tell us how you came across the Equinety Horse XL, and what happened next?

Holly Ann Such :

Actually, I was flipping through Facebook, and I saw your product pop up a few times, and I honestly just always flipped right past it, just because I don’t jump on the bandwagon with new products all the time. But every once in a while I would click on it, and I would read the reviews, and it was always a five star review, and everyone just telling their story. And I had said to my husband, I was like, “I have tried everything for this mare.” I was like, “This is going to be my last product. This is my last ditch effort. I’m going to try it and see how it goes.” I just felt like I didn’t have anything to lose.

Holly Ann Such :

So I ordered it, and I’ll be completely honest, I really didn’t think it was going to do anything, because it’s not too often that you find a good product on Facebook, so. Normally you get scammed. And so I didn’t really have high expectations, but I just felt like I needed to do one more thing, and this was it. So I ordered it, and we started her on it. And within a few days my groom, and some of the other ladies that are at the farm realized they noticed a difference in her, so.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, so what things did you notice? We’re talking a few days here, which through all the conversations that we have with hundreds and hundreds of people, and this story is not too far off from a lot of other people, but when you’ve been around the horse industry and you’ve tried lots of things. And then there’s loading doses, and then 60 days, and it’s all that kind of stuff. So you’re saying within a couple days you started noticing results, and what kinds of things did you notice?

Holly Ann Such :

What we all noticed right away was that she seemed to have a little bit more energy, more than usual, and we would turn her out. And a lot of times when we had turned her out, she would just stay by the gate. She wasn’t really willing to walk very far to go and graze. And we noticed that she was going further out into the pasture, she was grazing longer, that she wasn’t laying down as much to get the pressure off of her feet. Like I said before with her Cushings, we noticed that her coat seemed to almost stop growing as quickly as it was before.

Holly Ann Such :

Just all around, she just seemed happier every single day. And every day it just got better and better and better. So we just kept an eye on her. We really couldn’t believe what we were seeing, that she went from acting like she was walking on hot coals, to within a couple of weeks she was trotting around the pasture. And last week I actually witnessed her galloping from the far end of the pasture to the gate, which we haven’t seen in probably a year. So, yes. So all of us stopped, and we’re like,” Oh my goodness. Promise is actually galloping across the field.” And none of us could really believe it, but she was.

John Dowdy:

Wow. And one of the other things that you had mentioned as well, that she used to sway her stall. Tell us about that.

Holly Ann Such :

Yeah, so she would always sway back and forth in her stall, especially when we would give her her hay in there, to take the pressure off the front of her feet, almost like she was standing on hot coals. And she would pick one foot up and then the other one, and back and forth, and back and forth. And we even tried putting her hay in a hay bag so she wouldn’t have to bend down as far and put pressure on her front feet as much. That did not help at all. Within a few days to a week, we noticed that that had decreased a lot, to the point where we are now, that she does not do that at all, not at all, so.

John Dowdy:

That’s great.

Holly Ann Such :

Yes, and we even put special flooring and her stall. We bed it extra. We did everything, and that did not stop her from swaying until we started her on this.

John Dowdy:

Yes. Now earlier you had mentioned that you had to increase how much Bute you were giving. What is the situation with that now?

Holly Ann Such :

As of right now, we decided to go ahead and take her off the Bute completely once we started to notice some improvements with her. And we pretty much just did that because we know that Bute isn’t great for their tummies, and we don’t want to deal with ulcers on top of everything else. So we made a joint decision to go ahead and take her off of it completely, and then just see how she does. And she’s fine. She doesn’t need it. She doesn’t act like she’s in any pain. She’s really just quite happy the way she is. So she just got her feet trimmed yesterday, and we did not have to Bute her at all. She walked out just as good as when she walked in there. So we’re really excited about that.

John Dowdy:

Yes. Well holy cow. Well you might probably thinking, “Hey, maybe we bring her out of retirement?”

Holly Ann Such :

We had that discussion last week actually.

John Dowdy:

That’s crazy. Oh, wow. Well, I tell you, for those that are tuning in for the first time, maybe you’ve been watching our ads go across your newsfeed, and you’re thinking, “Well that sounds too good to be true,” or, “I’ve tried everything else.” Or, “Hey, maybe you are interested, but you’re thinking, well, what exactly is this stuff?” So let’s get into that, and I’ll explain what this stuff is, how it works. And I’ll give you a CliffsNotes version of it, because we have plenty of places on our website at teamequinety.com that go into a lot more detail.

John Dowdy:

But essentially what this Equinety Horse XL is, it’s 100% pure amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. Now the interesting thing with these, there’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches. And there’s no loading dose. So a serving size is 5.2 grams, which is not quite a tablespoon. And it doesn’t matter the size of the horse, because the pituitary is roughly the same size, about the size of a pea. So when you give this product, it stimulates the pituitary within 24 hours. And this is why you were able to, to see results within days, because this product starts working right away. And the pituitary releases the necessary hormones, which help heal the body at a cellular level.

John Dowdy:

So going back to all the things that you are noticing, it makes sense. When you can give the body what it needs to help heal itself from a cellular level, then why all of a sudden she’s feeling more spry. Now, I think it’s important you said that you noticed that she was more spry or had more energy. Now it doesn’t make the horse hot in any way, shape, or form. They just feel better. So when you get into the healthier coat, and stop swaying because of the pain and things that maybe she was feeling in her feet, these are all the benefits.

John Dowdy:

Now when you get into the Cushing’s disease, which Cushing’s as you know, is a tumor that’s on the pituitary. So now the pituitary is not functioning properly. So what we’ve learned with being on the market almost five years, and we have a lot of people with Cushing’s horses that use our product, great results. We’re helping that pituitary to function properly, or more properly than what it has been. So you’ve noticed the coat isn’t growing as fast. But what I would say, one of the things that we’ve noticed, or in a lot of the feedback with all horses, is a softer shinier coat, more muscle and filling out. They feel better. Now I really want to follow up with you in five or six months, because the sole… How thick are the soles on your horse now?

Holly Ann Such :

I had her x-rayed about two months ago, and they were roughly at two millimeters.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, two millimeters. So thickening of the soles is one of the many things that we hear with using the Equinety product. And so it would be interesting to see, and maybe we could get the before and after of the x-rays to show that. But, and I think it’s also important too, you remember this is not a miracle supplement. It sure does some miraculous things sometimes. You were contemplating on putting this horse down, but typically when we’re talking about supplements, they typically don’t work this fast.

John Dowdy:

When you’re dealing with drugs, and medications, and things, well that usually works right away, because that’s what they’re designed to do. This product, it’s amino acids. And it actually starts the pituitary to release those healing hormones within 24 hours. So it’s a pretty amazing product.

John Dowdy:

Now for anybody that’s tuning in for the first time, and maybe they’re still a little bit hesitant, or thinking, “Well, this sounds too good to be true.” Is there anything Holly, that you might say, or advice that you could give to them, to maybe give them the push over the fence here to give the Equinety product a try?

Holly Ann Such :

I would say the only thing that I really want to stress about the Equinety product is that I was really at my wit’s end. I am a huge believer in not letting your animals suffer. I think it’s very selfish. And I really had that conversation with my husband, that I thought it was time to go ahead and put her down. And this product, even though I don’t think it’s a miracle product, and I don’t think it’s going to work for everyone the same way, but it did work for me. And for the price of the product, it is worth a month’s try. No matter what, you will find some type of results within a few weeks for sure.

Holly Ann Such :

And I have tried every product out there. Nothing’s seemed to help like this one. So for $100 it is worth the life of your animal, if you’re in the same situation as I was. Or it could help with having to retire a horse too early. Something I mentioned earlier, that if I would’ve found this product five years ago, I am 100% confident that I would still be showing her today. So pretty much for the price of it, try it. I really just feel like it’s not going to break the bank, but there are just huge benefits, and for every horse.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, absolutely. And just so you know, that’s a $100 for a hundred servings. So just to be clear there, because although people do, I would say the vast majority, upper 90 percentile I would say, probably do see results in 30 days or less. But our large tub is a $100 for a hundred servings. So very affordable in my opinion, and I think in yours as well. And just without having to give the Bute, the benefits of not having to give that, and you’re saving money in that aspect. So and the horse is, more importantly, healthier and happier all around, which makes for a good happy owner too.

Holly Ann Such :

Absolutely. I’m so happy with this product that I am starting my new show horse on this too as an upper level FEI dressage horse, who gets taxed daily in his workouts. And that’s how much I believe in this product, is that I felt such an amazing result with her, that I feel it will do the same with him for muscle recovery, and just overall feeling better. So I have taken him off most of his supplements, and I’m going to try him on this also.

John Dowdy:

That’s great. Well, we look forward to the updates. So Holly Ann Such out of St Augustine, Florida. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety Podcast.

Holly Ann Such :

Thank you so much for allowing me to share my story with you.

John Dowdy:

Well you bet. All right, thank you. Bye, bye.

Holly Ann Such :

Bye.

 

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  Holly Ann Such – Cushings – Healthier Coat – More Spry - Thin Soles – Feeling Better – Stopped Swaying in Stall   - John Dowdy: - Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're going to swing over into St Augustine, Florida.  <br /> Holly Ann Such – Cushings – Healthier Coat – More Spry -<br /> Thin Soles – Feeling Better – Stopped Swaying in Stall<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're going to swing over into St Augustine, Florida. And we've got Holly Ann Such on the Equinety Podcast this week. Holly, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Holly Ann Such :<br /> <br /> Thank you so much. I'm very excited to be here.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Well, we're excited to have you as well for another great story. I actually came across one of your comments on our Facebook advertising, and what caught my eye was you said, "This stuff works!" with three exclamation points. And then the next line is what got me. You said you were contemplating, "putting my mare down, because she was always in so much pain with her thin sole." So this was a last ditch effort. So tell us about your mare, what her... She's retired now, but what she was doing in her previous life, how long you've had her, and what you were dealing with?<br /> <br /> Holly Ann Such :<br /> <br /> So originally my mare came over from the Netherlands as a jumper, and after she retired from that, we decided to put her into dressage. So my trainer and I worked her up the levels, and we just always knew that her feet weren't fantastic. So we thought being in dressage was probably the best way for her to go. And even in the dressage work, the pressure was too much. She would always end up blowing an abscess, and then we would heal her from that one, get her back in shape, and then another one. It was just a rotating door. We were never really able to keep her sound much longer than a few weeks at a time. So at that point I decided the best thing for her was for me to go ahead and retire her about four years ago, when she was 16.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Right. And so with as you're describing one hoof issue, then the next one I picture when I would take my son to a Chuck E. Cheese, and that one little game where you had the big mallet, and you're trying to whack each one of the little things, the clowns that are popping up. It's like you get this one fixed, and then you got one over here, and then one over here. So it was just a battle all the time. And you were having to use a Bute as I understand, to try to deal with the pain. But she also had a great farrier. So you were able to manage with what you had pretty much all the time?<br /> <br /> Holly Ann Such :<br /> <br /> Yeah. Yes, pretty much. We tried to only give her Bute really every time we would put a new set of shoes on her, or we would try something different with her, she would get really, really sore. And we tried everything from pads, glue on shoes, every type of different shoe you could think of. My farrier and my vet even contacted other, at some farriers around the United States to get ideas about what to do with her. And just nothing seemed to work. And she would just be in so much pain after each trimming that we would have to give her Bute just to make her comfortable.<br /> <br /> Holly Ann Such :<br /> <br /> And then within the last probably six, seven months, she was just in so much constant pain all the time that we started her on a daily dose of Bute, which at that point is when I decided she probably didn't have the best quality of life. And that's when I was contemplating on having to euthanize her. So that's where we were as far as trying to keep her as comfortable as possible, because other than her feet, she's a pretty healthy girl, and everybody loves her. So we just wanted to do what we could for her, but.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Yes. Now in addition to the battling that you were having with her hooves, she's also a Cushing's horse. So you were dealing with things along that using Prascend, and dealing with lots of clippings from long coats.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy 1 052 Holly Ann Such – Cushings – Healthier Coat – More Spry - Thin Soles – Feeling Better – Stopped Swaying in Stall 18:30
051 – Elizabeth Downey – Chronic Bursitis – Lame to Sound Performance Horse https://www.teamequinety.com/051-elizabeth-downey-chronic-bursitis-lame-to-sound-performance-horse/ Wed, 19 Feb 2020 14:00:44 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1886 051 - Elizabeth Downey - Chronic Bursitis - Lame to Sound Performance Horse   John Dowdy: Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We are swinging way up north, at least that's way up north for me. I'm down here in Southwest Florida. We're going across the border up into Montreal, Canada. Elizabeth Downey, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Elizabeth Downey: Hi, John. I'm really happy to share my story with you. John Dowdy: Good. Well, we're excited to have you and I believe, as it is right now, you are our first Canadian guest here on the Equinety podcast, which is exciting. John Dowdy: Tell us a little bit about the horse that you have. You're in the barrel racing world. Tell us a little bit about the history of your horse and what you were dealing with prior to finding Equinety and then how you found Equinety and what your experience was in the initial stages. Elizabeth Downey: All right. So Heidi is a seven-year-old quarter horse that I purchased from my father. She was a roping horse before and I was looking for something to be a little bit more competitive at the show. So my dad said I should try this horse, and eventually she came to be really, really good. So I had some of my good friends, Karen [Chantaz 00:01:11], that was using the Equinety and I thought, I should really give it a try. Elizabeth Downey: So I put the mare on the product and she started really blooming during the season, went from 3d times to 2D times to 1D times. She was very focused and she was very constant to doing a run. So at the end of the year, I was talking to some vets. They were talking about the product saying it was a shake and I should not give that if I wasn't giving exercise to my horse. So not knowing any better, I stopped using the product. And when I started training the mare again for the next season, 2019, she came up really, really lame. John Dowdy: Yeah. So let me jump in real quick. So you started in the season with the Equinety product in 2018 through the summer. And this is where you started seeing all the benefits that you're clocking from 3D to 2D to 1D. You're just noticing obviously the faster times, but focus, recovery, the stamina and everything is going great. Elizabeth Downey: Yeah, exactly. John Dowdy: And then you get to the end of the season, 2018, you're coming around to beginning of 2019 and you show this to your vet and they just say, "Oh, well that's just like a shake. Don't waste your money?" That's kind of what you were told? Elizabeth Downey: Yeah, that was pretty much it. I didn't know any better and then I thought, of course, I'm going to try to keep some money around and then I stopped using the product is my biggest regret because when I started training the mare again at the beginning of 2019, I started having some really sore feet. Of course, there was different showing involved and stuff like that, but she just didn't look how she was the summer before. So I got her checked by the vet and then she started being lame. She was so lame at one point that you could tell it was a four out of five lame on a walk. Elizabeth Downey: So I tried with the vet different orthopedic shoeing. We tried pads, we tried degree pads, we tried egg bars, we tried to injection. I tried to keep her in the stall for a certain amount of time. I try to walk her. We tried just stuff from, I'd say, March until August and there was a lot of money involved into this. Elizabeth Downey: So I decided, you know what, I have nothing to lose. She was doing great when she was on Equinety. I'm just reading all those stuff, all those papers and all the people saying it's such a great product and it's helped them so much that I'm like, you know what, I liked it and might as well put her back on it. Elizabeth Downey: Immediately when I put her back, after a week, I start noticing that she was better. Then I got a different shoe in her just saying,

051 – Elizabeth Downey – Chronic Bursitis – Lame to Sound Performance Horse

 

John Dowdy:

Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We are swinging way up north, at least that’s way up north for me. I’m down here in Southwest Florida. We’re going across the border up into Montreal, Canada. Elizabeth Downey, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Elizabeth Downey:

Hi, John. I’m really happy to share my story with you.

John Dowdy:

Good. Well, we’re excited to have you and I believe, as it is right now, you are our first Canadian guest here on the Equinety podcast, which is exciting.

John Dowdy:

Tell us a little bit about the horse that you have. You’re in the barrel racing world. Tell us a little bit about the history of your horse and what you were dealing with prior to finding Equinety and then how you found Equinety and what your experience was in the initial stages.

Elizabeth Downey:

All right. So Heidi is a seven-year-old quarter horse that I purchased from my father. She was a roping horse before and I was looking for something to be a little bit more competitive at the show. So my dad said I should try this horse, and eventually she came to be really, really good. So I had some of my good friends, Karen [Chantaz 00:01:11], that was using the Equinety and I thought, I should really give it a try.

Elizabeth Downey:

So I put the mare on the product and she started really blooming during the season, went from 3d times to 2D times to 1D times. She was very focused and she was very constant to doing a run. So at the end of the year, I was talking to some vets. They were talking about the product saying it was a shake and I should not give that if I wasn’t giving exercise to my horse. So not knowing any better, I stopped using the product. And when I started training the mare again for the next season, 2019, she came up really, really lame.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. So let me jump in real quick. So you started in the season with the Equinety product in 2018 through the summer. And this is where you started seeing all the benefits that you’re clocking from 3D to 2D to 1D. You’re just noticing obviously the faster times, but focus, recovery, the stamina and everything is going great.

Elizabeth Downey:

Yeah, exactly.

John Dowdy:

And then you get to the end of the season, 2018, you’re coming around to beginning of 2019 and you show this to your vet and they just say, “Oh, well that’s just like a shake. Don’t waste your money?” That’s kind of what you were told?

Elizabeth Downey:

Yeah, that was pretty much it. I didn’t know any better and then I thought, of course, I’m going to try to keep some money around and then I stopped using the product is my biggest regret because when I started training the mare again at the beginning of 2019, I started having some really sore feet. Of course, there was different showing involved and stuff like that, but she just didn’t look how she was the summer before. So I got her checked by the vet and then she started being lame. She was so lame at one point that you could tell it was a four out of five lame on a walk.

Elizabeth Downey:

So I tried with the vet different orthopedic shoeing. We tried pads, we tried degree pads, we tried egg bars, we tried to injection. I tried to keep her in the stall for a certain amount of time. I try to walk her. We tried just stuff from, I’d say, March until August and there was a lot of money involved into this.

Elizabeth Downey:

So I decided, you know what, I have nothing to lose. She was doing great when she was on Equinety. I’m just reading all those stuff, all those papers and all the people saying it’s such a great product and it’s helped them so much that I’m like, you know what, I liked it and might as well put her back on it.

Elizabeth Downey:

Immediately when I put her back, after a week, I start noticing that she was better. Then I got a different shoe in her just saying, you know what, just do what we did with her regular shoe leather rim pad, roller motion. Just keep it when she was doing fine and then after two weeks she started just being good again. Like, she was not shifting her weight from right foot to left foot. She was doing less of it. And after I’d say the end of August, and I’d say by the end of October, she just stopped being lame and I could start riding, well, walk, trot again.

John Dowdy:

That’s pretty amazing. Now for those of you tuning in for the first time, maybe this is the first time that you’ve heard about the Equinety product, or maybe you’ve seen it a couple of times. You’ve been following us around on Facebook, or you’ve heard your friends using it, but you don’t know exactly what it is, here’s what it is and here’s the science behind it.

John Dowdy:

So, first of all, it’s 100% pure amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. There’s no fillers, there’s no sugars, no starches, there’s no loading dose. By the way, a serving size is 5.2 grams, which is not quite a tablespoon. So a lot of people that open this for the first time think, is this it? What was your thoughts when you saw how much the serving size was?

Elizabeth Downey:

So it’s really, really little and I was very happy there’s actually no loading dose so I’ve never gave like a double dose. I’ve always gave that one dose at nighttime and this is something that I all my horses now. But I was very surprised how little you needed and how big it was doing to the horse.

Elizabeth Downey:

I know that a lot of people are skeptical about trying products and adding additives to what they already feed. But there’s definitely something there that actually makes them feel good. It takes a team to take care of athletes like barrel racing horses or roping horses, reiners, but this is part of the big success I had with this mare, so everyone should use it.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. Hey, I agree, Elizabeth. So the science behind this product, these amino acids are specifically put together, formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body about the size of a pea, and that’s what releases hormones. We’re after, of course, growth hormone and IGF-1. The combination of those hormones have a 23 and a half hour life cycle and this is why you give the product every day. But it’s also the reason why the product is so effective. One, because it’s already in the amino acid stage, so it’s ready for absorption right away. The body doesn’t have to break anything down. And second, because it stimulates the pituitary to release the hormones, which help the body heal at a cellular level.

John Dowdy:

So your story is not uncommon, although I will say this is probably the first one I’ve heard where you went so long without using the Equinety, although it did happen again with you because you ran out after a couple of days, which we can tell that little story in a minute, but here’s what’s going on in the body. You give the product, it starts working in 24 hours and now it’s just a matter of what you can start seeing. So it happens really fast and I would say, upper 90 percentile of people notice changes within 30 days or less, which is what you are seeing.

John Dowdy:

Now if you start, I’m sorry, if you stop giving the product, then what happens is is the hormone levels are just what they would normally be for that particular horse. So a lot of times people, they start giving the product, they see these great results and think, “Oh, well, my horse is doing fine” and they stop giving the product. Now the horse goes back to being lame or having the little quirks that it used to have. Then they add the product back and now the horse is fine again.

John Dowdy:

So in this case, veterinarians are… of course, we recommend you should always listen to your veterinarian and your medical team. They know your horses definitely better than we know your horses. But this isn’t just a shake. It’s a very specific amino acid stack that’s given to the body to help what it needs to repair itself, so there’s a little bit of a science behind it.

John Dowdy:

So now as you started your horse back on the product and now up in Canada, it’s cold season there obviously, although a lot of people in the United States think it’s just winter there 24/7 so they’ve never been up there. Like I spent a lot of time in Canada, so aren’t you guys always… Didn’t it always snow up there? No. No. It’s not.

Elizabeth Downey:

No. It gets warm and we get warm sometimes.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, sometimes. Yeah.

Elizabeth Downey:

But yeah. Adding to what you said, I’ve had that happen to me. We ran out of the product and did not order as quick and it’s crazy how after just a couple of days that you’re not giving out the product, that you see changes. It doesn’t come back to 100% lame, but you can tell that they’re not as comfortable as they used to.

Elizabeth Downey:

So in the case of my mare, I can see in her stall when she’s at rest that she starts shifting weight from her front feet, from the right foot to the left foot. And she’s just trying to manage her feet [inaudible 00:10:03] when she’s on the product, and it just takes a couple of days back when you start giving it again. She stands more square and she’s just more of herself on it than off it, definitely.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. She was back on the product and then it came to your attention that you ran out and then what happened over those couple of days there?

Elizabeth Downey:

Yeah, so she started shifting her weight again from her right foot to her left foot. So she’s standing her front limb way ahead of her, just try to get the pressure off her heels. So she started doing that again and so I told my boyfriend, I said, “Well, we need to order that ASAP [inaudible 00:10:49] put her back on the product again.” This is where when you’re skeptical it all comes true because you’re like, okay, so I was giving this, I’m not giving it anymore. Something is changing right now. Then we purchased the product, we started her on it again and then she just came back to where she was standing square again. So I’m like she will never run out of that product anymore ever again.

John Dowdy:

Yes. Now, we didn’t touch upon this earlier, but during all of the issues that you are having, you actually had an MRI and they found out that she had some chronic bursitis. Tell us about… Yeah, so tell us about that and what’s going on now with that.

Elizabeth Downey:

So basically I got really, really excited at the end of October because she had been on Equinety for two months and then I started walking her and trotting her again. You know, my dad raised her so I’ve known this mare a long time and I was like, you know what, I think we got her. I think she’s going to be ready to get ridden again and maybe there’s a chance I can bring her back to the show.

Elizabeth Downey:

So I sent a video to my vet and I said, “Look how good she is right now and you couldn’t see any lameness or anything.” So she’s like, “Yeah, but I’m scared if you really ride her hard again that she’ll come back. So let’s go do an MRI, find out what she has and then we’ll go from there.”

Elizabeth Downey:

So I sent her to the vet clinic, got her an MRI. So they found that she has a chronic bursitis and they were very impressed of how the inflammation was not there for how lame she has been in the past year.

John Dowdy:

Right. And for those of you who may not know what chronic bursitis is, it’s just a chronic inflammation of the bursa really put it in simple terms. But with the use of the Equinety, there was just nothing there. That kind of fixed that up.

Elizabeth Downey:

It kind of got the inflammation non-active, yeah. So what they found in her feet basically was non-active. So they say if we can keep her that way and we can train her a little bit during winter, get her a bit of rehab, I am positive that I can take her back to the show in probably June.

John Dowdy:

Oh, that’s great. Yeah. Well, in a lot of situations where you’re dealing with an inflammatory type of a thing, the Equinety product does have a high level of L-arginine. L-arginine as one of the amino acids that also helps with inflammation. It helps open the vein so you have more blood flow, more oxygen and, of course, the oxygen is helping with the healing and the inflammation as well. So, awesome.

John Dowdy:

Well, Elizabeth, I really appreciate you taking the time to share your Equinety story. If there’s anybody listening for the first time that might be a little bit skeptical still yet, is there anything that you would have to share with them to maybe get them to go ahead and give it a try?

Elizabeth Downey:

Definitely. I was raised in a farm. My dad was always being very simple with the horses. We’ve never really given any additives and there’s so much things that this product can do, different types of things. Like, if you have a mare that has hormonal issues, that they get really high heat, then it’s very good to it. I’ve seen some really good changes on my mare with that. If you just want to have a little step up for your barrel horse, you want them a little stronger, more stamina, just try the product. Buy the 90 days, a little bottle, try it. And if you’re still skeptical after 30 days I would be very, very surprised.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. Yeah, it does work very, very fast. Well, awesome. Elizabeth Downey out of Montreal, Canada. Thank you so much for being here on the Equinety podcast.

Elizabeth Downey:

Well, thank you very much for having me.

John Dowdy:

Oh, you bet. Thank you. Bye-bye.

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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051 - Elizabeth Downey - Chronic Bursitis - Lame to Sound Performance Horse   - John Dowdy: - Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We are swinging way up north, at least that's way up north for me. I'm down here in Southwest Florida. 051 - Elizabeth Downey - Chronic Bursitis - Lame to Sound Performance Horse<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We are swinging way up north, at least that's way up north for me. I'm down here in Southwest Florida. We're going across the border up into Montreal, Canada. Elizabeth Downey, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Downey:<br /> <br /> Hi, John. I'm really happy to share my story with you.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Good. Well, we're excited to have you and I believe, as it is right now, you are our first Canadian guest here on the Equinety podcast, which is exciting.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Tell us a little bit about the horse that you have. You're in the barrel racing world. Tell us a little bit about the history of your horse and what you were dealing with prior to finding Equinety and then how you found Equinety and what your experience was in the initial stages.<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Downey:<br /> <br /> All right. So Heidi is a seven-year-old quarter horse that I purchased from my father. She was a roping horse before and I was looking for something to be a little bit more competitive at the show. So my dad said I should try this horse, and eventually she came to be really, really good. So I had some of my good friends, Karen [Chantaz 00:01:11], that was using the Equinety and I thought, I should really give it a try.<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Downey:<br /> <br /> So I put the mare on the product and she started really blooming during the season, went from 3d times to 2D times to 1D times. She was very focused and she was very constant to doing a run. So at the end of the year, I was talking to some vets. They were talking about the product saying it was a shake and I should not give that if I wasn't giving exercise to my horse. So not knowing any better, I stopped using the product. And when I started training the mare again for the next season, 2019, she came up really, really lame.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Yeah. So let me jump in real quick. So you started in the season with the Equinety product in 2018 through the summer. And this is where you started seeing all the benefits that you're clocking from 3D to 2D to 1D. You're just noticing obviously the faster times, but focus, recovery, the stamina and everything is going great.<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Downey:<br /> <br /> Yeah, exactly.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> And then you get to the end of the season, 2018, you're coming around to beginning of 2019 and you show this to your vet and they just say, "Oh, well that's just like a shake. Don't waste your money?" That's kind of what you were told?<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Downey:<br /> <br /> Yeah, that was pretty much it. I didn't know any better and then I thought, of course, I'm going to try to keep some money around and then I stopped using the product is my biggest regret because when I started training the mare again at the beginning of 2019, I started having some really sore feet. Of course, there was different showing involved and stuff like that, but she just didn't look how she was the summer before. So I got her checked by the vet and then she started being lame. She was so lame at one point that you could tell it was a four out of five lame on a walk.<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Downey:<br /> <br /> So I tried with the vet different orthopedic shoeing. We tried pads, we tried degree pads, we tried egg bars, we tried to injection. I tried to keep her in the stall for a certain amount of time. I try to walk her. We tried just stuff from, I'd say, March until August and there was a lot of money involved into this.<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Downey:<br /> <br /> So I decided, you know what, I have nothing to lose. She was doing great when she was on Equinety. I'm just reading all those stuff, all those papers and all the people saying it's ... John Dowdy 1 15:12
050 – Judy Collins – Roping Horses – Retired – Sinus Infection – Ring Bone – Weak Hoof Walls – Strong hooves now barefoot – Happy and Sound https://www.teamequinety.com/050-judy-collins-roping-horses-retired-sinus-infection-ring-bone-weak-hoof-walls-strong-hooves-now-barefoot-happy-and-sound/ Wed, 12 Feb 2020 14:00:51 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1881   Judy Collins – Roping Horses – Retired - Sinus Infection – Ring Bone – Weak Hoof Walls - Strong hooves now barefoot – Happy and Sound   John Dowdy: Hello and welcome to this week Equinety podcast. We're going to swing down into some serious horse country in Weatherford, Texas. We've got Judy Collins here on the Equinety podcast this week. Judy, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Judy Collins: Thank you. Thank you for letting me tell my story. John Dowdy: Oh, absolutely. We're excited as always and what caught my eye, of course we run a lot of Facebook advertising and I believe it was you had posted a comment because you were dealing with an older retired horse, 30 years old and dealing with the sinus infection and you had asked if we thought this product would help. I think the short answer was yes, because it's always going to help with recovery, but tell us exactly what was going on with Hank and what you were dealing with for quite a while. Judy Collins: Well, Hank got an abscess tooth and we had no idea he had it. He had not gone off feed. He had not acted sick. And then we came home one night from a roping and he had discharge coming out of one side of his nose and it smelled terrible, it reeked. You could smell it the minute you walked into the barn. And we FaceTimed my son and his wife are vets here in Weatherford and they said, "Well he has an abscess tooth. Bring him into the clinic. We'll take care of it." We took him to the clinic and they couldn't get the tooth pulled and they did an X-ray of his sinus cavity and it was full of infection, so they ended up having to do a surgery. And they did the surgery. They kept him for a week and treated him there at the clinic. Judy Collins: And then we brought him home and in this process they had drilled a hole in between his eyes on his forehead for this infection to drain out. And then we had to take a tube and put it in that hole and flush those sinuses out and we did that for about a month and a half until the hole finally closed up. And he was on strong, strong antibiotics the whole time this was happening. As soon as he went off the antibiotics, about two or three weeks, we started getting the discharge again and the strong odor. And so we just have to keep putting him on antibiotics. And they tried multiple brands of antibiotics and as soon as he would go off it would come back. So then we ultimately ended up doing a second surgery and this time they put a port in his forehead and we still had to go back to all the flushing. Judy Collins: And we did that for about another month, three weeks to a month and then they took all that out. And again, we just were constantly the sinus infection. And as soon as he would go off antibiotics, it would start back up again. And so we did this for two years on and off with antibiotics. We did a hair analysis with vet in Pilot Point and had supplements made specifically for him to help build his immune system up and so on. And during all that, we were still battling this. It just wasn't going away. I'd seen an ad on Facebook for Equinety and I messaged you guys and I asked, "This is what we're dealing with, do you think this will help?" And your response was certainly you thought it would help, so I was willing to give it a try and we tried it and we bought the big tub, which is a 90-day supply and about 60 days into it I started seeing a difference and he had been on antibiotics the first month with it, we'd taken him off and I would say by the end of the 90 days we were at a point where there was no antibiotics at all anymore. John Dowdy: Wow. Judy Collins: Yeah, we were very impressed and that was the only thing we had changed in his routine was the Equinety. John Dowdy: Well in all of that time in the surgeries and what was his attitude and demeanor like going through all this? Judy Collins: Well, he's one of those super calm, super easy to work with horses.

 

Judy Collins – Roping Horses – Retired – Sinus Infection – Ring Bone –
Weak Hoof Walls – Strong hooves now barefoot – Happy and Sound

 

John Dowdy:

Hello and welcome to this week Equinety podcast. We’re going to swing down into some serious horse country in Weatherford, Texas. We’ve got Judy Collins here on the Equinety podcast this week. Judy, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Judy Collins:

Thank you. Thank you for letting me tell my story.

John Dowdy:

Oh, absolutely. We’re excited as always and what caught my eye, of course we run a lot of Facebook advertising and I believe it was you had posted a comment because you were dealing with an older retired horse, 30 years old and dealing with the sinus infection and you had asked if we thought this product would help. I think the short answer was yes, because it’s always going to help with recovery, but tell us exactly what was going on with Hank and what you were dealing with for quite a while.

Judy Collins:

Well, Hank got an abscess tooth and we had no idea he had it. He had not gone off feed. He had not acted sick. And then we came home one night from a roping and he had discharge coming out of one side of his nose and it smelled terrible, it reeked. You could smell it the minute you walked into the barn. And we FaceTimed my son and his wife are vets here in Weatherford and they said, “Well he has an abscess tooth. Bring him into the clinic. We’ll take care of it.” We took him to the clinic and they couldn’t get the tooth pulled and they did an X-ray of his sinus cavity and it was full of infection, so they ended up having to do a surgery. And they did the surgery. They kept him for a week and treated him there at the clinic.

Judy Collins:

And then we brought him home and in this process they had drilled a hole in between his eyes on his forehead for this infection to drain out. And then we had to take a tube and put it in that hole and flush those sinuses out and we did that for about a month and a half until the hole finally closed up. And he was on strong, strong antibiotics the whole time this was happening. As soon as he went off the antibiotics, about two or three weeks, we started getting the discharge again and the strong odor. And so we just have to keep putting him on antibiotics. And they tried multiple brands of antibiotics and as soon as he would go off it would come back. So then we ultimately ended up doing a second surgery and this time they put a port in his forehead and we still had to go back to all the flushing.

Judy Collins:

And we did that for about another month, three weeks to a month and then they took all that out. And again, we just were constantly the sinus infection. And as soon as he would go off antibiotics, it would start back up again. And so we did this for two years on and off with antibiotics. We did a hair analysis with vet in Pilot Point and had supplements made specifically for him to help build his immune system up and so on. And during all that, we were still battling this. It just wasn’t going away. I’d seen an ad on Facebook for Equinety and I messaged you guys and I asked, “This is what we’re dealing with, do you think this will help?” And your response was certainly you thought it would help, so I was willing to give it a try and we tried it and we bought the big tub, which is a 90-day supply and about 60 days into it I started seeing a difference and he had been on antibiotics the first month with it, we’d taken him off and I would say by the end of the 90 days we were at a point where there was no antibiotics at all anymore.

John Dowdy:

Wow.

Judy Collins:

Yeah, we were very impressed and that was the only thing we had changed in his routine was the Equinety.

John Dowdy:

Well in all of that time in the surgeries and what was his attitude and demeanor like going through all this?

Judy Collins:

Well, he’s one of those super calm, super easy to work with horses. He was great for us to work with, but I have to tell you, towards the end of us sticking tubes in his forehead and flushing out that sinus cavity, he had had about enough of us. He was not fighting us, but he was beat down, he wasn’t himself. He was just kind of beat down emotionally and physically, because it was taking a toll on his body and he had lost some weight. And with an older horse, when they start losing weight, it’s really difficult to get it back on. And anyway, he has done a complete turnaround. He’s healthy. His hair coat’s healthy. In fact, we had Fred now here the other day who is a retired vet and he couldn’t believe it. He goes, “Man, I can’t believe how good that horse looks.” He said, “Usually the first thing you can tell that they’re going downhill is their hair coat.” And he says, “His hair coat looks great.” He said, “He looks awesome.”

John Dowdy:

Yeah. Well, I would say that’s probably one of the most common things that people notice when they put their horses on Equinety and typically within 30 days is a softer, shinier coat. So it is definitely one of the things that it helps with, not to mention this huge recovery that he was having to go through and a sinus infection and oh my goodness.

Judy Collins:

Yep, he’s doing great.

John Dowdy:

So you were able to get him through all of that and as you told me earlier, he was being retired, he was more for the grandkids to ride around on, but he was having some other issues with his hooves and things. Tell us about that.

Judy Collins:

Yes, he had been diagnosed with navicular about 10 years ago and we had him in special shoes and then he developed a ringbone and he was mobile and we just kept him comfortable and he was retired and we were spending like $280 with the farrier every time we had him shot just in these special shoes and stuff to keep him comfortable and keeping moving. In the process of using the Equinety for the sinus infection, not even thinking about the other, we just assumed we were going to have that until the day he died. We started noticing his feet were getting better, they were getting stronger, his hooves were growing a little faster and the farrier just kept working with him and three weeks ago the farrier was here and he said he’s ready to go barefoot. And so he’s barefoot now and I told the farrier, I said, “Well, I’m going to have you on speed dial because I’m not sure he’s going to be able to do this.” And he said, “Just call me. I’ll be there. I’ll come as soon as I can get there and we’ll put shoes back on him if we have to.” It’s been three weeks and he has not taken a lame step and he’s out in the pasture running with the other horses and he’s on 25 acres of pasture with the other horses and he’s doing fine.

John Dowdy:

Feeling great.

Judy Collins:

Yeah, he’s feeling young again.

John Dowdy:

Wow. Well for those who are tuning in for the first time, maybe you’ve just learned about the Equinety product, you’ve kind of seen it around or heard a little bit, but don’t know that much about it. What it is, it’s 100% pure amino acids, there’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches, and there’s no loading dose. A serving size is 5.2 grams, which is not quite a tablespoon, which by the way, Judy, I didn’t ask you this, but were you surprised at how little a serving size was?

Judy Collins:

I was. I was, I kept thinking there’s no way that little bit of stuff is going to work, but I did it and it did. It proved me wrong.

John Dowdy:

Yeah. So the amino acids in this product, they’re specifically combined and formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body and that’s what releases the necessary hormones, which help the body heal at a cellular level. So in this case, although you were specifically looking for a product to help with the sinus infection and not knowing that it was going to help with the ringbone and navicular, the hoof growth. We try to tell people all the time, this is not a miracle supplement, it although borders on sub miraculous things sometimes, but used in combination with a great farrier as in this case, it’s a great combination because it’s helping those hooves to grow faster, which allows the farrier something to work with and it helps speed up the process with everything. So that’s really great. Now tell us what Hank is doing these days. You also told me that he had a little bit of a comeback. Tell us about that.

Judy Collins:

Yes, he got pulled out of retirement about a month ago to go to NRS to perform a wedding. Friends of ours were getting married and they got married during the roping. And what they did is in between the different number of ropings, they had everybody stay in the arena on horseback and then they came in on horseback and my husband performed the wedding ceremony on Hank. So he had his horse Hank and Hank got to be pulled out of retirement, go back to the roping pen one last time and perform a wedding.

John Dowdy:

Oh, that’s awesome. Oh man.

Judy Collins:

He was wonderful.

John Dowdy:

Oh yeah. Sounds like I bet that was quite a sight to see that a wedding like that.

Judy Collins:

Yeah, it was. And everybody was shocked. They’re like, “He’s 30 years old? there’s no way that horse is 30 years old.” We’re like, “Yeah, he is.”

John Dowdy:

Loving life now. So after you saw the benefits that the Equinety gave Hank there, you also have four other horses that are active, so you decided to put the Equinety product on those horses. Tell us about those horses just briefly and why you decided to put them on and what changes have you noticed in those horses?

Judy Collins:

Okay, well we have four horses, two are rope horses, one’s my husband’s head horse, the other one is his heel horse and they go to competitions and he ropes pretty hard on them. The last few months we haven’t been able to go to a lot of ropings because we moved and just the process of moving, he hasn’t got to do as much as normal, but because he does haul them quite a bit and go to the practice pin quite a bit he decided for maintenance he wanted them on it and I’m like, “Well I’m putting mine on it too.” So we have all four horses on it and we just keep them on it and one our horses that we have a paint horse that his hair is extremely shiny, just since he’s been on it, he glows. At one of the team rope ins he was warming up and he was in the outdoor arena and the drill team was there that was going to perform and do the national anthem and the girls wrote up to him and they said, “What kind of shampoo are you using on your horse?” And he said, “Water.”

John Dowdy:

Oh, that’s funny.

Judy Collins:

And they just couldn’t believe how shiny that horse was, but it was the Equinety. They all shine like that now.

John Dowdy:

Wow. Yep. And has he noticed, recovery stamina? These are performance horses that are in pretty good shape, so what kinds of things has he noticed?

Judy Collins:

Well, he has noticed that their stamina for one thing, they can go out there and chase four or five steers, six steers and they’re not even breathing hard, they’re just muscled up and their stamina is really great. Also, from the recovery standpoint, he wanted to make sure that their muscles and stuff were recovering faster, which is one of the things the Equinety says it does and that was the main reason he put them on there and also hoping to prevent any future problems with the navicular or anything like that.

John Dowdy:

Sure. Awesome. Well, I tell you what a Judy, it’s been a pleasure having you on and for anybody that’s tuning in and again maybe hearing this for the first time, maybe they’re on the fence about giving it a try, would you have any advice or anything to say to them to maybe get them to go ahead and give it a try for themselves?

Judy Collins:

I would recommend anybody that has any kind of health issues with their horses, hoof issues with their horses to put them on it. It’s the best money you will ever spend and it’s not a gimmick, it really works. But it is, it is the best money you can spend to invest in your horse’s health.

John Dowdy:

Great. I agree. I agree with that. So awesome.

Judy Collins:

We love it.

John Dowdy:

Yeah, we’re blessed. It is an amazing product. Well, Judy Collins out of Weatherford, Texas. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your stories here on the Equinety podcast.

Judy Collins:

Thank you.

John Dowdy:

Thank you. Bye bye.

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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  Judy Collins – Roping Horses – Retired - Sinus Infection – Ring Bone – Weak Hoof Walls - Strong hooves now barefoot – Happy and Sound   - John Dowdy: - Hello and welcome to this week Equinety podcast.  <br /> Judy Collins – Roping Horses – Retired - Sinus Infection – Ring Bone –<br /> Weak Hoof Walls - Strong hooves now barefoot – Happy and Sound<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Hello and welcome to this week Equinety podcast. We're going to swing down into some serious horse country in Weatherford, Texas. We've got Judy Collins here on the Equinety podcast this week. Judy, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Judy Collins:<br /> <br /> Thank you. Thank you for letting me tell my story.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Oh, absolutely. We're excited as always and what caught my eye, of course we run a lot of Facebook advertising and I believe it was you had posted a comment because you were dealing with an older retired horse, 30 years old and dealing with the sinus infection and you had asked if we thought this product would help. I think the short answer was yes, because it's always going to help with recovery, but tell us exactly what was going on with Hank and what you were dealing with for quite a while.<br /> <br /> Judy Collins:<br /> <br /> Well, Hank got an abscess tooth and we had no idea he had it. He had not gone off feed. He had not acted sick. And then we came home one night from a roping and he had discharge coming out of one side of his nose and it smelled terrible, it reeked. You could smell it the minute you walked into the barn. And we FaceTimed my son and his wife are vets here in Weatherford and they said, "Well he has an abscess tooth. Bring him into the clinic. We'll take care of it." We took him to the clinic and they couldn't get the tooth pulled and they did an X-ray of his sinus cavity and it was full of infection, so they ended up having to do a surgery. And they did the surgery. They kept him for a week and treated him there at the clinic.<br /> <br /> Judy Collins:<br /> <br /> And then we brought him home and in this process they had drilled a hole in between his eyes on his forehead for this infection to drain out. And then we had to take a tube and put it in that hole and flush those sinuses out and we did that for about a month and a half until the hole finally closed up. And he was on strong, strong antibiotics the whole time this was happening. As soon as he went off the antibiotics, about two or three weeks, we started getting the discharge again and the strong odor. And so we just have to keep putting him on antibiotics. And they tried multiple brands of antibiotics and as soon as he would go off it would come back. So then we ultimately ended up doing a second surgery and this time they put a port in his forehead and we still had to go back to all the flushing.<br /> <br /> Judy Collins:<br /> <br /> And we did that for about another month, three weeks to a month and then they took all that out. And again, we just were constantly the sinus infection. And as soon as he would go off antibiotics, it would start back up again. And so we did this for two years on and off with antibiotics. We did a hair analysis with vet in Pilot Point and had supplements made specifically for him to help build his immune system up and so on. And during all that, we were still battling this. It just wasn't going away. I'd seen an ad on Facebook for Equinety and I messaged you guys and I asked, "This is what we're dealing with, do you think this will help?" And your response was certainly you thought it would help, so I was willing to give it a try and we tried it and we bought the big tub, which is a 90-day supply and about 60 days into it I started seeing a difference and he had been on antibiotics the first month with it, we'd taken him off and I would say by the end of the 90 days we were at a point where there was no antibiotics at all anymore.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Wow.<br /> <br /> Judy Collins:<br /> <br /> Yeah, we were very impressed and that was the only thing we had changed in his routine was the Equinety.<br /> John Dowdy clean 15:23
049 – Danielle Thumma – Lameness – Stifles – Injections – Lot of Pain – Unhappy – Depressed https://www.teamequinety.com/049-danielle-thumma-lameness-stifles-injections-lot-of-pain-unhappy-depressed/ Wed, 05 Feb 2020 15:37:00 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1879 Danielle Thumma - Lameness – Stifles – Injections Lot of Pain – Unhappy – Depressed   John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're swinging up into Maryland this week and we've got Danielle Thumma on the line here. Danielle, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Danielle Thumma:         Hi, John. Thank you for having me today. John Dowdy:                 Well, you're very welcome. And once again, we're always excited to have our guests here on the Equinety podcast. And this one, well, I think I had reached out to you. I saw you comment on one of the ads that we had going and you started off something like this, "I love, love, love Equinety. It truly saved my horse's life." I said, "Okay, let's hear this one." Because we do hear some pretty amazing stories. I tell people all the time, this is not a miracle supplement. It's not the end all, be all. You got to have the proper care and nutrition and veterinarian care and farriers and all the stuff that comes along with taking care of a horse. But when you're able to add this Equinety product to those things, sometimes things can turn out to be a miraculous situation. So you also have been working in the veterinarian field for about 10 years, I believe it was? Danielle Thumma:         Yeah. Yeah. That's right. John Dowdy:                 10 years. So you work for an equine vet. So tell us a little bit about the horse that you have here. How long have you had this horse? What was going on? And we'll start there. Danielle Thumma:         Sure. So MVP is a 17 year old thoroughbred off the track. I've had him since he was four, so about, I guess, 13 years now. And he was supposed to be my event horse, which he didn't exactly like and then we found fox hunting was something he enjoyed. About five years ago, he started having some soundness issues in his hind end and we narrowed it down to stifles and we did some injections and they helped for a while and then it got to the point where they just weren't keeping him sound and comfortable. I took him down to Morven Park to see one of the surgeons there. And they basically looked at everything and said that there was nothing that could really be done to repair his stifles. Danielle Thumma:         So after that, we kept him, we tried doing small paddock and stall rest and none of it really made any difference and he was very unhappy. So it progressed to the point where we put him on, he was on Bute twice a day and we had to increase his dose to about four grams a day, which is a really high dose for horses. The recommended dose is one gram twice a day for no more than seven to 10 days. But the Bute worked for a little while and then it stopped working. And then my boss and I looked into other pain relief sources. We did some dexamethazone, which is a steroid. And he was on 40 milligrams a day, which was a very high dose, not recommended for longterm use. Danielle Thumma:         And it got to the point where that was not keeping him pasture sound. He was uncomfortable, he would very quietly walk around. There was no more exuberant running around happiness. So I was sort of faced with the decision that it was going to be best to euthanize. And I saw the ad for Equinety on Facebook. So I clicked on it and I looked into it for a bit and I decided that it was worth a shot. It wasn't going to hurt him. It wasn't going to cost me an arm and a leg to see if it made any difference. So I ordered it and I got him started on it. And within about two weeks he was happier and running around with his buddies again. And just really a completely different horse. John Dowdy:                 So from a horse that you were looking at having to just put down because of the pain. You'd tried everything else from Bute to steroids, the surgeon said surgery wouldn't help at all. So here you are looking at possible having to put this horse down and within two weeks of using Equinety he's running arou...

Danielle Thumma – Lameness – Stifles – Injections
Lot of Pain – Unhappy – Depressed

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We’re swinging up into Maryland this week and we’ve got Danielle Thumma on the line here. Danielle, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Danielle Thumma:         Hi, John. Thank you for having me today.

John Dowdy:                 Well, you’re very welcome. And once again, we’re always excited to have our guests here on the Equinety podcast. And this one, well, I think I had reached out to you. I saw you comment on one of the ads that we had going and you started off something like this, “I love, love, love Equinety. It truly saved my horse’s life.” I said, “Okay, let’s hear this one.” Because we do hear some pretty amazing stories. I tell people all the time, this is not a miracle supplement. It’s not the end all, be all. You got to have the proper care and nutrition and veterinarian care and farriers and all the stuff that comes along with taking care of a horse. But when you’re able to add this Equinety product to those things, sometimes things can turn out to be a miraculous situation. So you also have been working in the veterinarian field for about 10 years, I believe it was?

Danielle Thumma:         Yeah. Yeah. That’s right.

John Dowdy:                 10 years. So you work for an equine vet. So tell us a little bit about the horse that you have here. How long have you had this horse? What was going on? And we’ll start there.

Danielle Thumma:         Sure. So MVP is a 17 year old thoroughbred off the track. I’ve had him since he was four, so about, I guess, 13 years now. And he was supposed to be my event horse, which he didn’t exactly like and then we found fox hunting was something he enjoyed. About five years ago, he started having some soundness issues in his hind end and we narrowed it down to stifles and we did some injections and they helped for a while and then it got to the point where they just weren’t keeping him sound and comfortable. I took him down to Morven Park to see one of the surgeons there. And they basically looked at everything and said that there was nothing that could really be done to repair his stifles.

Danielle Thumma:         So after that, we kept him, we tried doing small paddock and stall rest and none of it really made any difference and he was very unhappy. So it progressed to the point where we put him on, he was on Bute twice a day and we had to increase his dose to about four grams a day, which is a really high dose for horses. The recommended dose is one gram twice a day for no more than seven to 10 days. But the Bute worked for a little while and then it stopped working. And then my boss and I looked into other pain relief sources. We did some dexamethazone, which is a steroid. And he was on 40 milligrams a day, which was a very high dose, not recommended for longterm use.

Danielle Thumma:         And it got to the point where that was not keeping him pasture sound. He was uncomfortable, he would very quietly walk around. There was no more exuberant running around happiness. So I was sort of faced with the decision that it was going to be best to euthanize. And I saw the ad for Equinety on Facebook. So I clicked on it and I looked into it for a bit and I decided that it was worth a shot. It wasn’t going to hurt him. It wasn’t going to cost me an arm and a leg to see if it made any difference. So I ordered it and I got him started on it. And within about two weeks he was happier and running around with his buddies again. And just really a completely different horse.

John Dowdy:                 So from a horse that you were looking at having to just put down because of the pain. You’d tried everything else from Bute to steroids, the surgeon said surgery wouldn’t help at all. So here you are looking at possible having to put this horse down and within two weeks of using Equinety he’s running around?

Danielle Thumma:         Yes. Yeah. I mean it was really pretty miraculous because I was devastated. I mean, this was the first horse I bought for myself and I had big plans for us and really love him dearly. And the fact that he was so uncomfortable was just making me absolutely sick over it. I mean, he was miserable all the time. You could just see it in his eyes. Everything he did hurt and with the Equinety, he just, he turned around and he’s got bright, happy eyes again and he races around and plays and it’s everything I could have asked for.

John Dowdy:                 Oh my gosh. Now I often ask this question a lot. I don’t know what you’re going to say when I ask you this, because I didn’t pre-ask you this question, but were you surprised by the dosage amount of this product?

Danielle Thumma:         Yes. Yeah. I mean it’s really a small scoop.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, yeah. 5.2 grams, which is not quite a tablespoon. Yeah. So that is something. Now, for those of you who are tuning in for the first time, and maybe you’ve seen the ads running around there on the internets. Maybe you’re dealing with the situation… in this case, Danielle, you were literally at your wit’s end. And now I’m sure do all this stuff with the guidance of your boss and your veterinarian. What was his thoughts or did you just buy it and try it? Or did he have any insight on the product when you showed it to him? Or did you just… ?

Danielle Thumma:         Yeah, I showed it to him and I said, “What do you think about this?” And he said, “Try it.” He basically said he couldn’t guarantee that it was going to work or help. And he said it wasn’t going to hurt the horse. So there was nothing wrong with trying it. And yeah, he’s been thoroughly impressed by the results.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, that’s impressive. So for those tuning in for the first time, and you might be wondering what this stuff is. So it’s 100% pure amino acids. There is no fillers, no sugars, no starches, and there’s no loading dose. And as we mentioned just a few minutes ago, it’s a very small amount. And the reason that is, is because these amino acids are specifically formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland on the body. And that’s what releases the hormones that help heal the body at a cellular level.

John Dowdy:                 So we’ve had plenty of podcasts where we’ve had people talk about two, three, six, seven different horses that have, they’re all dealing with separate things. They all get one scoop of Equinety and they’re all affected to what that horse needs. So it’s customizing to each horse and that’s because each horse’s body is releasing its own hormones and the body knows exactly where to send those hormones for the healing. So that’s a little bit of the science and how this stuff works and why it works. And we’ve just seen and heard so many stories. And again, I say it’s not a miracle supplement, but it might have to borderline on this story, in this particular case, I would have to say that.

Danielle Thumma:         Yes. I mean, it’s been a miracle for us. I mean, I won’t not have it in my barn at this point. It’s what saved him.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Now are you having to give him any other things?

Danielle Thumma:         No.

John Dowdy:                 Any of Bute or any of the steroids or anything like that?

Danielle Thumma:         No.

John Dowdy:                 Just giving him this?

Danielle Thumma:         No, he hasn’t. He is on Sentinel Blue Seal Performance Feed and Equinety and that is it.

John Dowdy:                 Wow. And so he’s retired now.

Danielle Thumma:         He’s retired. Yeah. He looks sound enough to me that I could probably trail ride him, but that is just not the type of horse that he is. He would not tolerate that or without being in some actual consistent work. And at this point, with his age and the wear on his joints, I want to push him to do something. So, but he is happy as can be. And that’s all I really wanted.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, that is amazing. Wow. Well, I tell you what, if there’s anybody tuning in for the first time, and again, maybe they’re just now hearing about this, or they’ve been looking at it. If they are on the fence about trying the product, is there anything that you could say or any advice that you could give them to maybe just have them say, “Hey, go ahead and try this product.” Anything you want to say about that?

Danielle Thumma:         If you have an issue with your horse and there’s nothing that this product is going to do to harm your horse. It is absolutely worth a shot. And I think you’ll be really amazed with the results that you get.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. That’s great. Well, Danielle, I really appreciate you taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast. Danielle Thumma out of Maryland. Thank you so much.

Danielle Thumma:         Thank you.

John Dowdy:                 All right. Bye-bye.

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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Danielle Thumma - Lameness – Stifles – Injections Lot of Pain – Unhappy – Depressed   - John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're swinging up into Maryland this week and we've got Danielle Thumma on the lin... Danielle Thumma - Lameness – Stifles – Injections<br /> Lot of Pain – Unhappy – Depressed<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're swinging up into Maryland this week and we've got Danielle Thumma on the line here. Danielle, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Danielle Thumma:         Hi, John. Thank you for having me today.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Well, you're very welcome. And once again, we're always excited to have our guests here on the Equinety podcast. And this one, well, I think I had reached out to you. I saw you comment on one of the ads that we had going and you started off something like this, "I love, love, love Equinety. It truly saved my horse's life." I said, "Okay, let's hear this one." Because we do hear some pretty amazing stories. I tell people all the time, this is not a miracle supplement. It's not the end all, be all. You got to have the proper care and nutrition and veterinarian care and farriers and all the stuff that comes along with taking care of a horse. But when you're able to add this Equinety product to those things, sometimes things can turn out to be a miraculous situation. So you also have been working in the veterinarian field for about 10 years, I believe it was?<br /> <br /> Danielle Thumma:         Yeah. Yeah. That's right.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 10 years. So you work for an equine vet. So tell us a little bit about the horse that you have here. How long have you had this horse? What was going on? And we'll start there.<br /> <br /> Danielle Thumma:         Sure. So MVP is a 17 year old thoroughbred off the track. I've had him since he was four, so about, I guess, 13 years now. And he was supposed to be my event horse, which he didn't exactly like and then we found fox hunting was something he enjoyed. About five years ago, he started having some soundness issues in his hind end and we narrowed it down to stifles and we did some injections and they helped for a while and then it got to the point where they just weren't keeping him sound and comfortable. I took him down to Morven Park to see one of the surgeons there. And they basically looked at everything and said that there was nothing that could really be done to repair his stifles.<br /> <br /> Danielle Thumma:         So after that, we kept him, we tried doing small paddock and stall rest and none of it really made any difference and he was very unhappy. So it progressed to the point where we put him on, he was on Bute twice a day and we had to increase his dose to about four grams a day, which is a really high dose for horses. The recommended dose is one gram twice a day for no more than seven to 10 days. But the Bute worked for a little while and then it stopped working. And then my boss and I looked into other pain relief sources. We did some dexamethazone, which is a steroid. And he was on 40 milligrams a day, which was a very high dose, not recommended for longterm use.<br /> <br /> Danielle Thumma:         And it got to the point where that was not keeping him pasture sound. He was uncomfortable, he would very quietly walk around. There was no more exuberant running around happiness. So I was sort of faced with the decision that it was going to be best to euthanize. And I saw the ad for Equinety on Facebook. So I clicked on it and I looked into it for a bit and I decided that it was worth a shot. It wasn't going to hurt him. It wasn't going to cost me an arm and a leg to see if it made any difference. So I ordered it and I got him started on it. And within about two weeks he was happier and running around with his buddies again. And just really a completely different horse.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 So from a horse that you were looking at having to just put down because of the pain. You'd tried everything else from Bute to steroids, the surgeon said surgery wouldn't help at all. John Dowdy clean 10:31
048 – Lisa Lyons – Sole Depth – Underweight – More Focus – Better Attitude – More Topline – Muscle Quality – Cushings https://www.teamequinety.com/048-lisa-lyons-sole-depth-underweight-more-focus-better-attitude-more-topline-muscle-quality-cushings/ Wed, 29 Jan 2020 14:00:40 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1851     Lisa Lyons - Sole Depth - Underweight – More Focus – Better Attitude – More Topline – Muscle Quality – Cushings   John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing out to the West Coast of California. That's West Coast for me because I'm in Florida. Lisa Lyons out of California. Welcome to the some other podcast. Lisa Lyons:        Thank you. It's great to be here. John Dowdy:     Well we're excited to have you. A couple of weeks ago you sent me some before and after pictures of your horse's hoof that was severely foundered. And the pictures are quite shocking. We've been running this as an ad for the last couple of weeks and it's got a lot of activity. And let's just talk about this particular horse, how long you've had him and how did you learn about the Equinety and what were your thoughts when you first got the Equinety? Lisa Lyons:        Okay, well Calvin is a 10 year old, 17 hand, national show horse. I've had him for two and a half years. He was purchased as a project horse. He was underweight, under muscled, didn't have the greatest feet, but had a heart and soul. So got him, got him into training, was given a sample of your product at a horse show. And like so many samples, threw it in my bag, didn't think too much of it at the time. Lisa Lyons:        When I got home I decided to read the back of it, do a little research, was impressed with the ingredients, the testimonials seemed good. It's not a banned substance. I can give it to my horses that go to USCF shows, not worry about any drug testing problems. And right off the bat I noticed with Calvin he seemed more focused, more calm, better attitude, better focus. And as an added bonus he was in training, was getting good nutrition and good farrier care. But he started developing a much better top line, better muscle quality and unbeknownst to me, it was helping him grow his soles. He didn't have the greatest feet and had some corrective shoeing done. Lisa Lyons:        And anyway, flash forward to previous May, he'd been doing great and then came down with a severe case of mechanical founder. It happened very quickly. One day he was fine, next day I got the call and it was a touch and go for a while. He had to be hospitalized twice. A lot of radiograph, a lot of vet care, change of diet during his vet care. He was hooked up to IVs because everything got so inflamed. And one thing my vet commented on during all the radiographs was that he had a good amount of sole which probably saved his life. Because when he rotated the coffin bone it didn't drop down due to the sickness of his soles. John Dowdy:     Yeah, so just to reiterate, so you had him for two and a half years. After about six months of owning him is when you started him on the Equinety and that's where you really noticed the muscle quality, the attitude focus, and a little did you know it was also helping with the sole depth, which is obviously came in handy for this mechanical founder. Now for those that are tuning in and have never heard of mechanical founder, could you tell us exactly what that is? Lisa Lyons:        Sure. I mean, in my layman's terms, I'm not a vet. Most founder is caused by something metabolic and in some other instance, Cushing's, are highly susceptible to laminatic issues and with mechanical founder due to confirmation. And his confirmation is very straight up and down. And that's how it was explained to me by the vet. John Dowdy:     Yeah. And I find that... Well I would say what I want to say is, I find this interesting because it's the first story that I've heard of where, you had started the horse on the Equinety product and he was on it for a year and a half. And then this happened where, well, it would have been life ending for him if it wouldn't have been the sole depth. Lisa Lyons:        Absolutely. John Dowdy:     And here's the one thing that we tried to get across to people and a lot ...  

 

Lisa Lyons – Sole Depth – Underweight – More Focus –
Better Attitude – More Topline – Muscle Quality – Cushings

 

John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We’re going to swing out to the West Coast of California. That’s West Coast for me because I’m in Florida. Lisa Lyons out of California. Welcome to the some other podcast.

Lisa Lyons:        Thank you. It’s great to be here.

John Dowdy:     Well we’re excited to have you. A couple of weeks ago you sent me some before and after pictures of your horse’s hoof that was severely foundered. And the pictures are quite shocking. We’ve been running this as an ad for the last couple of weeks and it’s got a lot of activity. And let’s just talk about this particular horse, how long you’ve had him and how did you learn about the Equinety and what were your thoughts when you first got the Equinety?

Lisa Lyons:        Okay, well Calvin is a 10 year old, 17 hand, national show horse. I’ve had him for two and a half years. He was purchased as a project horse. He was underweight, under muscled, didn’t have the greatest feet, but had a heart and soul. So got him, got him into training, was given a sample of your product at a horse show. And like so many samples, threw it in my bag, didn’t think too much of it at the time.

Lisa Lyons:        When I got home I decided to read the back of it, do a little research, was impressed with the ingredients, the testimonials seemed good. It’s not a banned substance. I can give it to my horses that go to USCF shows, not worry about any drug testing problems. And right off the bat I noticed with Calvin he seemed more focused, more calm, better attitude, better focus. And as an added bonus he was in training, was getting good nutrition and good farrier care. But he started developing a much better top line, better muscle quality and unbeknownst to me, it was helping him grow his soles. He didn’t have the greatest feet and had some corrective shoeing done.

Lisa Lyons:        And anyway, flash forward to previous May, he’d been doing great and then came down with a severe case of mechanical founder. It happened very quickly. One day he was fine, next day I got the call and it was a touch and go for a while. He had to be hospitalized twice. A lot of radiograph, a lot of vet care, change of diet during his vet care. He was hooked up to IVs because everything got so inflamed. And one thing my vet commented on during all the radiographs was that he had a good amount of sole which probably saved his life. Because when he rotated the coffin bone it didn’t drop down due to the sickness of his soles.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, so just to reiterate, so you had him for two and a half years. After about six months of owning him is when you started him on the Equinety and that’s where you really noticed the muscle quality, the attitude focus, and a little did you know it was also helping with the sole depth, which is obviously came in handy for this mechanical founder. Now for those that are tuning in and have never heard of mechanical founder, could you tell us exactly what that is?

Lisa Lyons:        Sure. I mean, in my layman’s terms, I’m not a vet. Most founder is caused by something metabolic and in some other instance, Cushing’s, are highly susceptible to laminatic issues and with mechanical founder due to confirmation. And his confirmation is very straight up and down. And that’s how it was explained to me by the vet.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. And I find that… Well I would say what I want to say is, I find this interesting because it’s the first story that I’ve heard of where, you had started the horse on the Equinety product and he was on it for a year and a half. And then this happened where, well, it would have been life ending for him if it wouldn’t have been the sole depth.

Lisa Lyons:        Absolutely.

John Dowdy:     And here’s the one thing that we tried to get across to people and a lot of these podcast are for educational purposes, so we can try to help educate people on the benefits of amino acids and ours specifically, there’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches. But the thing that’s so unique about it is that they’re specifically formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body.

John Dowdy:     And that’s what releases the necessary hormones, which help heal at a cellular level. Now with all that being said, it’s not a miracle supplement. It’s not one of these things that is going to cure anything. What we try to get across is when you use this product in conjunction with what you’re already doing, the best things for your horse, and in your case you’re feeding him really great feed and giving him great care, he’s got a great vets and farriers. So they’re getting the best of everything and you just added this to it and added the Equinety to his daily regime. These are the things that you started noticing.

John Dowdy:     But a year and a half, so now he comes down and with this founder. Now when this podcast is published below the podcast on our website, I’ll have all this transcribed, but I’m going to put the pictures of bottom of this hoof so people can see. Which is just startling how quickly the recovery was.

John Dowdy:     So let’s get back into… He comes down with this mechanical founder, he’s really kind of on death stories, IVs and all this stuff. So what was the future of this horse really as it was sitting at this point? What was the doctor or the vet saying?

Lisa Lyons:        Well, we had a couple talks. I was worried if he was going to be suffering longterm, obviously, no horse center wants to put their horse through that. I asked her if she thought he could recover. She said yes. Asked her what the recovery time was. She said probably a year until he was sound and that he’d probably would never be ridden again. If so maybe lightly, at a walk, maybe an easy trail ride, but that he would never be able to be under workload again. And that was in August? And that was in August. And then in September he developed a pretty good size abscess and the radiographs showed it was a couple centimeters away from the coffin bone.

Lisa Lyons:        And with the help of my vet, the farrier and vet were able to drain it, pack it, clean it. That was end of September and 12 weeks later, that’s the two pictures at the 12 week span. The hoof had, I’d say, 85% healed the sole of his hoof, had healed.

John Dowdy:     Holy smokes.

Lisa Lyons:        Blowing everybody away and the amount of grow out of healthy hoofs has been phenomenal. And I’m happy to report that in the last five weeks he has been back to lunging, [inaudible 00:08:13] freely, no pain, totally sound, happy as a clam.

John Dowdy:     Oh my gosh.

Lisa Lyons:        Everybody’s excited. And now the vet and trainer is saying, “Well maybe, he could be a show horse again.” If he’s not, that’s okay. And I’m just happy that he’s sound and healthy.

John Dowdy:     Wow. Well I tell you it cracks me up and sometimes I have to hold myself back because, we run a lot of advertising on Facebook and the before and after picture that you sent me, it’s doing very well with all the interactions and things. But it always cracks me up when you have the comments that are thrown in there that, “Oh well it’s… Look at that horrible hoof trim or look at… Or it’s cut to this.” You know, they always have their opinion. Have you ever-

Lisa Lyons:        I know I’ve kind of laugh. It’s like, would you like to see my $10,000 vet bills?

John Dowdy:     Oh I know.

Lisa Lyons:        Everything that’s been done has been under veterinary care and we even fly in a specialized farrier from Oregon that has experience with foundered horses working hand in hand with my vet, my trainers on board and nutrition and body workers. And it’s like, really we’re not hacking into his hoof because we don’t know what we’re doing.

John Dowdy:     Yes.

Lisa Lyons:        It’s dead infected hoof.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Yeah. Well I guess with social media, anybody can have their three seconds of fame by typing in whatever in there.

Lisa Lyons:        Absolutely.

John Dowdy:     Well-

Lisa Lyons:        Yeah, there’s always going to be naysayer.

John Dowdy:     Yeah.

Lisa Lyons:        It’s a free world. Think what you want. I just know I’m looking at a horse that’s happy and cantering and in great condition right now.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. And I think the important takeaway with this is, in this particular situation, you definitely spent thousands of dollars and you have the best care and when you add this product to whatever’s going on with your horse, it helps speed up the, in this case, the recovery. Helped everything speed up. But if we go back and we’ve kind of already-

Lisa Lyons:        Absolutely.

John Dowdy:     And we’ve kind of already mentioned this, but fortunately because he had already been on product for a year and a half, the sole depth was at such, at his savings grace really because that would’ve just been disastrous.

Lisa Lyons:        That was crucial. Yeah. And something else, he’d been on it for awhile and do the severity of his founder he was confined to a stall for five months. A heavily padded stall either at the hospital or at our barn. And he was so calm and so good and my vet commented that he was the best patient ever. She said quite often after a month, horses have to be sedated. They just start losing it after being stall rest for long periods of time. And he was just, he was a happy boy.

Lisa Lyons:        No, no, he was calm. He was good. He just was, he was totally chill.

John Dowdy:     Oh that’s fantastic. Well…

Lisa Lyons:        Yeah, I mean he did his part. I mean everybody did their part. The vet did her part. Farrier did his part, trainer did her part, the product, the Equinety did his part, and Calvin did his part. He wasn’t kicking, he wasn’t making things worse.

John Dowdy:     Sure. Yep. All right, Lisa, I also understand that you’ve been giving the Equinety to your hot headed redhead mayor that also has Cushing’s. So how long have you been given the product to her and what benefits have you seen since you’ve been giving it to her?

Lisa Lyons:        Same amount of time. Given that sample at the horse show a couple of years ago and she is a 20 year old national show horse mayor, diagnosed with Cushing’s about three years ago. We noticed she just was getting really furry and not shutting out. And she’s a picky eater. She’ll take it no problem. And, thankfully with her, she has never had any laminetic issues, which is one of the downfalls of Cushing’s. She’s 20 years old, she’s in great shape. People are blown away when they find out she’s 20. She’s probably more game than my 10 year old gelding and great body tone, great attitude. And the nice thing about the product is the cost. And so many supplements out there are so expensive and it works out to a dollar a day per horse, that’s less than a cup of coffee. So, definitely doable.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Yeah. Were you surprised at the… When you opened that little lid and looked at the scoop, what was your reaction about the scoop size?

Lisa Lyons:        I couldn’t believe it. It’s tiny. It looked like something you’d give a small kid.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. So for those of tuning in, the serving size, if you’ve never tried the product, it’s 5.2 grams. So it’s just shy of a tablespoon and it doesn’t matter the size of the animal because we’re targeting the pituitary gland, which is the size of a pea roughly. And in mammals, whether it be a dog or a horse. So yeah, we have a lot of people that, big horses or big draft horses or if they’ve got a little mini they’re like, “Oh do I just give half?” Nope. You give the same serving size to all of them. So. Awesome.

Lisa Lyons:        Yep.

John Dowdy:     Great. Yeah. So I think for the people that are tuning in for the first time and wondering if this product is really for their horse, in your case you were just given a sample way back when and it really helped with his demeanor, focus, stamina, help build muscle.

John Dowdy:     He was a show horse. So you’re needing all those components and then used, I guess it would be safe to say, almost at that point as a preventative, not knowing that that’s what it was going to be with helping the sole depth. Because that’s what really saved him in that aspect. But if there’s anybody that’s tuning in, just learning about this product for the first time, that might be a little skeptical because here’s a product that claims to do all this stuff or at least people are saying that it does all this stuff. What advice would you have for them or anything that you’d have to say to maybe to get them to try the product for themselves?

Lisa Lyons:        Well, I would say try it. There’s nothing harmful in there. There’s no fillers, there’s no additives. Read the ingredients if you’re not sure, give it a try. What have you got to lose? I’m so grateful that I was given that sample because I honestly didn’t know about it and I saw the results and the first thing I noticed was his demeanor. He was calmer, he was more focused and then I noticed everything else happening. And then the happy accident was unbeknownst to me, it was creating thicker soles, which saved my horse’s life.

John Dowdy:     Yep. That’s right.

Lisa Lyons:        Yep.

John Dowdy:     Well that is great. I know there’s people going to benefit from hearing your story there and glad that he’s doing awesome and we’d love to have an updated podcast maybe in six months or so and see how he’s doing at that point.

Lisa Lyons:        Yeah, absolutely. Our goal is, he’s… The last six weeks has been doing groundwork, getting out every day, getting lunged, long lined and the goal is after the new year, get on him and start lightly riding him again.

John Dowdy:     Wow. Well, that’s a long ways from the first prognosis.

Lisa Lyons:        Yeah. I mean, that’s a way long ways away when he’s getting carted off to the hospital.

John Dowdy:     Right. Wow. Well, Lisa, I really appreciate you taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast. Lisa Lyons out of California. Thank you so much.

Lisa Lyons:        Thank you. My pleasure. Thank you for a great product.

John Dowdy:     Oh, thank you. All right. Bye. Bye.

 

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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  -   Lisa Lyons - Sole Depth - Underweight – More Focus – Better Attitude – More Topline – Muscle Quality – Cushings   - John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing out to the West Coast of Californ...  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> Lisa Lyons - Sole Depth - Underweight – More Focus –<br /> Better Attitude – More Topline – Muscle Quality – Cushings<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing out to the West Coast of California. That's West Coast for me because I'm in Florida. Lisa Lyons out of California. Welcome to the some other podcast.<br /> <br /> Lisa Lyons:        Thank you. It's great to be here.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Well we're excited to have you. A couple of weeks ago you sent me some before and after pictures of your horse's hoof that was severely foundered. And the pictures are quite shocking. We've been running this as an ad for the last couple of weeks and it's got a lot of activity. And let's just talk about this particular horse, how long you've had him and how did you learn about the Equinety and what were your thoughts when you first got the Equinety?<br /> <br /> Lisa Lyons:        Okay, well Calvin is a 10 year old, 17 hand, national show horse. I've had him for two and a half years. He was purchased as a project horse. He was underweight, under muscled, didn't have the greatest feet, but had a heart and soul. So got him, got him into training, was given a sample of your product at a horse show. And like so many samples, threw it in my bag, didn't think too much of it at the time.<br /> <br /> Lisa Lyons:        When I got home I decided to read the back of it, do a little research, was impressed with the ingredients, the testimonials seemed good. It's not a banned substance. I can give it to my horses that go to USCF shows, not worry about any drug testing problems. And right off the bat I noticed with Calvin he seemed more focused, more calm, better attitude, better focus. And as an added bonus he was in training, was getting good nutrition and good farrier care. But he started developing a much better top line, better muscle quality and unbeknownst to me, it was helping him grow his soles. He didn't have the greatest feet and had some corrective shoeing done.<br /> <br /> Lisa Lyons:        And anyway, flash forward to previous May, he'd been doing great and then came down with a severe case of mechanical founder. It happened very quickly. One day he was fine, next day I got the call and it was a touch and go for a while. He had to be hospitalized twice. A lot of radiograph, a lot of vet care, change of diet during his vet care. He was hooked up to IVs because everything got so inflamed. And one thing my vet commented on during all the radiographs was that he had a good amount of sole which probably saved his life. Because when he rotated the coffin bone it didn't drop down due to the sickness of his soles.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Yeah, so just to reiterate, so you had him for two and a half years. After about six months of owning him is when you started him on the Equinety and that's where you really noticed the muscle quality, the attitude focus, and a little did you know it was also helping with the sole depth, which is obviously came in handy for this mechanical founder. Now for those that are tuning in and have never heard of mechanical founder, could you tell us exactly what that is?<br /> <br /> Lisa Lyons:        Sure. I mean, in my layman's terms, I'm not a vet. Most founder is caused by something metabolic and in some other instance, Cushing's, are highly susceptible to laminatic issues and with mechanical founder due to confirmation. And his confirmation is very straight up and down. And that's how it was explained to me by the vet.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Yeah. And I find that... Well I would say what I want to say is, I find this interesting because it's the first story that I've heard of where, you had started the horse on the Equinety product and he was on it for a year and a half. And then this happened where, well, it would have been life ending for him if it wouldn't ha... John Dowdy clean 16:07
047 – Sara Turner – BIG Skeptic – Performance Horses – Chronic Pain – Fox Hunting – More Stamina – Responsive – Less Stressed https://www.teamequinety.com/047-sara-turner-big-skeptic-performance-horses-chronic-pain-fox-hunting-more-stamina-responsive-less-stressed/ Wed, 22 Jan 2020 14:00:14 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1848     Sara Turner - BIG Skeptic – Performance Horses – Chronic Pain Fox Hunting – More Stamina – Responsive – Less Stressed   John Dowdy:                 Hello, and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Virginia. We've got Sara Turner on, and we're going to talk about fox hunting, although I was corrected just a bit into fox chasing, but we'll get into that. So the difference, what is this sport? And it sounds like a lot of fun. I've never personally done it, but after speaking with Sara, I think I'm sold. So without further ado, Sara Turner, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Sara Turner:                  Hi, thank you for having me. John Dowdy:                 Well, it's great to have you and I'm excited for this one because I don't believe that we've had anybody in this fox hunting, fox chasing niche on the Equinety podcast. So let's talk about this sport that you do. How far back does it go, and tell us a little bit about the adventures. Sara Turner:                  Sure. I'm excited to talk about it and share my experiences with Equinety and with my two Thoroughbreds, who I actively hunt. So I'm located between Charlottesville and Richmond in Virginia, and I'm lucky enough that I live in what I consider the epicenter of fox hunting in the country. There are recognized hunts all over the U.S., and when I say recognize, that means they're recognized by the Masters of Foxhounds Association, which is actually located two hours north of me in Middleburg, Virginia. It's a deep, deep, traditional, long part of the Virginia culture. And it's a wonderful, wonderful sport. If you enjoy horses and we call them hounds, we don't say dogs. Dogs, the countryside, an adrenaline rush, then it just work for you. Unlike most other equestrian sports, there's not a ribbon at the end of the day. And I'm just fine with that. There's a big smile on your face and everyone's high fiving that you survived the day. Sara Turner:                  We are out there to have fun, enjoy the countryside, enjoy our horses and enjoy watching the hounds work. So that's the sport. And the hunts that I hunt with, there'll be a scheduled hunt three days a week. So unlike horse showing, which I did in my past life, if you have a bad show, you walk away, wasn't great. I chipped that jump and you know it, I just spent the whole weekend and the whole week preparing for it. If you have a bad hunt or something goes wrong, guess what? You wake up two days later, you'd go back out and you'd try it again. And everyone's there. And it's a very deep rooted community in the fox hunting world. Very supportive. You know, just people want to have fun and want everybody to be safe. So I'm happy to tell you a little bit how a typical hunt would work if you want me to [crosstalk 00:02:47]. John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. Well, we've come this far. We can't stop now. Sara Turner:                  Okay, each club has staff and we have a huntsman who manages and takes care of our hounds. Each club will have, I don't know, somewhere between maybe 80 and 120 hounds that they feed and care for. And our hounds are our pride and joy and so much goes into their breeding and their care. So we'll show up at what we call a fixture. It's pre scheduled, a time and a place and usually in the middle of a cow field somewhere or at someone's beautiful estate in central Virginia. You park your trailer and the hound truck will arrive with usually 30 hounds and the staff horses all crammed into a trailer. And the members of the hunt show up. We finish tacking up, we get on our proper attire and there'll be maybe a quick, what they call a stirrup cup in the beginning, if someone's hosting the hunt. They'll be walking around with cups of port and maybe some donuts on a silver platter. That's on a more, you know, bigger, organized day. During the week, it's not quite the fanfare. Sara Turner:                  The masters of the hun...

 

 

Sara Turner – BIG Skeptic – Performance Horses – Chronic Pain
Fox Hunting – More Stamina – Responsive – Less Stressed

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello, and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We’re going to swing up into Virginia. We’ve got Sara Turner on, and we’re going to talk about fox hunting, although I was corrected just a bit into fox chasing, but we’ll get into that. So the difference, what is this sport? And it sounds like a lot of fun. I’ve never personally done it, but after speaking with Sara, I think I’m sold. So without further ado, Sara Turner, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Sara Turner:                  Hi, thank you for having me.

John Dowdy:                 Well, it’s great to have you and I’m excited for this one because I don’t believe that we’ve had anybody in this fox hunting, fox chasing niche on the Equinety podcast. So let’s talk about this sport that you do. How far back does it go, and tell us a little bit about the adventures.

Sara Turner:                  Sure. I’m excited to talk about it and share my experiences with Equinety and with my two Thoroughbreds, who I actively hunt. So I’m located between Charlottesville and Richmond in Virginia, and I’m lucky enough that I live in what I consider the epicenter of fox hunting in the country. There are recognized hunts all over the U.S., and when I say recognize, that means they’re recognized by the Masters of Foxhounds Association, which is actually located two hours north of me in Middleburg, Virginia. It’s a deep, deep, traditional, long part of the Virginia culture. And it’s a wonderful, wonderful sport. If you enjoy horses and we call them hounds, we don’t say dogs. Dogs, the countryside, an adrenaline rush, then it just work for you. Unlike most other equestrian sports, there’s not a ribbon at the end of the day. And I’m just fine with that. There’s a big smile on your face and everyone’s high fiving that you survived the day.

Sara Turner:                  We are out there to have fun, enjoy the countryside, enjoy our horses and enjoy watching the hounds work. So that’s the sport. And the hunts that I hunt with, there’ll be a scheduled hunt three days a week. So unlike horse showing, which I did in my past life, if you have a bad show, you walk away, wasn’t great. I chipped that jump and you know it, I just spent the whole weekend and the whole week preparing for it. If you have a bad hunt or something goes wrong, guess what? You wake up two days later, you’d go back out and you’d try it again. And everyone’s there. And it’s a very deep rooted community in the fox hunting world. Very supportive. You know, just people want to have fun and want everybody to be safe. So I’m happy to tell you a little bit how a typical hunt would work if you want me to [crosstalk 00:02:47].

John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. Well, we’ve come this far. We can’t stop now.

Sara Turner:                  Okay, each club has staff and we have a huntsman who manages and takes care of our hounds. Each club will have, I don’t know, somewhere between maybe 80 and 120 hounds that they feed and care for. And our hounds are our pride and joy and so much goes into their breeding and their care. So we’ll show up at what we call a fixture. It’s pre scheduled, a time and a place and usually in the middle of a cow field somewhere or at someone’s beautiful estate in central Virginia. You park your trailer and the hound truck will arrive with usually 30 hounds and the staff horses all crammed into a trailer. And the members of the hunt show up. We finish tacking up, we get on our proper attire and there’ll be maybe a quick, what they call a stirrup cup in the beginning, if someone’s hosting the hunt. They’ll be walking around with cups of port and maybe some donuts on a silver platter. That’s on a more, you know, bigger, organized day. During the week, it’s not quite the fanfare.

Sara Turner:                  The masters of the hunt will make any necessary announcements and the group will be divided into three groups. First flight, second flight, third flight. In your first flight group, we ride up with the hounds, we keep up with the huntsman. We gallop, we jump, we go, we do whatever’s necessary to keep up with the hounds and the huntsman. Second flight will do the same as first flight, but they typically go around the jump. And then third flight is more of, they call them hilltoppers. They are out to enjoy the scenery. They just want to enjoy the countryside and they stay at a walk and trot.

Sara Turner:                  So there’s a little bit of everything depending on your riding ability and your horse’s ability or what you’re comfortable with. Like I said, we’ll hunt with 30 hounds. A hunt can last typically anywhere from three to five hours. And you just never know what the day’s going to bring. You could be walking for three hours and the hounds, if the scent is just not good that day. And there’s always off the theories as to why everyone’s, you know, rumbling and say, “Oh, it’s too wet or it’s too dry.” You could hit a line within five minutes to casting in the hounds and be on a two hour gallop.

Sara Turner:                  And when I say it’s not just a gallop on pristine, beautiful footing. We are going down gravel roads. We’re going through mud, we’re going on hard surfaces. My farrier always jokes because he’s shoes a lot of adventures. And he says, “I’ll put some stud holes in there and you can figure out what studs you want for the day depending.”, I said, “Well I’m sorry but I can’t predict if I’m going to be on roads or mud.”, you know, it would be in everything.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, right.

Sara Turner:                  So our horse has to be very alert, very keen, very athletic. You know, they’re special. It’s hard to find a good hunt horse because you could gallop up a hill, blast up a hill and through the woods and through really trappy creek crossings and then stand at what we call a check. And that’s where the huntsman is calling the hounds in and he’s counting them very quickly. He’s deciding where he’s going to redirect them. Well that’s hard for a horse after a big adrenaline rush like that. Then they’re supposed to stand and be perfect, but that’s what we expect our horses to do. I had a girlfriend came and hunted her first time. She’s a horse show rider. She said, “I can’t believe how close the proximity these horses are.”

Sara Turner:                  Sometimes we’re packed in like sardines on a trail or there’s a tight reverse field and you know, the hounds and huntsman’s laughing past you and you’re brushing your stirrup irons. That’s how close it is. But your horse has to stand like a statue. So it’s asking a lot of our equine partners to be a solid hunt horse. So they’ve got to have stamina, athleticism, a good brain, know where their feet are and be ready to go on a moment’s notice and you know, be fine with the hounds running in and out of their feet, be fine with other horses in and around them. So it’s fun. To me, it’s the closest thing to heaven. I mean it’s an amazing sport and on a good day, you’re just coming back on the highest of highs and something you can’t explain to anybody else. It’s a lot of fun. So I think that explains a little bit of what it is and-

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Wow. Absolutely. Yeah. Now, how far back does this a tradition of hunting go, fox hunting?

Sara Turner:                  Well, it started in England and in Ireland, hundreds of years ago. And it was brought to the U.S., actually George Washington had his own pack of hounds who he actively hunted. So it’s been going on in the U.S. for several hundred years. And the hunt that I actively hunt with, we just celebrated our 129th year as a recognized hunt. So it’s a very like deep rooted in the countryside in the culture here of Virginia. I’ve been known to run into my children’s school in full hunting attire to pick someone up early with my horse hitched to the back of my truck. And the principal of the school says, “Oh, is it a good hunt today?” Yeah. It’s very much part of the lifestyle here, and it’s a great way to live and a great way to raise your kids.

John Dowdy:                 I’m just curious of how many people that are tuning in are now getting out of their discipline to go into this sport. That would be interesting to know. I don’t know if we’ll ever find that number but.

Sara Turner:                  I don’t know. Who knows? Or at least try it. It doesn’t hurt if you find a local hunt and you know, get to know some people who have maybe have a hunt horse, they’ll lease you for a day and it’s worth trying.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Wow, that’s great. Now, so this is interesting because you have high performance horses that you’re asking a lot out of. And how in the world did we end up here on the Equinety podcast with you using the Equinety product? So give us your, maybe how skeptical you were or your thoughts on supplements in general. How did all that come to be?

Sara Turner:                  Sure, absolutely. I’ve had a good friend of mine who I hunt with. She brought the Equinety product to my attention and I sort of brushed it off because I am a skeptic of most supplements. I’m a big believer in good forage, good feed, good turnout, proper saddle fit, and your horse will perform at their best if you just give them the basic that they need. I’ll do a supplement if it’s been researched or has clinical research behind it. I’m not anti supplement. And I always joke, I think, I won’t say any companies, but if these supplements work, we all have perfect horses. We would never lose a shoe. We would have very calm horses. You know, we’d have the best feet and the best brain. And so I’m skeptical, but I do feed my horses supplements. I’m happy to tell you what I feed them and what I think has benefited them.

Sara Turner:                  But I think at the end of the day, what they need is good turnout in a herd with good farrier work, good feed, good hay. And that’s everything I provide for my horses. And I also do regular chiropractic and acupuncture with a local vet. It’s very important for these hunt horses. During the season, if you’re hunting hard, their bodies change, their backs change, have your saddle checked, have them get their monthly massage. I probably overdo it than most people, but you know, I’m a big believer, you know, the basics, the fundamentals I guess. So my friend, she got in contact with you through a network of not sure, just talking to different people and she actually spoke to you on the phone. She hunts. She has an 18 year old Irish sport horse, quarter horse, Thoroughbred cross.

Sara Turner:                  She’s been hunting first flight for 11 years now, knows that horse inside out. So she tried it. The horses been on it for about four or five days. We went on a hunt near Charlottesville, was a good hunt. We chased several red fox and there are a lot of big coops that day and she said, “My horse never ran out of steam.” She said he felt light on his feet. She said there’s something going on. So from listening to her and running it by my vet who my vet looked at the container and said, “Well, it’s not going to hurt anything.” And listening to several of the podcasts where people had said, “I could see benefits within five days.” I said, “Okay, it’s not that expensive. My vet has said it’s not going to hurt anything.”

Sara Turner:                  My friend is pushing me to try this, try this. Fine, I’ll try the 15 day trial, thinking, “But my horses are doing everything I’m asking them to do and they’re doing it well so I don’t expect to see any results.” So that’s how I got to the point where I said, “Okay, let’s give it a go and see.” So I currently have two Thoroughbreds. One is a six year old. I pulled him off the track as a four year old and I started hunting him last season. And this is the horse I want to speak to because this is the horse, I noticed immediate results. Pull him off the track, gave him time to decompress. I would take him on little trail rides in groups. Just slowly brought him into, okay, this is the life of a Virginia horse. You’re no longer at a track in Florida, and knew that he was going to have quirkiness or times where he’d be sore, he’s developing new muscles.

Sara Turner:                  But he took the fox hunting like a duck to water. He just seemed to love it right away. So he always been a very enjoyable horse to ride. He’s light in the bridle. He moves along with the group. He doesn’t act up when we’re casting off and there’s a big group of horses galloping off in front of him. He keeps his wits about him, but his whole, is that he hates to be groomed. We jokingly call him land shark on the ground. Behavior wise, he’s great in turnout. He finishes his feed. I treated him for ulcers when I first got him. I did the 28 day a gastro guard. Again, he gets regular chiropractic care, regular vet care, regular saddle fittings. I’ve tried everything with him. I tried being nice.

Sara Turner:                  I tried being mean, but the grooming, I finally just said, “You know what, this is who he is and I just have to groom him and get this over with and get the saddle on.” As soon as I sit my tush in the saddle, he’s a dream horse to ride. He’s done everything I’ve asked him to do, I’ve taken him to little local hunter shows, I take him to a weekly lesson. He jumps around the courses, he swaps his leads. So I just finally said this is who he is and just going to have to deal with it. And tried him on the Equinety and I can say, it was day three, I pulled him out of his stall to get ready to take him to a lesson because I’m just introducing him to jumping. And I put him in the cross ties, he didn’t try to bite my wrist. He wasn’t snapping turtle at me.

Sara Turner:                  His body looked more relaxed and I said, “Okay, the sun’s out. It’s a nice day. Maybe you’re just happier today.” I groomed him and what I’ve told my friends is that the body language was still there. The intensity was down. So yes, he was still making it known to me that I don’t like to be groomed, pinning his ears and kind of giving me a dirty look. But his body just wasn’t as intense or fidgety and he wasn’t snapping up the cross ties. So I continued to groom him. Well, sorry, fox hunters, we tack up before we load on the trailer. So I put a saddle on. I loaded him on the trailer. As I’m raising my ramp, I hear him go. Now that is not something he normally does.

Sara Turner:                  This is a young Thoroughbred, acting like a young thoroughbred when you load him on the trailer with sort of the bug eyed look like, “Oh, where are we going now? What are you doing now? Where are you driving me now?”, but he’s always behaved. It’s just he looks Thoroughbredy when you put him on the trailer. Go around, do my safety check, come back to his door. I said, “Okay, put your head in.” Close the door. As I’m closing the door, he puts his head down and he just went, he’s never done that. So that to me was, there was a level of anxiety that had been removed from him. Took him to the lesson-

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. And this was in three days.

Sara Turner:                  This was on day three. This is day three of giving him the supplement, yes. Took him to the lesson, he performed like he always does. He’s actually always very good, does everything we ask him to do. There’s very little fuss, put him on the trailer and leave. I don’t think anything of it day. I guess it would have been day six or seven into the Equinety with my first hunt with him. So it was a fast hunt. We actually end up chasing a coyote. It was a fast rip roaring hunt. This is a horse despite his age and despite his breeding, and I’ve always thought this would come with time because fox hunting requires a lot of mental and physical stamina, and I think they develop that over three or four seasons of hunting. This is the horse that you typically, within an hour and a half, two hours of the hunt, he would start to what I say poop out.

Sara Turner:                  Whereas if we’re galloping up a hill, I have to wear spurs and say, “Come on, you can get it. You can get up. Come on, keep going.”, because I would always say to him, “I like to hunt and when we hunt, we’re going to stay out for the hounds come in. So you know, we’re not going in just because you’re pooping out. You’re going to keep going. You’re going to get stronger and fitter and we can do this.” I never felt him hit that wall of fatigue on that hunt and we covered some ground that day. A lot of times as they start to get tired, you’ll feel them start to trip over little things easier like a stick or a log or a rock. They just sort of not paying attention. He never hit that moment. He had a consistent level of energy that just sort of maintained at that level the entire hunt. And one of the things I was very, very leery of with trying the Equinety is having Thoroughbreds and knowing that little changes in their diet or their routine can make them hot. They’re very sensitive horses.

Sara Turner:                  I said when I kept reading on the website that your horse will have more stamina. I said, “I don’t need more stamina. I ride Thoroughbreds. They got plenty of get up and go.” I was very leery that it was going to make my guys hot. It has not done that. It’s maintained and channeled their focus. I was on that hunt on day six or seven of the Equinety. He was responsive to my aid like I’ve never felt him before where I had to do minimal, I mean just a pinch of the rein and he was on it. He was listening to me and I’m talking, this is two hours into the hunt and he was still this way. I felt like I was riding a season hunt horse that had been hunting for six, seven years. I was riding the horse that I thought I was hoping he would be in six or seven years, if that makes sense.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, that’s incredible. Wow.

Sara Turner:                  I was so confident on him and I haven’t ridden him first flight yet because like I said, we’d been easing up to that point. It sort of comes, first, he had to learn how to hunt. Now we’re learning how to jump and then we’ll apply the two together because it’s not just cantering up to a jump and jumping it. It’s cantering up to a jump that may have mud and rocks or a drop on the other side or a hound jumps out and you have to pull them off the jump. So I felt so confident that day and I knew the territory that I knew if we came on up on jump, I knew what type of jumps they were going to be, that I moved him up to first flight.

Sara Turner:                  And I said to my friend who had convinced me to try the product, I looked at her and I said, “I don’t know what I’m sitting on, but this is amazing.” He feels amazing. We were on a gallop at one point and he put his head down and started doing, I would called the happy blow, on a full gallop, on a loose rein. Feels like loose and happy through his body and his back so.

John Dowdy:                 Wow. Well I think it would be important now, for those that are tuning in for the first time and you’ve been listening to this podcast from the beginning, what is it and how does it work? Now by the way, before I get into that, were you surprised at the dose? It’s 5.2 grams, which is not quite a tablespoon. Did that surprise you at all? That it was just-

Sara Turner:                  Absolutely. The fact that I didn’t have to do a loading dose was one of the things that I figured, okay, this was worth trying. And yes, the dose is so small and I always test it on my horses out. I’ll mix it with a little seeing your feed because they love seeing your feed, and they gobbled it right up. Neither of them had a problem eating it and they’ve never had any, you know?

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Sara Turner:                  Yeah. It’s very easy to administer and give. And I said it’s not one of these things where you have to do a three week loading dose or taper off and you know. It’s just super easy to start giving to him.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, yeah, absolutely. So for those tuning in for the first time, the Equinety Horse XL, it’s 100% pure amino acids. There’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches. And as you just mentioned, Sara, there’s no loading dose. So one little scoop every day. And the amino acids are specifically formulated in this combination to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body. And that’s what releases the necessary hormones, which help heal the body at a cellular level. So as you were describing, when we get into the beginning of this podcast, you are skeptical, one, just kind of in general about supplements just because you’ve been around for a while. You’ve been disappointed probably more than a few times like a lot of people out there. We’re blessed in the fact that this product, it does work and at the same time with yours, I mean they’re in tip top shape, great condition.

John Dowdy:                 They do everything that you need them to do. And yeah, with a couple of corks, but all horses have that kind of stuff. So the reason why this product helps in so many situations, and now we’re talking high performance horses that you’re asking a lot out of, probably the best way to describe what’s going on is it’s given the horse what it needs to help balance itself from a hormonal level. So you’re right in the aspect, we get a lot of questions, “Hey, is this going to make my horse hot?” Well, there’s nothing in this product that makes a horse hot. It just helps balance the horse. So typically a horse that is hot, it will tend to back them off or calm them down a little bit. And when it’s more on the calm and lazy side, kind of peps them up a little bit so it balances the horse.

Sara Turner:                  And that’s where I was so skeptical. I said, “How can something make one horse sort of calm and more focused, and give another horse and the little bit of extra boost of energy.” I was very scary of that and I stuck, so I knew my boys and I said well, if it’s going to make them hot, I think I’m going to know right away. I’m going to know right away. And if it was going to make anybody hot, it would make my two hot. They’re very ready to go. They love their job and it’s done the opposite so.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. And we’ve had several podcasts, we always had people talk about four or five, six, seven different horses that all have completely different issues going on. And all they did was add Equinety Horse XL to it. And again, because we’re giving the horse what it needs to release its own hormones, the body knows exactly where to send those hormones for the healing. And with yours, not to mention the fact that he hated being groomed and brushed, and you know. And so what’s causing that? Could it be chronic pain going on in there? Could it be some ulcer stuff happening? Is it the stress, that you know, who knows what? But so many times we hear that adding this little scoop just seems to be the key missing component that they’d been looking for all along so.

Sara Turner:                  Right. And I’ve explored all those options with the grooming because I really hated seeing him just be so hateful towards grooming because I don’t think horses love to be groomed. I think that some just tolerate it better, but it is kind of a nice moment that you have with your horse before you ride them. And it was one of those things I just had to sort of get through it and get on, get clear my mind because it was such an unhappy, unpleasant event. It’s always been an unpleasant event. It’s one of those things, you can’t let your brain go to a negative place right before you get on and ride your horse. It’s true. And I think I told you this when we were talking back and forth online, I said it’s almost like, well, let me rewind.

Sara Turner:                  I’ve explored all the physical issues that could cause him to hate being groomed. I’ve done the ulcer treatment. He gets all the tummy stuff. Nothing has changed through any of that. The behavior stayed the same. And my vet have said if this behavior carried over into you riding him, then we would explore some tummy issues, if he was showing clinical signs of ulcers. Absolutely. The acupuncturists, you know, they do the acupuncture points but I don’t see anything that’s pointing to digestive issues. So I just finally said something must have happened at the track. Maybe he started a bad behavior and the grooms there just came at him with negativity, negativity, and it just got balled up in him emotionally.

Sara Turner:                  I know this sounds kind of woo woo, but now that he’s on the Equinety, it’s like there was a tight emotional knot in him that I could not figure out as his owner how to unravel. The Equinety has unraveled the knot and he takes a breath now. He takes a breath and it’s amazing. I told my friend who turned me on to the product, I said, “If the Equinety only helps the grooming, it’s worth a dollar a day for the product.”, you know. If it helps him not be so stressed, the fact that he’s getting groomed, then it’s worth it. But it’s also helping him in his job as well so.

John Dowdy:                 No, that’s great. And I’ll tell you, we have heard a lot, especially over in the barrel racing world, a lot of the horses that are super stressed, have high anxiety, spooky. We have heard a lot of complete demeanor changes by the third day. So this just reiterates how quickly this product works. As a matter of fact, this product starts working in 24 hours. It stimulates the pituitary to release those hormones in 24 hours. So now it’s just a matter of how quickly you can begin seeing the changes. So for a horse that has stress, anxiety, that’s a bit spooky, you know, day three is very common. But I would say even the vast majority, and I’m talking high 90 percentile see changes in 30 days or less. Softer, shinier coat, feeling out, more muscle, demeanor, attitude, mood, focus.

John Dowdy:                 Even the hoof growth is a big one as well. Well that’s pretty awesome. Sara, I really appreciate you taking the time and I know that I’m excited for this one to get this one out because it’s our first one around fox hunting. I wish I could take a poll on how many people would pick this sport up now. That would be interesting.

Sara Turner:                  I love [inaudible 00:27:22].

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, absolutely so.

Sara Turner:                  It’s a great sport.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, that’s great. So Sara Turner, out of Virginia, thank you so much for taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast.

Sara Turner:                  Thank you. I’m happy to.

John Dowdy:                 All right, thanks. Bye bye.

 

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  -   Sara Turner - BIG Skeptic – Performance Horses – Chronic Pain Fox Hunting – More Stamina – Responsive – Less Stressed   - John Dowdy:                 Hello, and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast.  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> Sara Turner - BIG Skeptic – Performance Horses – Chronic Pain<br /> Fox Hunting – More Stamina – Responsive – Less Stressed<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello, and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Virginia. We've got Sara Turner on, and we're going to talk about fox hunting, although I was corrected just a bit into fox chasing, but we'll get into that. So the difference, what is this sport? And it sounds like a lot of fun. I've never personally done it, but after speaking with Sara, I think I'm sold. So without further ado, Sara Turner, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Sara Turner:                  Hi, thank you for having me.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Well, it's great to have you and I'm excited for this one because I don't believe that we've had anybody in this fox hunting, fox chasing niche on the Equinety podcast. So let's talk about this sport that you do. How far back does it go, and tell us a little bit about the adventures.<br /> <br /> Sara Turner:                  Sure. I'm excited to talk about it and share my experiences with Equinety and with my two Thoroughbreds, who I actively hunt. So I'm located between Charlottesville and Richmond in Virginia, and I'm lucky enough that I live in what I consider the epicenter of fox hunting in the country. There are recognized hunts all over the U.S., and when I say recognize, that means they're recognized by the Masters of Foxhounds Association, which is actually located two hours north of me in Middleburg, Virginia. It's a deep, deep, traditional, long part of the Virginia culture. And it's a wonderful, wonderful sport. If you enjoy horses and we call them hounds, we don't say dogs. Dogs, the countryside, an adrenaline rush, then it just work for you. Unlike most other equestrian sports, there's not a ribbon at the end of the day. And I'm just fine with that. There's a big smile on your face and everyone's high fiving that you survived the day.<br /> <br /> Sara Turner:                  We are out there to have fun, enjoy the countryside, enjoy our horses and enjoy watching the hounds work. So that's the sport. And the hunts that I hunt with, there'll be a scheduled hunt three days a week. So unlike horse showing, which I did in my past life, if you have a bad show, you walk away, wasn't great. I chipped that jump and you know it, I just spent the whole weekend and the whole week preparing for it. If you have a bad hunt or something goes wrong, guess what? You wake up two days later, you'd go back out and you'd try it again. And everyone's there. And it's a very deep rooted community in the fox hunting world. Very supportive. You know, just people want to have fun and want everybody to be safe. So I'm happy to tell you a little bit how a typical hunt would work if you want me to [crosstalk 00:02:47].<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. Well, we've come this far. We can't stop now.<br /> <br /> Sara Turner:                  Okay, each club has staff and we have a huntsman who manages and takes care of our hounds. Each club will have, I don't know, somewhere between maybe 80 and 120 hounds that they feed and care for. And our hounds are our pride and joy and so much goes into their breeding and their care. So we'll show up at what we call a fixture. It's pre scheduled, a time and a place and usually in the middle of a cow field somewhere or at someone's beautiful estate in central Virginia. You park your trailer and the hound truck will arrive with usually 30 hounds and the staff horses all crammed into a trailer. And the members of the hunt show up. We finish tacking up, we get on our proper attire and there'll be maybe a quick, what they call a stirrup cup in the beginning, if someone's hosting the hunt. They'll be walking around with cups of port and maybe some donuts on a silver platter. That's on a more, John Dowdy clean 27:29
046 – Chris Roll – Founder – heaves – Near Death Mini now doing great! https://www.teamequinety.com/046-chris-roll-founder-heaves-near-death-mini-now-doing-great/ Wed, 15 Jan 2020 14:00:02 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1845   Chris Roll - Founder – heaves – Near Death Mini now doing great!   John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. This is a pretty, I'm just going to say, a miraculous one. I always tell people that the Equinety product is not a miracle supplement, but it sure does some miraculous things and I think this story fits right into that category. We're going to swing up into Pennsylvania. Chris Roll, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Chris Roll:         Thank you, John. It's good to be here. John Dowdy:     Well, we're happy to have you and I'm excited to talk about this one. I actually came across one of your comments in a post that on one of the ads that we were running on Facebook and you told the story of, you have too many ponies in their twenties and one of them was scheduled to be euthanized and then something quite miraculous happened but let's talk about this one in particular, what you were dealing with prior to finding the Equinety product. What was going on with this one? Chris Roll:         Okay. This was a mid-twenties miniature horse. She got down where she was stiff-jointed and all she wanted to do was lay down all the time and I thought maybe it was joint problems so I put her on a joint supplement and that didn't help. And the farrier came and he said that she was foundered so the owner decided we were going to have her euthanized before winter because she wasn't moving enough to keep her body heat up. I saw ads on Facebook for Equinety and I read the reviews and I said, "let me try this as one last resort for her, if it doesn't work then we'll have her euthanized." Within seven days, this miniature horse back up and it's been probably two months now or three that she's been on Equinety and she is now bucking and running and feisty as ever. John Dowdy:     Now, that's pretty darn amazing. And again, I got to put the asterisk on this. This is not a miracle supplement. I'm just going to throw that out there. But, let's go back to some of the stuff that you were dealing with. So, you thought it was a shoulder issue, you were working with a couple of different farriers and they were able to say, "hey, no, this horse is foundered," which this horse had been foundered before? Chris Roll:         Prior to us buying her, yes. She had been foundered before, but she was good up until the point where she had gotten down- John Dowdy:     Sure. Chris Roll:         ...with foot pain. John Dowdy:     Yeah. And then she was so bad that she just couldn't really get up, you were having to feed her while she was kind of- Chris Roll:         No, I fed her out of a feed pan on the ground because she wouldn't want to get up, I mean, she would just lay there and eat out of this pan. John Dowdy:     Mm-hmm (affirmative). Chris Roll:         And then I'd make her get up so that she can move around because it's not good for their digestion to lay and eat. So I would make her get up, but she would eat, she would get up and eat and then back down right away. John Dowdy:     Right. Just in a lot, a lot of pain. Yeah. Chris Roll:         Right. John Dowdy:     So- Chris Roll:         Like I said, I tried joint supplements and I tried Bute and nothing seemed to help her. And then like I said, I read the Equinety reviews and I thought, "why not?" So I tried it and I'm telling you, like you said, it's not a miracle cure, but it did miracles for her. John Dowdy:     Right. And what were your, now you're dealing with two different farriers, so, what were, I mean they obviously saw her in her current condition and then how long was it... while they were on Equinety and until they had seen her again, what were their reactions? Chris Roll:         Probably it was... when they saw her, she was really bad where she wouldn't even stand up. They couldn't even trim her feet while she was standing up. They did her while she was laying down because her feet were so bad.

 

Chris Roll – Founder – heaves – Near Death Mini now doing great!

 

John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. This is a pretty, I’m just going to say, a miraculous one. I always tell people that the Equinety product is not a miracle supplement, but it sure does some miraculous things and I think this story fits right into that category. We’re going to swing up into Pennsylvania. Chris Roll, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Chris Roll:         Thank you, John. It’s good to be here.

John Dowdy:     Well, we’re happy to have you and I’m excited to talk about this one. I actually came across one of your comments in a post that on one of the ads that we were running on Facebook and you told the story of, you have too many ponies in their twenties and one of them was scheduled to be euthanized and then something quite miraculous happened but let’s talk about this one in particular, what you were dealing with prior to finding the Equinety product. What was going on with this one?

Chris Roll:         Okay. This was a mid-twenties miniature horse. She got down where she was stiff-jointed and all she wanted to do was lay down all the time and I thought maybe it was joint problems so I put her on a joint supplement and that didn’t help. And the farrier came and he said that she was foundered so the owner decided we were going to have her euthanized before winter because she wasn’t moving enough to keep her body heat up. I saw ads on Facebook for Equinety and I read the reviews and I said, “let me try this as one last resort for her, if it doesn’t work then we’ll have her euthanized.” Within seven days, this miniature horse back up and it’s been probably two months now or three that she’s been on Equinety and she is now bucking and running and feisty as ever.

John Dowdy:     Now, that’s pretty darn amazing. And again, I got to put the asterisk on this. This is not a miracle supplement. I’m just going to throw that out there. But, let’s go back to some of the stuff that you were dealing with. So, you thought it was a shoulder issue, you were working with a couple of different farriers and they were able to say, “hey, no, this horse is foundered,” which this horse had been foundered before?

Chris Roll:         Prior to us buying her, yes. She had been foundered before, but she was good up until the point where she had gotten down-

John Dowdy:     Sure.

Chris Roll:         …with foot pain.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. And then she was so bad that she just couldn’t really get up, you were having to feed her while she was kind of-

Chris Roll:         No, I fed her out of a feed pan on the ground because she wouldn’t want to get up, I mean, she would just lay there and eat out of this pan.

John Dowdy:     Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris Roll:         And then I’d make her get up so that she can move around because it’s not good for their digestion to lay and eat. So I would make her get up, but she would eat, she would get up and eat and then back down right away.

John Dowdy:     Right. Just in a lot, a lot of pain. Yeah.

Chris Roll:         Right.

John Dowdy:     So-

Chris Roll:         Like I said, I tried joint supplements and I tried Bute and nothing seemed to help her. And then like I said, I read the Equinety reviews and I thought, “why not?” So I tried it and I’m telling you, like you said, it’s not a miracle cure, but it did miracles for her.

John Dowdy:     Right. And what were your, now you’re dealing with two different farriers, so, what were, I mean they obviously saw her in her current condition and then how long was it… while they were on Equinety and until they had seen her again, what were their reactions?

Chris Roll:         Probably it was… when they saw her, she was really bad where she wouldn’t even stand up. They couldn’t even trim her feet while she was standing up. They did her while she was laying down because her feet were so bad. And then after she was on Equinety, I would say probably a month and the farrier came back and he could not believe that she was still there.

John Dowdy:     Wow. Because she was already scheduled to be put down.

Chris Roll:         She was already scheduled, yes. Her grave is dug and it’s still there. We didn’t close it because we figured, well, you know it’s dug and it’s back in this area where it’s not bothering anything, but she’s going to stay around for a while I think.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, yeah. So those farriers must have been pretty shocked then to see her, as you said, when they came back and saw her, like, “what in the world?”

Chris Roll:         Yes, they were. They didn’t expect her to still be there.

John Dowdy:     How about that? So how’s her demeanor and everything nowadays?

Chris Roll:         Oh, she’s great. Like I said, she’s feisty. If I leave the gate open, she goes out and runs up the road and I have to run her down. She’s just back to being the normal little thing she was before all this happened.

John Dowdy:     Oh, wow. That is an amazing story. I tell ya. Now, you have another little mini, what was going on with her?

Chris Roll:         I have another one. She’s a larger, larger pony. She’s aged and she was [heavey 00:02:06] really bad to the point where she just coughed and coughed and coughed, and I thought, “oh, I can’t deal with this poor horse.” She would take 10 steps and then she’d stand there and cough. So I had called the Equinety company and talked to somebody there and they said that Equinety works on the pituitary gland and it helps where the horse needs it. So I thought, “well why not try her on this Equinety too.” So I put her on it and her heaves have gone away.

John Dowdy:     Wow.

Chris Roll:         She now no longer coughs, she rips around, and before when she’d, if she’d run around the barn yard, she’d have to stop and cough. Now she doesn’t.

John Dowdy:     Oh, good.

Chris Roll:         It’s amazing.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Well, and to expand on that just a little bit, the Equinety product, if you’re tuning in for the first time, and maybe you’ve seen us around running ads and wondering what this stuff really is, it’s 100% pure amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein, but they’re specifically combined and formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland which is the master gland in the body. That’s what releases the necessary hormones which then help heal the body at a cellular level. There’s no fillers, there’s no sugars, no starches, there’s no loading dose, and a serving size is 5.2 grams which is not quite a tablespoon. So a very, very small amount, whether it’s in a mini, big draft horse, the pituitary is roughly the same size so they all get the same amount.

And I think you explained it the best, the… give this to the body and the body determines where to [inaudible 00:06:48] those hormones for the healing. So in essence, it’s customizing to what the horse needs. In your first one, we were talking about a serious, a really, really serious condition and situation with the founder, and in the second one with heaves. Completely different things and one little scoop seemed to help. Now, I know you had mentioned to me earlier that you were using another supplement to try to help with the heaves. What did you find with that particular one? How long were you using that one?

Chris Roll:         I was using a supplement that was supposed to help with heaves, with opening them up [inaudible 00:07:26] and helping them to breathe. She was on that daily dose for probably two months and I did not see any results at all with that. With the Equinety, she was on it for probably seven to 10 days and I saw results right away with that.

John Dowdy:     Wow. Yeah, and I will say this as a disclaimer as well. We have a lot of questions. Does this product help with heaves in particular? I would say more often than not, we’ve had very positive feedback. We’ve had people come back to us and say, “no, it didn’t help,” but I don’t know the details. Did they just try it for 15 days? Did they try it for 30? I don’t know that information, so at the end of the day, no matter what you’re going through or what challenges or issues you’re having with your horse, this is a great product to try because it does give the body what it needs to help heal at a cellular level and there’s some pretty miraculous stories. And again, I’ll reiterate, it’s not a miracle supplement, but it sure does some miraculous things as in this story here, so.

Well Chris, I tell ya, I really appreciate you taking the time to share these stories on the Equinety podcast. I know there’s going to be people that will benefit and if there’s somebody that might be listening in for the first time that might be on the fence, “should I try this or not,” what advice would you have to give them?

Chris Roll:         Read the reviews, they can contact me personally, I swear by this stuff, so.

John Dowdy:     Yeah.

Chris Roll:         I highly recommend if you need to try something, try it. Because I went through so many different supplements and this one I found, and it works.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, that’s great. We are blessed for sure, so. Well Chris Roll out of Pennsylvania, thank you so much for taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast.

Chris Roll:         Oh, you’re quite welcome.

John Dowdy:     Okay, thank you, bye-bye.

Chris Roll:         All right, bye.

 

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  Chris Roll - Founder – heaves – Near Death Mini now doing great!   - John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. This is a pretty, I'm just going to say, a miraculous one. I always tell people that the Equinety product i...  <br /> <br /> <br /> Chris Roll - Founder – heaves – Near Death Mini now doing great!<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. This is a pretty, I'm just going to say, a miraculous one. I always tell people that the Equinety product is not a miracle supplement, but it sure does some miraculous things and I think this story fits right into that category. We're going to swing up into Pennsylvania. Chris Roll, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Chris Roll:         Thank you, John. It's good to be here.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Well, we're happy to have you and I'm excited to talk about this one. I actually came across one of your comments in a post that on one of the ads that we were running on Facebook and you told the story of, you have too many ponies in their twenties and one of them was scheduled to be euthanized and then something quite miraculous happened but let's talk about this one in particular, what you were dealing with prior to finding the Equinety product. What was going on with this one?<br /> <br /> Chris Roll:         Okay. This was a mid-twenties miniature horse. She got down where she was stiff-jointed and all she wanted to do was lay down all the time and I thought maybe it was joint problems so I put her on a joint supplement and that didn't help. And the farrier came and he said that she was foundered so the owner decided we were going to have her euthanized before winter because she wasn't moving enough to keep her body heat up. I saw ads on Facebook for Equinety and I read the reviews and I said, "let me try this as one last resort for her, if it doesn't work then we'll have her euthanized." Within seven days, this miniature horse back up and it's been probably two months now or three that she's been on Equinety and she is now bucking and running and feisty as ever.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Now, that's pretty darn amazing. And again, I got to put the asterisk on this. This is not a miracle supplement. I'm just going to throw that out there. But, let's go back to some of the stuff that you were dealing with. So, you thought it was a shoulder issue, you were working with a couple of different farriers and they were able to say, "hey, no, this horse is foundered," which this horse had been foundered before?<br /> <br /> Chris Roll:         Prior to us buying her, yes. She had been foundered before, but she was good up until the point where she had gotten down-<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Sure.<br /> <br /> Chris Roll:         ...with foot pain.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Yeah. And then she was so bad that she just couldn't really get up, you were having to feed her while she was kind of-<br /> <br /> Chris Roll:         No, I fed her out of a feed pan on the ground because she wouldn't want to get up, I mean, she would just lay there and eat out of this pan.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Mm-hmm (affirmative).<br /> <br /> Chris Roll:         And then I'd make her get up so that she can move around because it's not good for their digestion to lay and eat. So I would make her get up, but she would eat, she would get up and eat and then back down right away.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Right. Just in a lot, a lot of pain. Yeah.<br /> <br /> Chris Roll:         Right.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     So-<br /> <br /> Chris Roll:         Like I said, I tried joint supplements and I tried Bute and nothing seemed to help her. And then like I said, I read the Equinety reviews and I thought, "why not?" So I tried it and I'm telling you, like you said, it's not a miracle cure, but it did miracles for her.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Right. And what were your, now you're dealing with two different farriers, so, what were, I mean they obviously saw her in her current condition and then how long was it... while they were on Equinety and until they had seen her again, what were their reactions?<br /> <br /> John Dowdy clean 9:53
045 – Butch Myers – Depressed aging horse – Shoe Boil – thin soles – tender footed https://www.teamequinety.com/045-butch-myers-depressed-aging-horse-shoe-boil-thin-soles-tender-footed/ Wed, 08 Jan 2020 14:00:11 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1839   Butch Myers - Depressed aging horse - Shoe Boil – thin soles – tender footed   John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Falling Waters, West Virginia, and we've got an avid trail rider with a Belgian draft horse and an Oberlander draft. Butch Myers, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Butch Myers:                Thank you for asking me to be on here. I really appreciate it. John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. We appreciate you being on, and in our conversations I hear that you seldom do reviews for products. Butch Myers:                That's correct. Yeah. I usually don't bother with expressing my opinion about things usually. John Dowdy:                 When you've been around for a while and probably have seen a lot of things out on the market, and some don't meet to your standards, sometimes it's hard to put reviews out there. Or I guess it'd be an opportunity to do a lot of negative reviews, but who wants to be in that world, right? Butch Myers:                Yeah, yeah. In the world of supplements, I think you can't really say that any one of them doesn't do ... it might do something for somebody else, but if it doesn't do it for me, then I'm just a one-time buyer. But your product really, I have definite proof that it's helped my horses with a couple of different issues, in both the Oberlander and the Belgian. I warranted that it was definitely worth me saying something about it to you all because I'm very pleased with what it's done so far. John Dowdy:                 Sure. So you've got ... let's first talk about the 27-year-old Belgian draft horse. Barney is his name? Butch Myers:                Yeah. Yeah. Barney. Yes, sir. John Dowdy:                 Yeah, so tell us what was going on with him and then how you found the Equinety and what's happened since you've been using the Equinety. Let's start first with things that you are ... what have you been using him for? Some of the issues that he may have been having or was having, and then go from there. Butch Myers:                Sure. Barney's 27 here in 2019. I bought him when he was 9 going on 10 and used him for a trail horse. He was actually a pulling horse out in the Midwest and I bought him from a guy that bought him from somebody else or whatever. He came through this past winter there in January of this year. He got really skinny. In a draft horse, when they get skinny, they don't look good. Their hip bones stick out and they get ribby and everything. That's what he was doing. I upped his feed substantially and that didn't seem to really help much at all. I actually saw your advertisement on Facebook and it was more or less geared towards thin-soled horses but it did say something in there, I think, about maybe a horse that was unusually thin, that it would help out. So I called your business and talked to a gentleman. He explained to me the theory behind your product and I thought, "Well, you know, it's worthwhile going ahead and buying a tub of it, and just see how it does, if I notice any difference or not." So we started Barney on it, and actually him and the other horse that we'll talk about, but it did, my wife noticed it took about 30 days or so. I figured I had enough with the bigger jar, you have 100 doses in there. John Dowdy:                 Yes. Butch Myers:                So I figured that'd give me 50 doses for each horse. I figured in 50 days, giving them one scoop a day, to see if I'd notice anything. Probably in around the 30-day to 40-day area there, you could notice that Barney was starting to muscle up more through the chest and across his ribs. He was getting a little bit more meat on him and his demeanor, like we talked about, was changing. He was getting a little bit more peppy, like he shaved off a few years. One other thing that I just noticed here, just a couple of weeks ago here,

 

Butch Myers – Depressed aging horse – Shoe Boil – thin soles – tender footed

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We’re going to swing up into Falling Waters, West Virginia, and we’ve got an avid trail rider with a Belgian draft horse and an Oberlander draft. Butch Myers, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Butch Myers:                Thank you for asking me to be on here. I really appreciate it.

John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. We appreciate you being on, and in our conversations I hear that you seldom do reviews for products.

Butch Myers:                That’s correct. Yeah. I usually don’t bother with expressing my opinion about things usually.

John Dowdy:                 When you’ve been around for a while and probably have seen a lot of things out on the market, and some don’t meet to your standards, sometimes it’s hard to put reviews out there. Or I guess it’d be an opportunity to do a lot of negative reviews, but who wants to be in that world, right?

Butch Myers:                Yeah, yeah. In the world of supplements, I think you can’t really say that any one of them doesn’t do … it might do something for somebody else, but if it doesn’t do it for me, then I’m just a one-time buyer. But your product really, I have definite proof that it’s helped my horses with a couple of different issues, in both the Oberlander and the Belgian. I warranted that it was definitely worth me saying something about it to you all because I’m very pleased with what it’s done so far.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. So you’ve got … let’s first talk about the 27-year-old Belgian draft horse. Barney is his name?

Butch Myers:                Yeah. Yeah. Barney. Yes, sir.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, so tell us what was going on with him and then how you found the Equinety and what’s happened since you’ve been using the Equinety. Let’s start first with things that you are … what have you been using him for? Some of the issues that he may have been having or was having, and then go from there.

Butch Myers:                Sure. Barney’s 27 here in 2019. I bought him when he was 9 going on 10 and used him for a trail horse. He was actually a pulling horse out in the Midwest and I bought him from a guy that bought him from somebody else or whatever. He came through this past winter there in January of this year. He got really skinny. In a draft horse, when they get skinny, they don’t look good. Their hip bones stick out and they get ribby and everything. That’s what he was doing. I upped his feed substantially and that didn’t seem to really help much at all.

I actually saw your advertisement on Facebook and it was more or less geared towards thin-soled horses but it did say something in there, I think, about maybe a horse that was unusually thin, that it would help out. So I called your business and talked to a gentleman. He explained to me the theory behind your product and I thought, “Well, you know, it’s worthwhile going ahead and buying a tub of it, and just see how it does, if I notice any difference or not.” So we started Barney on it, and actually him and the other horse that we’ll talk about, but it did, my wife noticed it took about 30 days or so. I figured I had enough with the bigger jar, you have 100 doses in there.

John Dowdy:                 Yes.

Butch Myers:                So I figured that’d give me 50 doses for each horse. I figured in 50 days, giving them one scoop a day, to see if I’d notice anything. Probably in around the 30-day to 40-day area there, you could notice that Barney was starting to muscle up more through the chest and across his ribs. He was getting a little bit more meat on him and his demeanor, like we talked about, was changing. He was getting a little bit more peppy, like he shaved off a few years.

One other thing that I just noticed here, just a couple of weeks ago here, was that he’s had a shoe boil on his right elbow for over a year. I’ve tried antibiotics and different other things, trying to get rid of it. I had a vet look at it and what-not. It just never truly ever went away. But I noticed, grooming him here the other day, that it was totally gone. The only thing that I’ve done has been used your product, and I think that I can attribute that shoe boil being totally gone with the use of your product.

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Butch Myers:                That wasn’t the real thing I was using it for on Barney, but he has muscled up and he looks really good, and his demeanor has gotten extremely good here since I’ve been using your product. I’ve only used one scoop a day.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Now, let me ask you this because you’ve had this horse for a while, so you know his body composition, his demeanor and you do a lot of trail riding.

Butch Myers:                Uh-huh (affirmative).

John Dowdy:                 As you mentioned coming out of this winter, tell us about his feeding program with what he gets. Although this winter he was just thin. There’s something else.

Butch Myers:                Yeah, we feed a high fat, low carb, low sugar feed. It’s got about 22% fat, plus sometimes I’ll add oil to it also, vegetable oil. He gets fed twice a day. Before I upped his feed, I was giving him two pounds in the morning … no, actually he was getting one pound in the morning and two pounds in the evening. And then we use second cutting orchard grass or second cutting broom grass hay. Yeah, what I ended up doing was upping his feed to two pounds in the morning and four pounds in the evening. Even at that, he still wasn’t gaining any weight. I also started giving him some alfalfa hay and didn’t really see a big [inaudible 00:06:20]. It was really starting to worry me because I want to keep him around as long as I can.

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Butch Myers:                27 years old for a draft horse is really very good because their average lifespan’s about 18 years.

John Dowdy:                 Wow.

Butch Myers:                So 27 is … I’ve talked to some people that’s had them for 30 and that’s good. I just like to keep him around and keep him healthy if I can. I was really worried about coming into this winter, if I couldn’t get some weight on him and getting set up right.

John Dowdy:                 Right.

Butch Myers:                I attribute it really to your … because the only change I’ve made is supplementing him with your product. So I have to give credit where credit’s due.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. I appreciate that-

Butch Myers:                Your product.

John Dowdy:                 The Equinety product … and those that are tuning in for the first time … and we often get this question, “Will Equinety help put weight on my horse?” It can, but it’s also … we need to go back to the nutritional aspect of it because that’s so important. In your situation, you know this horse well, you’ve been feeding him what you’ve been feeding them, but for whatever reason he was losing weight. So you upped the feed, that wasn’t helping. So a lot of times what we find is adding the Equinety product, which is 100% pure amino acids, it’s giving the body what it needs to help heal itself from the inside out. So there was something going on in there, a lack of something going on.

You had mentioned that you were just giving one scoop a day. Kind of the science behind that is the amino acids that are in the Equinety product are specifically formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body. That’s what releases the hormones, which then the body sends those hormones to the problem areas. In this case, not only did it help with filling out, building muscle, wasn’t so ribby, but then the shoe boil, which as you mentioned, you weren’t even thinking of that or even purchasing the product for that, [inaudible 00:08:24] and now that’s completely gone, which is pretty awesome.

Butch Myers:                Yeah. Yeah, definitely.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. So we tell people all the time that whatever specific issue you’re trying to solve, there’s so many other benefits because we’re giving the horse what it needs to help heal itself from the inside out. So in addition to all of those benefits, you’ve noticed the horse is happier, more pep in his step, feeling good, demeanor’s changed. So have you seen him like this in a while? You kind of mentioned that he-

Butch Myers:                No, I actually noticed that he was kind of … I don’t know if depressed is the correct word for it or not, but I did notice that he was showing his age-

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Butch Myers:                Besides his getting gray on his face and stuff, which is normal. But yeah, he just wasn’t getting around like he should have. He wasn’t lame or anything like that, but he just looked tired more so than anything, I guess.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah.

Butch Myers:                We did notice that too because like I said, I was really worried about him because I didn’t want to lose him before I have to, but yeah, it’s really helped him out. It really has, because that’s the only thing that I’ve done different since all this has gone on, is just supplementing with your product.

John Dowdy:                 Right. Yeah.

Butch Myers:                [inaudible 00:09:53], I have to-

John Dowdy:                 That’s awesome.

Butch Myers:                Yeah, it really is, I’ll tell you. There’s so many supplements on the market today, and it’s so confusing because you just don’t really know and you can spend a lot of money and not see any change at all. So, I always like to try something new. If it looks like I can get a benefit out of it, we’ll try it. But in most cases, it doesn’t really do what they claim it’s going to do. So I end up being a one-time buyer. But your product really, on my horses, it’s helped. I can see the difference. Whenever you can see the difference, that’s a good thing.

John Dowdy:                 No, absolutely. Now, I didn’t ask you this question before, but what was your thought when you opened up that tub and saw that little tiny scoop for your big old draft horse?

Butch Myers:                Yeah, I didn’t know. Yeah, it’s one of the things, but over the years you kind of learn that sometimes it doesn’t take as much of a good product. If it’s what they say it is, it shouldn’t take a whole bunch of it. So yeah, there’s times whenever … you get these supplements in these 50-pound bags or whatever and they want you to feed two or three pounds. You kind of go, “I wonder just how diluted they really are.” If the product was really concentrated, like I believe yours is, you don’t need to have as much of it, and it goes further.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, that’s right.

Butch Myers:                [crosstalk 00:11:22] good thing, so that’s really good.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. For those tuning in and have never tried the product, the Equinety product, it’s again, 100% pure amino acids. There’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches, there’s no loading dose. A serving size is 5.2 grams, which is a tiny little scoop, not even a tablespoon when you measure it out. What’s interesting, whether it’s a draft horse or a mini pony, they all get the same dose because again, this is targeting the pituitary gland, which is roughly the same size in mammals, about size of a pea. That pituitary really doesn’t grow. It’s just kind of that size. So it’s interesting. Now, let’s talk about your other horse, the 11-year-old Oberlander. Tell us about this one and things that you were dealing with prior to using the Equinety.

Butch Myers:                Yes. Actually he belongs to a friend of ours. We keep him at our place, and she got him back in March of this year. We noticed that he was really ouchy, like he’s walking across … we have a pea gravel around our barn area that we keep about three to four inches thick … and noticed that he would just tip toe across that till he got out into the field. The lady that had him beforehand, she would trim his hooves with an electric grinder, and I think she got a little bit overzealous and took too much sole out of him. He was extremely short and very thin soled.

So whenever I saw your ad, besides the possible weight gain on my Belgian, I thought, “Well heck, we’ll give it to the Oberlander to see if that doesn’t help him out with his thin soles.” Like I said, in about the same timeframe that the Belgian … we started seeing changes in the Belgian, we actually saw changes in him too. He’s walking out across the gravel now like he doesn’t mind it at all. He was very noticeably tender-footed. He would really tip toe across. You could just tell he didn’t want to walk across that. He would try to take a shortcut through it and try to get to the grass and stuff like that, as quick as he could. Now, he just walks right out like nothing’s bothering him.

John Dowdy:                 That’s great.

Butch Myers:                Like I said, in about the same timeframe. I’d say both him and Barney both, I’d say about 30 days, about 30 doses. We definitely saw big changes, and like I said, this was all noticeable changes. It wasn’t something that you had to have a vet look at him, and tell you that this is what it is. You can actually see that the horses were benefiting, and that’s the only change that we made was just that, was just your supplement.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, and this is a really neat thing with the Equinety product, is it actually starts working in 24 hours. It triggers that pituitary to release the hormones in 24 hours. So now it’s really just a matter of how much time it takes for you to start seeing things. When it comes to horses that have maybe a lot of stress, anxiety, or is a bit spooky, we’ve heard lots of feedback, they’ve noticed demeanor changes in as little as three days. But when it gets to an overall thing, whether it be helping to fill out, demeanor, they’re happier top line, all these types of things. Even with hooves and the owchiness as you were describing, I would say the vast, vast majority of people do notice changes in 30 days or less.

It’s good from the company’s perspective. It’s great for the owner’s perspective, because this product works relatively quickly and when it comes to … I’ll throw this in there as well because we get a lot of questions of, “Hey, I’m using, you know, these other supplements or I’m using some other medications. Will the Equinety product interfere in any way, shape or form?” The quick answer is no it won’t, because again, it’s 100% pure amino acids, which are the building blocks protein. But we always encourage people to not change anything that you’re doing as far as giving your horse currently, and just add the Equinety product to it.

Just in like you were describing, Butch, you know this was the only thing that you changed, and so that you can attribute it to the Equinety product. Not taking away from the great care and trimming and things that you’re doing, because you’re also a barefoot trimmer. So just add the Equinety product to whatever you’re doing, and then over the next couple of weeks to 30 days, you should definitely start noticing enough of a change. At that point you can decide whether you want to maybe reduce some of the other stuff or take it away all together.

We’re really blessed in that fact, that we’ve got a product that helps in so many ways. It’s great to hear that you’ve got both of your guys feeling good, and you’ve just started three more just very recently, so it hadn’t been enough time yet to notice changes on theirs. So you got a 11-year-old, a Haflinger, and a 30-year-old quarter horse with cracked hooves or cracked heels.

Butch Myers:                Yes.

John Dowdy:                 Yup.

Butch Myers:                Yes, Mm-hmm (affirmative), yes.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, probably the stronger, faster-growing hooves is one of the most common things that we hear. Sometimes, when we’re running ads on Facebook, we have before and afters of weight gain, so people think that this is a weight gain product. But then we have before and afters of heels, or hooves rather, so then people think it’s just a hoof product. But as you’ve kind of described, it’s helping in so many different ways, even with getting rid of that shoe boil, which who knew …

Butch Myers:                Yeah, yeah. Really. Yeah, really if you understand … I always tell people, I’ve only had a horse for 18 years. I know people that have had them all their lives. I just used to, whenever we first got our horses … I’m 65 this year, so I got mine when I was about 47. But we’ve talked to people that have been around horses their whole life and they don’t really understand anatomy, what the organs are supposed to do and how they work, and how things affect everything. I always tell them, “You need to read a little bit more, because there’s so much research and things in horses that are coming to light now, that they didn’t know maybe 10, 15, 20 years ago.”

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Butch Myers:                The thing about whenever I called into your business and I asked the guy about how it works, and he explained how it triggered the pituitary gland, I understood right away how we were working and how it was supposed to work. Basically it’s going to repair whatever’s wrong with the horse. It’s going to say, “Hey, send this repair material to this location,” more or less. So I understood that 100%, whenever he first told me.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, absolutely. Of course, I’ll say in addition to that, of course we always recommend consulting with your veterinarian and making sure that you’re doing the right things from a nutritional aspect, and things like that. But a lot of times, I would say more times than not, this Equinety product seems to be the missing link with a lot of mystery lameness issues, and just a lot of problem areas. I think you described it best. You’re really giving the body what it needs so it can go in and find what needs to be fixed, and fixes it.

Butch Myers:                Yeah.

John Dowdy:                 In general layman’s terms. So, awesome.

Butch Myers:                Yeah, yeah, definitely.

John Dowdy:                 Butch, I really appreciate you taking the time to share your Equinety stories. If there’s anybody tuning in here that maybe they’ve never tried the product, maybe this is the first time hearing about it. What advice or anything would you have to tell them to maybe push them over the fence to give it a go?

Butch Myers:                Really, with all the products on the market today, you can spend a lot of money and not get any results. I’ve tried pretty much everything new that comes on the market. We always like to give it a look, see if [inaudible 00:19:51]. It’s definitely going to be worth your money to try, at least for … if you only have one horse, get the smaller container and try it. Don’t change anything but just add this supplement to it and to your feeding program, and just kind of keep an eye on changes, and the changes aren’t real subtle. On our horse, we saw a big difference, like I said, in about 30 days. Which is really pretty good. It’s very impressive to me because normally you don’t see changes that big in that little time.

John Dowdy:                 True.

Butch Myers:                So it’s definitely doing what the claims are.

John Dowdy:                 Right. Absolutely. We’ll thank you again, Butch. Butch Myers out of-

Butch Myers:                Sure.

John Dowdy:                 … Falling Waters, West Virginia. I sure appreciate you taking the time here on the Equinety podcast.

Butch Myers:                Sure. Thank you for talking to me.

John Dowdy:                 You bet. Thank you. Bye bye.

Butch Myers:                Bye.

 

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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  Butch Myers - Depressed aging horse - Shoe Boil – thin soles – tender footed   - John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Falling Waters, West Virginia,  <br /> Butch Myers - Depressed aging horse - Shoe Boil – thin soles – tender footed<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Falling Waters, West Virginia, and we've got an avid trail rider with a Belgian draft horse and an Oberlander draft. Butch Myers, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Butch Myers:                Thank you for asking me to be on here. I really appreciate it.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. We appreciate you being on, and in our conversations I hear that you seldom do reviews for products.<br /> <br /> Butch Myers:                That's correct. Yeah. I usually don't bother with expressing my opinion about things usually.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 When you've been around for a while and probably have seen a lot of things out on the market, and some don't meet to your standards, sometimes it's hard to put reviews out there. Or I guess it'd be an opportunity to do a lot of negative reviews, but who wants to be in that world, right?<br /> <br /> Butch Myers:                Yeah, yeah. In the world of supplements, I think you can't really say that any one of them doesn't do ... it might do something for somebody else, but if it doesn't do it for me, then I'm just a one-time buyer. But your product really, I have definite proof that it's helped my horses with a couple of different issues, in both the Oberlander and the Belgian. I warranted that it was definitely worth me saying something about it to you all because I'm very pleased with what it's done so far.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Sure. So you've got ... let's first talk about the 27-year-old Belgian draft horse. Barney is his name?<br /> <br /> Butch Myers:                Yeah. Yeah. Barney. Yes, sir.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yeah, so tell us what was going on with him and then how you found the Equinety and what's happened since you've been using the Equinety. Let's start first with things that you are ... what have you been using him for? Some of the issues that he may have been having or was having, and then go from there.<br /> <br /> Butch Myers:                Sure. Barney's 27 here in 2019. I bought him when he was 9 going on 10 and used him for a trail horse. He was actually a pulling horse out in the Midwest and I bought him from a guy that bought him from somebody else or whatever. He came through this past winter there in January of this year. He got really skinny. In a draft horse, when they get skinny, they don't look good. Their hip bones stick out and they get ribby and everything. That's what he was doing. I upped his feed substantially and that didn't seem to really help much at all.<br /> <br /> I actually saw your advertisement on Facebook and it was more or less geared towards thin-soled horses but it did say something in there, I think, about maybe a horse that was unusually thin, that it would help out. So I called your business and talked to a gentleman. He explained to me the theory behind your product and I thought, "Well, you know, it's worthwhile going ahead and buying a tub of it, and just see how it does, if I notice any difference or not." So we started Barney on it, and actually him and the other horse that we'll talk about, but it did, my wife noticed it took about 30 days or so. I figured I had enough with the bigger jar, you have 100 doses in there.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yes.<br /> <br /> Butch Myers:                So I figured that'd give me 50 doses for each horse. I figured in 50 days, giving them one scoop a day, to see if I'd notice anything. Probably in around the 30-day to 40-day area there, you could notice that Barney was starting to muscle up more through the chest and across his ribs. He was getting a little bit more meat on him and his demeanor, like we talked about, was changing. John Dowdy clean 20:22
044 – Dan Chambers – Senior horse in poor condition – Navicular – Cushings/IR – now bucking and playing! https://www.teamequinety.com/044-dan-chambers-senior-horse-in-poor-condition-navicular-cushings-ir-now-bucking-and-playing/ Wed, 01 Jan 2020 14:00:22 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1815   Dan Chambers – Senior horse in poor condition - Navicular – Cushings/IR – now bucking and playing!   John Dowdy: Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Ohio and we've got Dan Chambers on the call this week. Dan, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Dan Chambers:             Thanks John. Thanks for having us. John Dowdy:                 Well, we're excited to have you on and this week we're going to go into the rescue world. So you and your wife had gone to an auction with no intentions of coming home with a horse. Tell us about that. Dan Chambers:             Yeah, we went to the auction and my wife was looking for a horse for her granddaughter and we stayed there for the auction. They all ran through, we didn't buy anything. We're getting ready to leave. And somebody said "Well, there's a guy out here and he's got a horse for sale." So we talked to the guy for a while and he had a great big old guy. He was probably about 15 or so at that time. We've had him for about eight years now and we bought him at the sale because we were able to ride him and do things with him, and then we paid to the owner at that time for the horse and then he left him at the sale until we could find a ride for him later that evening. After that, the guy that sold him just disappeared. We never saw him again. So we went to get the horse. He was in a stall and after the tack was removed and everything out there, he didn't look like the same horse at all. He just really was underweight, didn't want to move very well and we bought him and brought him home. Had somebody haul him in for us and he got into to our house. And when they got him off the trailer here, we assumed right away, we'd kind of been duped with some drugs or something. That's the assumption on our part, but that horse could barely move when he got home and for days and weeks afterwards you kept thinking, "Well, maybe you'll get a little better here. Something will happen." We knew he was underweight, so we put a lot of groceries on him. Probably got about 200 or 300 pounds on him and he just never did move well. He would move with his shoulders. If he wanted to step to the side, he would have to take a step. Let's say he's going to the right. He would take a step with his right front, bring the left front to make the right steps or stutter stepping all the way around. He couldn't do a very fluid move or cross over with his front legs ,and it looked like it was really painful for him. John Dowdy:                 Right. Dan Chambers:             So we had a vet come out, check him over. I thought maybe I had some shoulder or leg problems. The vet did some radiographs when we found, and he was diagnosed with navicular syndrome, with degeneration of the navicular bone that wasn't good, and that's probably never going to get any better. We can do things to ease him up by using corrective shoeing. So we had the farriers come out and work in conjunction with the vet and do corrective shoeing with the rocker shoes and shortening the toe of the horse to get a more breakover and also to lift the heels off the ground more, so that he would not get as much pressure on that navicular bone from the deep digital flexor tendon putting pressure on him. And that seemed to help him somewhat. We rose him a little bit and we could ride him for a little, but he wasn't ridden very well. His movements were coarse, they were very difficult. He could walk and trot fairly well, but with the lunge.. a lope was just lunging in the front end to get off of his front feet and coming down and it wasn't fun to ride. So we kind of basically quit. Didn't have a whole lot of other options at that time. John Dowdy:                 Yeah. And you were having to use some Bute and stuff periodically? Dan Chambers:             We were using Bute on him, yes. But you know, we don't want to maintain that.

 

Dan Chambers – Senior horse in poor condition –
Navicular – Cushings/IR – now bucking and playing!

 

John Dowdy:

Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We’re going to swing up into Ohio and we’ve got Dan Chambers on the call this week. Dan, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Dan Chambers:             Thanks John. Thanks for having us.

John Dowdy:                 Well, we’re excited to have you on and this week we’re going to go into the rescue world. So you and your wife had gone to an auction with no intentions of coming home with a horse. Tell us about that.

Dan Chambers:             Yeah, we went to the auction and my wife was looking for a horse for her granddaughter and we stayed there for the auction. They all ran through, we didn’t buy anything. We’re getting ready to leave. And somebody said “Well, there’s a guy out here and he’s got a horse for sale.” So we talked to the guy for a while and he had a great big old guy. He was probably about 15 or so at that time. We’ve had him for about eight years now and we bought him at the sale because we were able to ride him and do things with him, and then we paid to the owner at that time for the horse and then he left him at the sale until we could find a ride for him later that evening. After that, the guy that sold him just disappeared. We never saw him again.

So we went to get the horse. He was in a stall and after the tack was removed and everything out there, he didn’t look like the same horse at all. He just really was underweight, didn’t want to move very well and we bought him and brought him home. Had somebody haul him in for us and he got into to our house. And when they got him off the trailer here, we assumed right away, we’d kind of been duped with some drugs or something. That’s the assumption on our part, but that horse could barely move when he got home and for days and weeks afterwards you kept thinking, “Well, maybe you’ll get a little better here. Something will happen.” We knew he was underweight, so we put a lot of groceries on him. Probably got about 200 or 300 pounds on him and he just never did move well.

He would move with his shoulders. If he wanted to step to the side, he would have to take a step. Let’s say he’s going to the right. He would take a step with his right front, bring the left front to make the right steps or stutter stepping all the way around. He couldn’t do a very fluid move or cross over with his front legs ,and it looked like it was really painful for him.

John Dowdy:                 Right.

Dan Chambers:             So we had a vet come out, check him over. I thought maybe I had some shoulder or leg problems. The vet did some radiographs when we found, and he was diagnosed with navicular syndrome, with degeneration of the navicular bone that wasn’t good, and that’s probably never going to get any better. We can do things to ease him up by using corrective shoeing.

So we had the farriers come out and work in conjunction with the vet and do corrective shoeing with the rocker shoes and shortening the toe of the horse to get a more breakover and also to lift the heels off the ground more, so that he would not get as much pressure on that navicular bone from the deep digital flexor tendon putting pressure on him. And that seemed to help him somewhat. We rose him a little bit and we could ride him for a little, but he wasn’t ridden very well. His movements were coarse, they were very difficult. He could walk and trot fairly well, but with the lunge.. a lope was just lunging in the front end to get off of his front feet and coming down and it wasn’t fun to ride. So we kind of basically quit. Didn’t have a whole lot of other options at that time.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. And you were having to use some Bute and stuff periodically?

Dan Chambers:             We were using Bute on him, yes. But you know, we don’t want to maintain that. It’s a little hard on her kidneys and stuff. So we hope they didn’t do that. But I found another product called Equi-Bone, I believe it was. And we used that for a while and went through a bag or two of that, and I didn’t see any real results. So that went on for a period of time. And then I did some more research trying to find something to help this old guy, because he’s a sweet horse but he just got a lot of problems.

John Dowdy:                 Right.

Dan Chambers:             We got his weight up and everything and he was looking good there. And then we found a product called Osphos, I think that’s correct pronunciation. Osphos. It’s a shot they give them. It’s Supposed to help horses with that and we saw limited results from it. You can only do it once every six months. I went through two series of that. A little bit of improvement but not much. And it was transitory. It didn’t stay.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah.

Dan Chambers:             So within the last five months or so, we found the Equinety product and we’ve used that, and we’ve seen a miraculous difference in this horse. This horse, who before, was barely able to just walk out to the pastures following the other herd that he runs with when we turn them out, to galloping now. He’s running with them, trotting. He’s mock fighting with the horses to… likely, He feels like playing anymore. And I’ve seen him even stand on his front legs and kick his heels clear over the top of his head. So that was unheard of, for him to [crosstalk 00:15:33]

John Dowdy:                 Yeah.

Dan Chambers:             He’s doing quite well. Much better on this product now.

John Dowdy:                 Well that’s great. Well, and I think for those who are tuning in for the first time, and maybe just hearing about this, Equinety product for the first time… It’s a 100% pure amino acids. So there’s no fillers, there’s no sugars, no starches, and there’s no loading dose. A serving size is 5.2 grams, which is not quite a tablespoon. Just put it right on as a top dressing. And what these amino acids are specifically formulated to do is stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body. That’s what releases the hormones, which are then going to go throughout the body to help repair at a cellular level. So it’s customizing to what the horse needs, exactly. And then in this situation you got a rescue horse that… diagnosed with navicular and through the care of… with what you know to do to help put on weight, you got to vet out to see what was going on, and you tried different things, little results. But you know, nothing long term by any means, until the Equinety. So now you’ve had the horse on the Equinety for around five, six months, you said?

Dan Chambers:             Approximately that timeframe, yes.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. So that’s a really interesting thing with this product. And it’s one of the reasons why we have the podcast to share these stories because you know, sometimes if you’re at your wit’s end or if you don’t know what else to do or try and people can hear from others that might be dealing with a similar situation.

So I know up in Ohio right now, it’s a winter time, so probably not doing much of any riding up there now, or are you kind of just trying to heal him up until you can ride him in the springtime? What’s your goal there?

Dan Chambers:             Well, in the spring, hopefully we’ll certainly reintroduce riding to him more frequently than what we have now. Right now it’s been very limited because, got a lot of rain, a lot of mud and water, stuff like that. So we’re not doing much. But you know, I move around a lot with a lot of other horses as a horse trainer and a certified equine massage therapist. So I run into a lot of other people and I’ve recommended this product to them as well for different areas in their horses too. And I’ve got two other people that I know are using the product now. I’m looking forward to seeing what their results going to be.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. That’s great. Yeah, we do have a lot of practitioners and trainers that… they use the product, recommend the product. We’re blessed in that way for sure. And you know, anytime that you’re going to add the Equinety product to these other things, whether it be the massage or chiropractic or anything that you’re doing, it really just helps amplify what your ultimate goal is, and that’s to help get the horse healthy and happy. So, and feeling good. So well, I tell you what if there’s anybody listening in for the first time that might be a little skeptical, or on the fence, is there anything that you would have to say to them to maybe get them to give it a try?

Dan Chambers:             Well I would tell them for one thing… We all know that every horse owner out there always wants to do the best that best they possibly can for their horse. And as a result of… you’re not going to lose anything if you try this product. I believe in the product. I think it’s done a good job. It’s certainly helped us with a horse, and I believe in giving the building blocks to the body of a horse in order to have the necessary resources there for the horses to kind of help heal themselves and to have the necessary things there to do that with. And I think those amino acids do that. One thing I hadn’t told you about before is, I forgot if there’s a…we had this guy tested it too, this old guy, and he’s Cushing’s and insulin resistant as well. [crosstalk 00:19:12]

John Dowdy:                 Well yeah. I hate just leave that out.

Dan Chambers:             Yeah. [inaudible 00:19:18] We had that problem with him too, so he had his issues. But you know, his quality of life has improved immensely since we’ve gotten him.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. You know what, I’m, since you brought that up, we do have a lot of people that ask, “Is this product safe for Cushing’s and IR horses?” And one of the, I would say, concerns or question marks, that come up… because when we’re dealing with pituitary and with Cushing’s horses, there’s a tumor on the pituitary that’s excreting too much of one of the hormones and that’s what causes a lot of the negative things that go on with Cushing’s horses. And with our product, the amino acids are specifically combined to stimulate the pituitary. So is there any negativity or any downside to doing this? Well what we’re after, out of this pituitary gland, is the growth hormone, because the growth hormone is the master hormone and that’s what triggers another hormone out of the liver called IGF-1 or insulin growth factor one.

So the combination of these hormones are what go through the body to help repair and regenerate. And I think just hearing the story about your old guy here… It’s really helping to balance the horse from the inside out, and wherever that balance needs to happen. So with a Cushing’s IR horse that’s now been using this product for five to six months-time frame, you’re seeing nothing but positive changes. Really, I mean that’s what’s going on. And you’ve tried a lot of other things. I mean you’ve been around for a while, so you did everything that you knew to, to try to help the horse. And I guess it’d be fair to say that when you tried the Equinety, that’s when you really started seeing the positive impact on it.

Dan Chambers:             Yeah, we’ve certainly seen an impact in his disposition with his alertness, with his willingness to run and play with the other horses. With the Cushing’s, of course, they get very hairy and they don’t shed out well and stuff like that. And I’m really looking forward to, in the spring, seeing how that happens with him now that we’ve got him on this product, to see how easily he sheds out that excess hair this year. Because last year he was really hairy. I mean, he looked like a woolly mammoth. But this year his coat is there and it’s long, but it’s not as long as it was previously, I don’t believe. So I’m kind of looking for progress there.

John Dowdy:                 Yes. While I tell you what, I would love to do a followup podcast on this and we’ll see how he’s doing in the spring.

Dan Chambers:             Great. Great. Sounds good.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, that’d be great. Well, Dan Chambers out of Ohio, I really appreciate you taking the time to share your Equinety story here on the Equinety podcast.

Dan Chambers:             My pleasure, sir.

John Dowdy:                 All right.

Dan Chambers:             Do anything to help the horses, I’m all for it.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, absolutely. Well, thank you and bye-bye.

Dan Chambers:             Bye.

John Dowdy:                 All right.

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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  Dan Chambers – Senior horse in poor condition - Navicular – Cushings/IR – now bucking and playing!   - John Dowdy: - Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Ohio and we've got Dan Chambers on the call ...  <br /> <br /> <br /> Dan Chambers – Senior horse in poor condition -<br /> Navicular – Cushings/IR – now bucking and playing!<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:<br /> <br /> Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Ohio and we've got Dan Chambers on the call this week. Dan, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Dan Chambers:             Thanks John. Thanks for having us.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Well, we're excited to have you on and this week we're going to go into the rescue world. So you and your wife had gone to an auction with no intentions of coming home with a horse. Tell us about that.<br /> <br /> Dan Chambers:             Yeah, we went to the auction and my wife was looking for a horse for her granddaughter and we stayed there for the auction. They all ran through, we didn't buy anything. We're getting ready to leave. And somebody said "Well, there's a guy out here and he's got a horse for sale." So we talked to the guy for a while and he had a great big old guy. He was probably about 15 or so at that time. We've had him for about eight years now and we bought him at the sale because we were able to ride him and do things with him, and then we paid to the owner at that time for the horse and then he left him at the sale until we could find a ride for him later that evening. After that, the guy that sold him just disappeared. We never saw him again.<br /> <br /> So we went to get the horse. He was in a stall and after the tack was removed and everything out there, he didn't look like the same horse at all. He just really was underweight, didn't want to move very well and we bought him and brought him home. Had somebody haul him in for us and he got into to our house. And when they got him off the trailer here, we assumed right away, we'd kind of been duped with some drugs or something. That's the assumption on our part, but that horse could barely move when he got home and for days and weeks afterwards you kept thinking, "Well, maybe you'll get a little better here. Something will happen." We knew he was underweight, so we put a lot of groceries on him. Probably got about 200 or 300 pounds on him and he just never did move well.<br /> <br /> He would move with his shoulders. If he wanted to step to the side, he would have to take a step. Let's say he's going to the right. He would take a step with his right front, bring the left front to make the right steps or stutter stepping all the way around. He couldn't do a very fluid move or cross over with his front legs ,and it looked like it was really painful for him.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Right.<br /> <br /> Dan Chambers:             So we had a vet come out, check him over. I thought maybe I had some shoulder or leg problems. The vet did some radiographs when we found, and he was diagnosed with navicular syndrome, with degeneration of the navicular bone that wasn't good, and that's probably never going to get any better. We can do things to ease him up by using corrective shoeing.<br /> <br /> So we had the farriers come out and work in conjunction with the vet and do corrective shoeing with the rocker shoes and shortening the toe of the horse to get a more breakover and also to lift the heels off the ground more, so that he would not get as much pressure on that navicular bone from the deep digital flexor tendon putting pressure on him. And that seemed to help him somewhat. We rose him a little bit and we could ride him for a little, but he wasn't ridden very well. His movements were coarse, they were very difficult. He could walk and trot fairly well, but with the lunge.. a lope was just lunging in the front end to get off of his front feet and coming down and it wasn't fun to ride. So we kind of basically quit. Didn't have a whole lot of other options at that time.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yeah. And you were having to use some Bute and stuff p... John Dowdy clean 11:49
043 – Marlies Parent – New environment – Stressed – Rain Rot – Stronger Hooves – Weight gain – Happier https://www.teamequinety.com/043-marlies-parent-new-environment-stressed-rain-rot-stronger-hooves-weight-gain-happier/ Wed, 25 Dec 2019 14:00:10 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1811     Marlies Parent - New environment - Stressed - Rain Rot - Stronger Hooves - Weight gain - Happier   John Dowdy:     Hello, and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Tennessee, and we've got Marlise Parent on the call this week. She going to be talking about her four-year-old Appaloosa. Marlise, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Marlise Parent: Hey John, I'm really glad to be here. John Dowdy:     Great, well we're happy to have you, and let's jump right into this. I saw you commenting on some of our ads on Facebook, on some of the ads that we have going. So I reached out to you because I thought your story with your horse was pretty darn interesting, and could benefit anybody that might be going through the same thing. So tell us a little bit about how you acquired this Appaloosa, and what was going on when you brought him to your place. Marlise Parent: I'm more than happy to. I purchased him in March this year, and he was delivered to me ... from Iowa. Back in that time, they had a minus 60 degrees temperatures. It was really cold, and he walked off the floats with three blankets really bundled up. At that time in Tennessee, we were already at 65 degrees. So when he came off, he experienced not only extreme climate change, but everything else that came with it. A new owner, a new pasture, a new stable, pretty much everything around him changed. And I do believe he had a little culture shock, I would say I would call it for us humans when we move. John Dowdy:     All right. Yeah, absolutely. So what was his previous life like? Marlise Parent: Well, he was a stable horse. He was stabled at night. During the day, I think they did turn him out into the pasture, but he was very well taken care of. He was a halter horse, he was a show horse, and he was babied. He still is to an extent, but in his new home, he's allowed to be more of a horse than anything else. He's a trail horse now and just ... living the good life, I hope. John Dowdy:     Yeah. Hey, that's what they need. Right? So, what did you start noticing going on? And I think you as we were previously talking around a five or six months, you are kind of having some issues and noticed some weight loss going on. Marlise Parent: Exactly. I do believe the biggest problem was the diet change that he had ... and he was a show horse. They had him on a very specific diet. They bucket-fed him most of the times as he was stabled, and when he came here, he turned out into the pasture and that was pretty much it. I noticed he started losing a lot of weight because vegetation over here obviously is different as well. So, when I started worrying about his weight, I started looking up online things and at one point, Equinety popped up on my news feed on Facebook. I started looking at the pictures, I started looking at the reviews, did some more research online about it, and I figured, well, there's not much I can do wrong. If it helps, great. If not, I guess I'm just going to have to look for something else or something more to help him ... on not only the weight loss, but also an extreme case of rain rot that he acquired because he wasn't shedding after he moved from that cold environment to the relatively early, hot environment over here. So I ordered the product, and I gave it a shot. John Dowdy:     Yes, and in addition, to that, you, his hooves were also pretty brittle too, weren't they? Marlise Parent: Yes, they were fairly soft. He's got four white hooves, and they were soft and my farrier office said try to put some oil on it and treat it, and there was this and that and the other. But once I put him on the Equinety, it just, it just literally fixed all the issues that I had with him within a fairly good amount of time too. John Dowdy:     Yep. Marlise Parent: His rain rot went away within, I don't, don't even lie, within about four weeks. John Dowdy:     Yeah.

 

 

Marlies Parent – New environment – Stressed –
Rain Rot – Stronger Hooves – Weight gain – Happier

 

John Dowdy:     Hello, and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We’re going to swing up into Tennessee, and we’ve got Marlise Parent on the call this week. She going to be talking about her four-year-old Appaloosa. Marlise, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Marlise Parent: Hey John, I’m really glad to be here.

John Dowdy:     Great, well we’re happy to have you, and let’s jump right into this. I saw you commenting on some of our ads on Facebook, on some of the ads that we have going. So I reached out to you because I thought your story with your horse was pretty darn interesting, and could benefit anybody that might be going through the same thing. So tell us a little bit about how you acquired this Appaloosa, and what was going on when you brought him to your place.

Marlise Parent: I’m more than happy to. I purchased him in March this year, and he was delivered to me … from Iowa. Back in that time, they had a minus 60 degrees temperatures. It was really cold, and he walked off the floats with three blankets really bundled up. At that time in Tennessee, we were already at 65 degrees. So when he came off, he experienced not only extreme climate change, but everything else that came with it. A new owner, a new pasture, a new stable, pretty much everything around him changed. And I do believe he had a little culture shock, I would say I would call it for us humans when we move.

John Dowdy:     All right. Yeah, absolutely. So what was his previous life like?

Marlise Parent: Well, he was a stable horse. He was stabled at night. During the day, I think they did turn him out into the pasture, but he was very well taken care of. He was a halter horse, he was a show horse, and he was babied. He still is to an extent, but in his new home, he’s allowed to be more of a horse than anything else. He’s a trail horse now and just … living the good life, I hope.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Hey, that’s what they need. Right? So, what did you start noticing going on? And I think you as we were previously talking around a five or six months, you are kind of having some issues and noticed some weight loss going on.

Marlise Parent: Exactly. I do believe the biggest problem was the diet change that he had … and he was a show horse. They had him on a very specific diet. They bucket-fed him most of the times as he was stabled, and when he came here, he turned out into the pasture and that was pretty much it. I noticed he started losing a lot of weight because vegetation over here obviously is different as well. So, when I started worrying about his weight, I started looking up online things and at one point, Equinety popped up on my news feed on Facebook.

I started looking at the pictures, I started looking at the reviews, did some more research online about it, and I figured, well, there’s not much I can do wrong. If it helps, great. If not, I guess I’m just going to have to look for something else or something more to help him … on not only the weight loss, but also an extreme case of rain rot that he acquired because he wasn’t shedding after he moved from that cold environment to the relatively early, hot environment over here. So I ordered the product, and I gave it a shot.

John Dowdy:     Yes, and in addition, to that, you, his hooves were also pretty brittle too, weren’t they?

Marlise Parent: Yes, they were fairly soft. He’s got four white hooves, and they were soft and my farrier office said try to put some oil on it and treat it, and there was this and that and the other. But once I put him on the Equinety, it just, it just literally fixed all the issues that I had with him within a fairly good amount of time too.

John Dowdy:     Yep.

Marlise Parent: His rain rot went away within, I don’t, don’t even lie, within about four weeks.

John Dowdy:     Yeah.

Marlise Parent: It is a pretty straining process if you, you don’t cut them down, and you’ve got to scrape everything off, and it’s kind of a pain. But it took care of that within a short amount of time. His hooves got way harder, more solid. His fur turned into absolutely beautiful, shiny and he’s, since he’s an Appaloosa, he’s a, what we call a snow-cap. So he’s brown up-front, and he’s got a white rear end.

John Dowdy:     Oh.

Marlise Parent: And it was amazing. Like his fur … was beautiful during the summer, minus the minor mud flaps that we had.

John Dowdy:     Right, right. Yeah. Now, and what did your farrier think about the quality of the hooves after being on the Equinety for what? What’d you say? Four to six weeks by that time?

Marlise Parent: Yeah, something like that. And he, he loved it. I actually got him to purchase it.

John Dowdy:     Oh nice.

Marlise Parent: Yeah, he absolutely loves it. He’s never seen a change in, in hooves that quickly. And it’s, it even helps. I have a friend, she’s got her horse standing there too, and she had an abscess. So my friend was using the Equinety on her mare for a couple weeks, and the abscess just, it just disappeared so quickly. She stopped limping and starts walking properly again. So I mean it’s a miracle product to be honest.

John Dowdy:     Well.

Marlise Parent: I don’t talk like that about a lot of things.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Well I tell you what, we have heard, I tell people it’s not a miracle supplement, but it sure does some miraculous things.

Marlise Parent: Yeah.

John Dowdy:     And for those tuning in for the first time, what this product is, it’s 100% pure amino acids. There’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches, there’s no loading dose. Serving size is 5.2 grams, so not quite a tablespoon. But the amino acids are specifically formulated to give the body what it needs to stimulate the pituitary gland, which releases the necessary hormones, which help heal the body at a cellular level. So in what we’re talking about here, rain rot, brutal hooves, the coat ended up being a lot softer shiny. And how about the, with the weight loss that was going on, and you even tried to mimic the diet that he previously had, but what’s happened with weight gain and things like that now that it’s been, well since May of this year, so about eight months total that we’ve been on this. How, how’s he doing now? Weight gain, looking, feeling, demeanor, all that kind of stuff.

Marlise Parent: Oh, he’s doing absolutely amazing. He’s gained some great winter weight. I like him a little chunkier during the winter, since there’s not much out there to eat. And we kind of have to supplement with a whole bunch of other stuff. He is happy. He’s finally kind of included himself into the band where he was rather a loner in the beginning. So that’s a great thing. And what I noticed too, in the beginning, he had, he’s kind of accident prone.

John Dowdy:     Need to be bubble wrapped, does he?

Marlise Parent: Yes, yes. I was thinking that. I actually saw somebody wrapping their horse in bubbles. Yes, he’s one of those. His scratches and all that, that he kind of obtained throughout the days, heal very, very quickly. I technically don’t even need an external ointment for them anymore. It just takes a day for it to just close up, and it’s amazing. I, I don’t know what else to say.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, well and that goes to show the healing process, and I in all the phone calls and emails and feedback that we receive, I would say in every single scenario where we’re talking about an injured horse and whether it be cuts, scrapes or you get into tears, even with ligaments and tendons and deep flexor tendons and muscles and things, when they’re using the Equinety, they have seemed to always heal ahead of schedule in whatever that schedule is. As long as they don’t re-injure themselves, obviously. But in those scenarios, they always do heal ahead of schedule, so which is great.

Marlise Parent: Agreed.

John Dowdy:     So yeah, absolutely. So he is now just a loving life.

Marlise Parent: Yes, yes he is. He’s out in the pasture and probably today getting wet because it’s raining. But I’m pretty sure that the rain rot is going to stay away.

John Dowdy:     That’s great. Yeah. Now, I’ll, I’ll ask you this question cause you’ve been around horses for many, many, many years and you know, somebody tuning into this and maybe they’re bringing a horse into a new environment, like what you’ve done and you know, they’re thinking, well of course a horse is going to acclimate over, eight months or seven months or whatever. I mean what other option do they have? But you know, with your opinion, based on your experience, do you feel that by adding the Equinety product helps speed up that process, or I mean what’s your opinion on that or your thoughts?

Marlise Parent: I definitely do think that it helps. Like I said, he went from being completely bucket-fed on the bucket fed diet with a whole bunch of different supplements and oils and grains and things like that to a pasture-only horse and diets. So … I do believe it definitely helped him acclimate to that new diet. I did feed him a little bit of weight gainer as well because he lost rapidly. He lost about 200 pounds in the first three months, which was extreme.

John Dowdy:     Right.

Marlise Parent: And that’s on the summer pasture. So with the little bit of weight gainer and the Equinety, he just bounced back within about three and a half, four months, all the weight loss that he had. So I’m, I’m definitely saying that it was a big part of him adjusting quicker and his intestinal system to adjust better to the new diet that he’s going to live on.

John Dowdy:     Right. Yeah. And I think it’s important for people to know too. I mean it’s, it’s not like, hey this is a miracle thing, you just add this and it fixes everything. I mean you are doing everything that you felt like you needed to do on your side, and this just enhanced and sped up a lot of things that you were already doing. So I think that’s important as well. Now for anybody that’s tuning in for the first time, that might be a little skeptical about this whole Equinety thing. What was, and you may have mentioned this earlier, but what was your take? How skeptical were you, and what advice would you give to them to go ahead and give the product to try?

Marlise Parent: I was very skeptical because there’s so many products out there that everybody is trying to sell. They’re trying to make money, which is kind of understandable, but every horse owner has the worry is what I’m giving my horse the right thing for my horse? Is it going to not just improve it? Is it, could it possibly be hurtful? You never know. So I, I definitely was very skeptical. The price kind of, in the beginning took me back too, but thinking about that one little case lasts for three months, because the portion is really itty bitty, and when I got that little scoop out, I was like, okay, well that’s not too bad.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Yeah. A little, I know you’re like this little tiny scoop does everything? Yeah.

Marlise Parent: Yep. And it, it definitely does. It’s, it’s very surprising and very convincing. Definitely convincing.

John Dowdy:     Mm-hmm (affirmative) Yeah, and for as quickly as it works, I mean, that surprises a lot of people as well. This product actually does start working in 24 hours. It’s just a matter of how quickly you can begin to see the changes, so yeah.

Marlise Parent: Yeah.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, so.

Marlise Parent: I mean, I’ve, I’ve seen from him going from adult coat because of the rain rot and everything that he went through, and I think he was also stressed. Obviously, the change new people, different horses, you had to be outside, it was, it was definitely stressful, and I do believe it did help him as well with his stressing and anxiety to manage that as well.

John Dowdy:     Right.

Marlise Parent: He became quite fast, really mellow and enjoyed actually even being by himself. He, it didn’t bother him, being by himself, and so I’m really grateful for the product. I’m definitely a lifelong member now.

John Dowdy:     Great. Well we’re glad to have you on board, and especially to share your story here. We appreciate it. Marlise Parent out of Tennessee. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast.

Marlise Parent: You’re very welcome. It was great talking to you.

John Dowdy:     All right. Thank you. Bye, bye.

Marlise Parent: Bye.

 

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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  -   Marlies Parent - New environment - Stressed - Rain Rot - Stronger Hooves - Weight gain - Happier   - John Dowdy:     Hello, and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Tennessee,  <br /> <br />  <br /> Marlies Parent - New environment - Stressed -<br /> Rain Rot - Stronger Hooves - Weight gain - Happier<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Hello, and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Tennessee, and we've got Marlise Parent on the call this week. She going to be talking about her four-year-old Appaloosa. Marlise, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Marlise Parent: Hey John, I'm really glad to be here.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Great, well we're happy to have you, and let's jump right into this. I saw you commenting on some of our ads on Facebook, on some of the ads that we have going. So I reached out to you because I thought your story with your horse was pretty darn interesting, and could benefit anybody that might be going through the same thing. So tell us a little bit about how you acquired this Appaloosa, and what was going on when you brought him to your place.<br /> <br /> Marlise Parent: I'm more than happy to. I purchased him in March this year, and he was delivered to me ... from Iowa. Back in that time, they had a minus 60 degrees temperatures. It was really cold, and he walked off the floats with three blankets really bundled up. At that time in Tennessee, we were already at 65 degrees. So when he came off, he experienced not only extreme climate change, but everything else that came with it. A new owner, a new pasture, a new stable, pretty much everything around him changed. And I do believe he had a little culture shock, I would say I would call it for us humans when we move.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     All right. Yeah, absolutely. So what was his previous life like?<br /> <br /> Marlise Parent: Well, he was a stable horse. He was stabled at night. During the day, I think they did turn him out into the pasture, but he was very well taken care of. He was a halter horse, he was a show horse, and he was babied. He still is to an extent, but in his new home, he's allowed to be more of a horse than anything else. He's a trail horse now and just ... living the good life, I hope.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Yeah. Hey, that's what they need. Right? So, what did you start noticing going on? And I think you as we were previously talking around a five or six months, you are kind of having some issues and noticed some weight loss going on.<br /> <br /> Marlise Parent: Exactly. I do believe the biggest problem was the diet change that he had ... and he was a show horse. They had him on a very specific diet. They bucket-fed him most of the times as he was stabled, and when he came here, he turned out into the pasture and that was pretty much it. I noticed he started losing a lot of weight because vegetation over here obviously is different as well. So, when I started worrying about his weight, I started looking up online things and at one point, Equinety popped up on my news feed on Facebook.<br /> <br /> I started looking at the pictures, I started looking at the reviews, did some more research online about it, and I figured, well, there's not much I can do wrong. If it helps, great. If not, I guess I'm just going to have to look for something else or something more to help him ... on not only the weight loss, but also an extreme case of rain rot that he acquired because he wasn't shedding after he moved from that cold environment to the relatively early, hot environment over here. So I ordered the product, and I gave it a shot.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Yes, and in addition, to that, you, his hooves were also pretty brittle too, weren't they?<br /> <br /> Marlise Parent: Yes, they were fairly soft. He's got four white hooves, and they were soft and my farrier office said try to put some oil on it and treat it, and there was this and that and the other. But once I put him on the Equinety, it just, it just literally fixed all the issues that I had with him within a fairly good amount of time too.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy clean 14:37
042 – Arlene Bara – Lymes Disease – Coughing – Pneumonia – Swelling – Allergies – Inflammation https://www.teamequinety.com/042-arlene-bara-lymes-disease-coughing-pneumonia-swelling-allergies-inflammation/ Wed, 18 Dec 2019 14:00:51 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1808     Arlene Bara - Lymes Disease - Coughing - Pneumonia - Swelling - Allergies - Inflammation     John Dowdy:                 Hello, and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're in for another exciting podcast this week. We're going to swing up into Pennsylvania and speak with Arlene Bara, who, well, let's just get right into this. An amazing story. So, without further ado, Arlene, welcome to the Equinety Podcast. Arlene Bara:                  John, good morning. I'm very excited to be a part of your podcast today. Thank you so much for inviting me. John Dowdy:                 Well, you're very welcome. It's great to have you. I believe I came across your comment on one of our Facebook ads, and I said to myself, "Oh, okay, I've got to get Arlene on this call," because, according to what you wrote, you are having some serious challenges with your 12-year-old. So let's first of all talk about this mare. What things were you dealing with prior to coming across the Equinety? So let's give a little background on her. Arlene Bara:                  Okay, John. Sure. I have a 12-year-old mare here. She's a registered solid paint roan. Beautiful little mare, and I've had her for 11 years. Within the last three years, she developed a cough, and, not being too alarmed, I didn't think too much about it, but then it got progressively worse. So, of course, I called the vet. Over the three-year period here, now I've had three different vets that I have consulted with. One said she has COPD. One says that she has allergies, which I started a series of serums for. She has so many different allergies that the serums just didn't seem to want to work. She had been tested positive for Lyme disease. We live in the mountains here, in the Poconos, and the ticks up here are pretty bad. So I guess it's inevitable, at some point. But she did test positive for Lyme, and I know that Lyme disease is one of those hidden sicknesses that can pop up in your immune system at any time and just do battle. John Dowdy:                 Sure. Arlene Bara:                  So she did come down with some pneumonia. She was treated for the pneumonia but, unfortunately, wasn't healed from it, and she carried that sickness for a couple months until, finally, the third vet that I had came and kind of knocked that out of her. But when I saw your ad, my mare was still coughing and very lackluster. She had lost a lot of weight. Her breathing was labored, and I just was feeling very heavy-hearted. Your ad popped up as I was on Facebook, and I was reading it. I saw some of the comments, and I'm like, "Huh, that's interesting. I think that looks like maybe it's worth a try." John Dowdy:                 Sure. Arlene Bara:                  So I got it, and it came at a good time, because she was suffering again with some inflammation in her legs. It was so bad that I had a hard time getting her to come out of her stall. That's how bad it was. I rubbed her down, and I put liniment on her and wrapped her up. I started her on this Equinety, and I'll tell you what. After three days, that inflammation disappeared, and it hasn't come back. She's been on this Equinety now for, what we did we say, two months? John Dowdy:                 Yeah, two months. But just backing up just a little bit here, so everything's kind of hunky dory, business as usual every day. But she developed a cough. Then she tested positive for Lyme. Then she had pneumonia, and her allergy panel was everything allergic that you can think of. Arlene Bara:                  Yep. John Dowdy:                 It all just seemed to kind of hit over ... What kind of a timeframe was this? Arlene Bara:                  Well, this has gone now, I want to say, starting on the third year. John Dowdy:                 Third year, okay. So you were doing the injections with the allergy serum for a year and a half. Did you see much of a difference with that at all?

 

 

Arlene Bara – Lymes Disease – Coughing –
Pneumonia – Swelling – Allergies – Inflammation

 

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello, and welcome to this week’s Equinety Podcast. We’re in for another exciting podcast this week. We’re going to swing up into Pennsylvania and speak with Arlene Bara, who, well, let’s just get right into this. An amazing story. So, without further ado, Arlene, welcome to the Equinety Podcast.

Arlene Bara:                  John, good morning. I’m very excited to be a part of your podcast today. Thank you so much for inviting me.

John Dowdy:                 Well, you’re very welcome. It’s great to have you. I believe I came across your comment on one of our Facebook ads, and I said to myself, “Oh, okay, I’ve got to get Arlene on this call,” because, according to what you wrote, you are having some serious challenges with your 12-year-old. So let’s first of all talk about this mare. What things were you dealing with prior to coming across the Equinety? So let’s give a little background on her.

Arlene Bara:                  Okay, John. Sure. I have a 12-year-old mare here. She’s a registered solid paint roan. Beautiful little mare, and I’ve had her for 11 years. Within the last three years, she developed a cough, and, not being too alarmed, I didn’t think too much about it, but then it got progressively worse.

So, of course, I called the vet. Over the three-year period here, now I’ve had three different vets that I have consulted with. One said she has COPD. One says that she has allergies, which I started a series of serums for. She has so many different allergies that the serums just didn’t seem to want to work. She had been tested positive for Lyme disease. We live in the mountains here, in the Poconos, and the ticks up here are pretty bad. So I guess it’s inevitable, at some point. But she did test positive for Lyme, and I know that Lyme disease is one of those hidden sicknesses that can pop up in your immune system at any time and just do battle.

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Arlene Bara:                  So she did come down with some pneumonia. She was treated for the pneumonia but, unfortunately, wasn’t healed from it, and she carried that sickness for a couple months until, finally, the third vet that I had came and kind of knocked that out of her.

But when I saw your ad, my mare was still coughing and very lackluster. She had lost a lot of weight. Her breathing was labored, and I just was feeling very heavy-hearted. Your ad popped up as I was on Facebook, and I was reading it. I saw some of the comments, and I’m like, “Huh, that’s interesting. I think that looks like maybe it’s worth a try.”

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Arlene Bara:                  So I got it, and it came at a good time, because she was suffering again with some inflammation in her legs. It was so bad that I had a hard time getting her to come out of her stall. That’s how bad it was. I rubbed her down, and I put liniment on her and wrapped her up. I started her on this Equinety, and I’ll tell you what. After three days, that inflammation disappeared, and it hasn’t come back. She’s been on this Equinety now for, what we did we say, two months?

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, two months. But just backing up just a little bit here, so everything’s kind of hunky dory, business as usual every day. But she developed a cough. Then she tested positive for Lyme. Then she had pneumonia, and her allergy panel was everything allergic that you can think of.

Arlene Bara:                  Yep.

John Dowdy:                 It all just seemed to kind of hit over … What kind of a timeframe was this?

Arlene Bara:                  Well, this has gone now, I want to say, starting on the third year.

John Dowdy:                 Third year, okay. So you were doing the injections with the allergy serum for a year and a half. Did you see much of a difference with that at all?

Arlene Bara:                  I kind of thought maybe I did in the beginning, but after a year and a half, I was looking for a little bit more of a result, and I wasn’t getting it. I mean, I would saddle her up to ride her, and, at a walk, she’s fine, but as soon as I’d start to work her, she would start coughing.

So I was really, really discouraged and felt really, really bad for her. It was to the point, John, a couple of times, I’m thinking, “Winter’s coming. This horse just is suffering so much. It’s one thing after another. What do I do with this horse? I’m retired. My husband had a stroke. I have another horse. I can’t afford to keep throwing money at this horse that’s not going to get any better,” and I thought seriously a couple of times, John, of putting her down.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. I mean, and it’s something … In that scenario, it’s a logical thing to have to think about. So, fortunately, as you were saying, you came across the Equinety product. So you initially ordered 30 days’ worth, and when you received it, so you walk out and see that her legs were just super swollen. Then she also had some stroke or Bell’s palsy type of thing. Tell us about what happened there.

Arlene Bara:                  Yes. Well, I brought her in from the pasture one day, and her lip was hanging down. I’m thinking, “Huh, that’s a little weird.” I didn’t think too much more about it, because she’s kind of a lazy horse as it is, and sometimes those lazy horses, their lips hang down. But this was really hanging, and then I noticed her ear was drooping, too, and I never experienced that in my lifetime of having horses.

So, of course, I called the vet, and the vet came out. He said that he thought it was botulism and that I needed to go and get this special serum for her. There is also no test for botulism, he tells me. So here I was torn again. “Oh my gosh, she’s sick again. What if she does have botulism? What if she doesn’t have it? Do I take a chance that it’s not botulism?”

John Dowdy:                 Right.

Arlene Bara:                  So what do I do? At 11 o’clock at night, I pack up my husband. We drive into Jersey two hours away. One o’clock in the morning, we pick up the serum. We pay $1,000 for it. We come home and pay the vet to come the next morning and give it to her. The vet bills were crazy.

John Dowdy:                 Right.

Arlene Bara:                  Did all of that go away? No. So I don’t know. It was just another thing for this poor horse to go through, and, in my own research and whatnot, I’m thinking maybe it wasn’t botulism, it was Bell’s palsy or she had a stroke or something.

John Dowdy:                 So with all of this going on, you saw the add with our stuff on Facebook. You ordered the product, and it just so happened the legs were swollen. So you gave her the product. Three days, the swelling, completely gone.

Arlene Bara:                  Completely gone.

John Dowdy:                 The swelling hasn’t come back in … Well, it’s been 60 days now, a little over.

Arlene Bara:                  It has not. It has not come back. She is gaining weight. Her attitude is better. She’s eating her food better. Her ear’s coming back up. She seems to have better balance. She is running in the pasture now.

John Dowdy:                 How long has it been since you’ve seen her do that?

Arlene Bara:                  Months.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Since before.

Arlene Bara:                  Yeah.

John Dowdy:                 Wow.

Arlene Bara:                  Yeah. I mean, she would try to run, but it was sideways.

John Dowdy:                 Oh, goodness. Yeah, that is heartbreaking.

Arlene Bara:                  Yeah, it was very sad and very, very hard, emotionally, to watch, because she’s relatively still young.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Well, and I think it’s important to point out, for those tuning in for the first time, I mean, here we have a situation where you’ve had this horse for 11 years. You are doing every possible thing that you knew to do. Went through three different vets. Going up a big hill here, and it doesn’t seem like a whole lot is working in your favor, or her favor, rather. Needless say, you’re probably at your wit’s end.

We hear stories like this very, very often, and we’re blessed in the fact that we have a product that works so well, but I think it’s important. The Equinety product, it’s 100% pure amino acids. There’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches, and there’s no loading dose. A serving size is 5.2 grams, which is not quite a tablespoon. Just use it as a top dressing, and what these amino acids are specifically formulated to do is give the body what it needs to help heal itself at a cellular level by stimulating the pituitary gland. That’s what releases the hormones, and the body knows exactly where to send those hormones for the healing.

So is it a cure-all? Is it a miracle thing? No, it’s not any of those things. Used in combination with other things that you’re doing, it’s a dynamite combination. In this case, you were pretty much at your wit’s end. You had tried everything that was recommended to you by three different vets. Fortunately, you came across this product, and it did exactly what you were looking for. The horse is now well on its way to recovery. Have you been able to do any riding at this point, now that she’s coming back? Are you still …

Arlene Bara:                  Well, I think that she is rideable. I mean, I’ve been lunging her. My problem is the weather right now. We have almost a foot of snow, and I do not have an indoor arena. I have an outdoor arena. So the footing isn’t conducive to me riding her.

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Arlene Bara:                  I mean, I wouldn’t want her to slip or …

John Dowdy:                 Right.

Arlene Bara:                  … have any kind of a setback. But yes, I think that a moderate level of riding is quite possible.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Now, I know with Lyme, and you were telling me a little bit more about this, because since she has it, you’ve done your research on it, and it’s kind of one of those hidden things that can pop up here or there. It attacks the immune system, and that’s what you believe was causing the swelling, maybe not 100%, but that’s what you think that it was. Has there been any other things that have popped up from the Lyme that you know of?

Arlene Bara:                  No, she seems like she’s on the road to recovery, and it’s just a pleasure to see her, first thing in the morning, pop her head up and say good morning. It’s heartwarming.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. That’s great. Well, and I know we’ve had quite a few questions with people that have asked how this helps with Lyme. So I’m glad that we have you on here. Again, this is one situation. Not all situations might be the same. But from the few people that we have had feedback with with Lyme, this seems to really support and benefit that nasty disease, again.

Arlene Bara:                  Well, it attacks the immune system. So your product helps battle that.

John Dowdy:                 Yep. It definitely helps the immune system.

Arlene Bara:                  Yes. If the horse has a healthy immune system, when the Lyme comes out of dormacy and it wants to attack, it’s going to have a harder time, because the antibodies are there and ready to fight it.

John Dowdy:                 Right. Yep, absolutely. So, well, I tell you, I think the people tuning into this podcast, Arlene, are going to really appreciate your time on here, and maybe if they’re in a similar situation, that might give them some encouragement to give the product to try as well. If there’s anybody tuning in that might be a little bit still on the fence about whether they should try it or not, what advice would you have for them?

Arlene Bara:                  I would say give it a try. You’ve got nothing to lose. It’s so much less expensive than vet bills, and it’s all natural. You can’t go wrong.

John Dowdy:                 Yep. Again, we stress make sure you seek the advice of vets and all that kind of stuff. But, at the same time, this can be used along with any medications or anything that’s shown. I mean, they’re amino acids, building blocks of protein, so there’s no negative side effects, in that manner.

Arlene Bara:                  John, can I just add that the third vet that I consulted with was here after I started the Equinety, and I told her about the product. She was very receptive. She looked at the bottle. She wrote items down, and that impressed me, because not all vets are gung-ho to be receptive with certain supplements.

John Dowdy:                 Yes, I would agree with that. They’re sometimes a tough nut to crack, but we do have quite a few veterinarians that carry our product and carry it in their practice. So yeah, I guess it depends on their background and how open they are to things. So, well, Arlene from Pennsylvania, thank you so much for taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast.

Arlene Bara:                  Oh, you’re very welcome, and thank you, again, for the invite. I’m going to continue using your product.

John Dowdy:                 Awesome. Great. Well, thank you so much. Bye-bye.

Arlene Bara:                  All right. Bye-bye.

 

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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  -   Arlene Bara - Lymes Disease - Coughing - Pneumonia - Swelling - Allergies - Inflammation   -   - John Dowdy:                 Hello, and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're in for another exciting podcast this week.  <br /> <br />  <br /> Arlene Bara - Lymes Disease - Coughing -<br /> Pneumonia - Swelling - Allergies - Inflammation<br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello, and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're in for another exciting podcast this week. We're going to swing up into Pennsylvania and speak with Arlene Bara, who, well, let's just get right into this. An amazing story. So, without further ado, Arlene, welcome to the Equinety Podcast.<br /> <br /> Arlene Bara:                  John, good morning. I'm very excited to be a part of your podcast today. Thank you so much for inviting me.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Well, you're very welcome. It's great to have you. I believe I came across your comment on one of our Facebook ads, and I said to myself, "Oh, okay, I've got to get Arlene on this call," because, according to what you wrote, you are having some serious challenges with your 12-year-old. So let's first of all talk about this mare. What things were you dealing with prior to coming across the Equinety? So let's give a little background on her.<br /> <br /> Arlene Bara:                  Okay, John. Sure. I have a 12-year-old mare here. She's a registered solid paint roan. Beautiful little mare, and I've had her for 11 years. Within the last three years, she developed a cough, and, not being too alarmed, I didn't think too much about it, but then it got progressively worse.<br /> <br /> So, of course, I called the vet. Over the three-year period here, now I've had three different vets that I have consulted with. One said she has COPD. One says that she has allergies, which I started a series of serums for. She has so many different allergies that the serums just didn't seem to want to work. She had been tested positive for Lyme disease. We live in the mountains here, in the Poconos, and the ticks up here are pretty bad. So I guess it's inevitable, at some point. But she did test positive for Lyme, and I know that Lyme disease is one of those hidden sicknesses that can pop up in your immune system at any time and just do battle.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Sure.<br /> <br /> Arlene Bara:                  So she did come down with some pneumonia. She was treated for the pneumonia but, unfortunately, wasn't healed from it, and she carried that sickness for a couple months until, finally, the third vet that I had came and kind of knocked that out of her.<br /> <br /> But when I saw your ad, my mare was still coughing and very lackluster. She had lost a lot of weight. Her breathing was labored, and I just was feeling very heavy-hearted. Your ad popped up as I was on Facebook, and I was reading it. I saw some of the comments, and I'm like, "Huh, that's interesting. I think that looks like maybe it's worth a try."<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Sure.<br /> <br /> Arlene Bara:                  So I got it, and it came at a good time, because she was suffering again with some inflammation in her legs. It was so bad that I had a hard time getting her to come out of her stall. That's how bad it was. I rubbed her down, and I put liniment on her and wrapped her up. I started her on this Equinety, and I'll tell you what. After three days, that inflammation disappeared, and it hasn't come back. She's been on this Equinety now for, what we did we say, two months?<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yeah, two months. But just backing up just a little bit here, so everything's kind of hunky dory, business as usual every day. But she developed a cough. Then she tested positive for Lyme. Then she had pneumonia, and her allergy panel was everything allergic that you can think of.<br /> <br /> Arlene Bara:                  Yep.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 It all just seemed to kind of hit over ... What kind of a timeframe was this?<br /> <br /> Arlene Bara:                  Well, this has gone now, I want to say, John Dowdy clean 14:40
041 – Julie Klouda – Easy Keeper – Picky Eater – Mystery Lameness – Chronic Soreness – VERY Skeptical https://www.teamequinety.com/041-julie-klouda-easy-keeper-picky-eater-mystery-lameness-chronic-soreness-very-skeptical/ Wed, 11 Dec 2019 14:00:28 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1803   041 - Julie Klouda – Easy Keeper – Picky Eater - Mystery Lameness – Chronic Soreness – VERY Skeptical   John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Colorado this week and speak with Julie Klouda. Julie, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Julie Klouda:                 Thank you. John Dowdy:                 Great to have you on and we're excited because you, what was interesting, you had commented on one of our Facebook posts and you had mentioned that you had been in the pet nutrition industry for 20 years and you had an amazing experience with your horse. Let's talk a little bit about your background in pet nutrition, although it's not so much on the equine side but dogs and cats, but you're up to speed on nutrition. So let's talk a little bit about that, your experience there. Julie Klouda:                 Great, thank you. I actually started years ago in the rescue world, as many of us do and I had gotten into nutrition for them because in rescue you get so many who are either emaciated, they've got illnesses, diseases and I just wanted to help find better ways that were more natural, in helping them heal. And so I started my own company of delivering pet food and going to seminars to learn about how their body can heal from the inside out to provide pet optimum health. And from there I had that business for about five or six years, sold it and became a representative for a pet food distribution company. And then shortly after that I dabbled in becoming a manufacturer rep for, actually all the way up until about a month ago, so that was probably a good 10 plus years of visiting stores and teaching them about proper nutrition supplements and things like that. And now I'm just taking a break and spending some time with some family while I decide what the next area is in the pet world for me. John Dowdy:                 Sure. That's great. Now you have a horse that you've had for a couple of years and tell us about this eight year old Peruvian. Julie Klouda:                 Rose is great, like you mentioned, she's an eight year old Peruvian girl. I got her from a friend in California almost two years ago actually. And she's mostly trail, we do a little bit of show. And I would say it was earlier this year, probably around February, she had a right front leg issue where she was not stepping out nicely. So we tried multiple different things. We did some rehab, acupuncture, chiropractic. And then we healed from that and then in May we had a fall and ever since that particular fall, her front legs, just every day they were very sore and sometimes it was hard for her to get up or even to walk and and at eight years old, that's a really young age for them to have that type of daily soreness. And my heart just broke every time I'd go there and it would take sometimes an hour and a half just before she could actually walk around without looking painful. So I did some research, added in some additional joint care supplements, some CBD, plus her regular stuff that she had been on, which was either Mare Magic or Via-Calm in her oils and things. And we continued the chiropractic care and the acupuncture. John Dowdy:                 Yeah. And what was your vet telling you, were they able to find anything specific going on or what was their advice? Julie Klouda:                 We could not find anything specific, which was so frustrating about all of it, is that everything that we would do, nobody could pinpoint why this was happening other than maybe she has a little bit of arthritis or something after this particular fall, which I guess can happen, even if they don't break anything, they can get that early on. And even though testings and things like that, nothing showed that there was actually a particular problem with her. So we headed towards, well go ahead and ride her because there doesn't show anything wrong,

 

041 – Julie Klouda – Easy Keeper – Picky Eater –
Mystery Lameness – Chronic Soreness – VERY Skeptical

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We’re going to swing up into Colorado this week and speak with Julie Klouda. Julie, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Julie Klouda:                 Thank you.

John Dowdy:                 Great to have you on and we’re excited because you, what was interesting, you had commented on one of our Facebook posts and you had mentioned that you had been in the pet nutrition industry for 20 years and you had an amazing experience with your horse. Let’s talk a little bit about your background in pet nutrition, although it’s not so much on the equine side but dogs and cats, but you’re up to speed on nutrition. So let’s talk a little bit about that, your experience there.

Julie Klouda:                 Great, thank you. I actually started years ago in the rescue world, as many of us do and I had gotten into nutrition for them because in rescue you get so many who are either emaciated, they’ve got illnesses, diseases and I just wanted to help find better ways that were more natural, in helping them heal. And so I started my own company of delivering pet food and going to seminars to learn about how their body can heal from the inside out to provide pet optimum health. And from there I had that business for about five or six years, sold it and became a representative for a pet food distribution company. And then shortly after that I dabbled in becoming a manufacturer rep for, actually all the way up until about a month ago, so that was probably a good 10 plus years of visiting stores and teaching them about proper nutrition supplements and things like that. And now I’m just taking a break and spending some time with some family while I decide what the next area is in the pet world for me.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. That’s great. Now you have a horse that you’ve had for a couple of years and tell us about this eight year old Peruvian.

Julie Klouda:                 Rose is great, like you mentioned, she’s an eight year old Peruvian girl. I got her from a friend in California almost two years ago actually. And she’s mostly trail, we do a little bit of show. And I would say it was earlier this year, probably around February, she had a right front leg issue where she was not stepping out nicely. So we tried multiple different things. We did some rehab, acupuncture, chiropractic. And then we healed from that and then in May we had a fall and ever since that particular fall, her front legs, just every day they were very sore and sometimes it was hard for her to get up or even to walk and and at eight years old, that’s a really young age for them to have that type of daily soreness.

And my heart just broke every time I’d go there and it would take sometimes an hour and a half just before she could actually walk around without looking painful. So I did some research, added in some additional joint care supplements, some CBD, plus her regular stuff that she had been on, which was either Mare Magic or Via-Calm in her oils and things. And we continued the chiropractic care and the acupuncture.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. And what was your vet telling you, were they able to find anything specific going on or what was their advice?

Julie Klouda:                 We could not find anything specific, which was so frustrating about all of it, is that everything that we would do, nobody could pinpoint why this was happening other than maybe she has a little bit of arthritis or something after this particular fall, which I guess can happen, even if they don’t break anything, they can get that early on. And even though testings and things like that, nothing showed that there was actually a particular problem with her. So we headed towards, well go ahead and ride her because there doesn’t show anything wrong, but I just would choose to ride her after she was warmed up, when she wasn’t showing any more pain for the day anyway. And then the next day she would be somewhat sore, so I would increase the CBD and her joint care actually to see if that would help, maybe she was the type of horse who needs a double dose.

And that showed to be slightly beneficial but not enough on a regular basis. So in, I guess it was probably September, I want to say somewhere right around there, that we talked about what other options there were to help her in the mornings because she was just like a little old lady every single morning. And we talked about Pentosan injections and I really didn’t want to have to go to the injection route if I didn’t need to, but I was willing to just for her comfort. And so I did some research and just looking at horse stuff, ads come up on Facebook and I saw yours and I’m not normally one who is going to bite on a Facebook ad, but after reading all the comments.

John Dowdy:                 Tell us about your true reaction to the Facebook ad.

Julie Klouda:                 Yeah, my true reaction was this was a gimmick and just really, why would I do this? And I was like, “You know what, what do I have to lose? What do we have to lose? I can buy a small bottle, they guarantee the product. So it’s totally fine, I’ll just give it a try.” So I happened to be at one of the stores nearby, I think it was the Colorado Tack store, and they happened to have it in there too. And I asked them about it because I was right about to order it and she said that they had just gotten it in about a week or so prior. So they had just started their horses on it but didn’t have enough basis to recommend or not recommend it at the time. And I was like, “Well, I guess I’ve seen it all over Facebook, I might as well buy it.” So there I go, I dove into the gimmick.

I’m really pleased it is not a gimmick. This product is absolutely phenomenal and I started to see results within the first two weeks. Albeit slight, but I could see a difference. And I’m the type of person that if I see an improvement, even the slightest, I will continue that product to see if I will get even better results. Well then two weeks later I could see even more results. So now we’re a month in, I’ve used two jars of the small and at this stage I figured, well I might as well just buy a big jar and give it a solid try.

So we did that and there was a couple of days where I switched up her feed oil and she didn’t eat and so it was about three days in, she didn’t feed with the Equinety in it, plus all her other stuff. And of course we started to see her be sore again and so I immediately went back to her old feed regimen and she started to improve again. So even missing those couple of days I could tell a difference that the Equinety was working and it just proved to me that this product, it does everything that it says it will do. So she’s not sore in the mornings anymore. She’s maintaining her weight really, really well. Not that we had too much of a weight issue with her, she was at a perfect weight, but she can be hard to maintain weight because she’s such an easy to keeper.

And so we’ve seen that happen. And then the other thing that I’ve seen is really all those additional amino acids that are in there really help with the overall temperament and disposition. I had been giving CBD and like I said, either mere magic or Via-Calm in addition, to basically, she’s not a high strung horse, although mares can just be funny, just on occasion. And she occasionally would be funny, so I just would use those as a daily, just level out any potential skittishness or jumpiness and things like that. And I actually have since, probably in the last 30 to 45 days, have cut out the CBD and any Mare Magic or Via-Calm because the Equinety is working so well in that area as well. So it’s really been a great addition for overall health for her, added to her hay pellets and her oils.

John Dowdy:                 Right. And with you having a background in nutrition, I mean you are educated on the power of amino acids and I mean so it’s not like you were really going in blind per se, but when you’ve tried a lot of other things and the CBD is your go to, to be able to cut that out and the Mare Magic and lots of other things, that’s pretty impressive.

Julie Klouda:                 It is very impressive. And I would have never thought that buying something just randomly off Facebook would make me a believer.

John Dowdy:                 Yes. Well we have converted a lot of skeptics over the years and I love the skeptics. But yeah, we’re blessed. I mean it is an amazing product and if you’re tuning in for the first time, what this product is and why it works so well, first of all, it’s 100% pure amino acids. There is no fillers, there’s no sugars, no starches, there’s no loading dose. And a serving size is 5.2 grams, which is not quite a tablespoon. Which by the way, were you shocked to see how little that was when you purchased the tub?

Julie Klouda:                 At first I was, and then I thought back to some of the other products we use for either her or my household. And when you’re using a high quality product, you don’t need as much to see the benefit. And that’s one thing that I really like about your product is you don’t need a lot in order for you to see the results.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. And how has the, this is a leading question here, but how has the palatability? I ask because every now and then we’ll say, “Hey my horse is a picky eater.” How does your horse eat it up?

Julie Klouda:                 She does great and she is actually probably one of the finickiest horses out there. Like I said, just even changing her oil made her not eat for three days. So, it’s not an issue. I don’t think it has any flavor at all. I actually haven’t tried it myself yet, but I have used it for another pet in our home too, which palatability was just fine. It doesn’t even smell like it has a flavor.

John Dowdy:                 No there is no additional or added flavors or anything like that. It’s 100% raw crystallized amino acids and they’re kind of salty by nature, so that’s probably why they tend to lick it right up. But now getting into the the science of what this product is actually doing because again, I think this is podcast number 41 that will be published. So if you go back and listen to any of the other podcast, there’s a smorgasbord of different issues that this product has helped with.

But what it’s actually doing is stimulating the pituitary gland, which is about the size of a pea. And that’s why they all get the same scoop, it’s not based on the size of the animal, but based on the size of the pituitary gland. And that’s what releases the necessary hormones, which then help heal at a cellular level. So that’s why this can do so many different things for so many different horses because you’re helping and giving the body what it needs to heal from a cellular level. And I think the other thing to stress here is, well, with your background in nutrition, you are doing everything that you knew, you’re working with a veterinarian, a chiropractor. Were you doing massage or were you just doing … what other stuff were you trying to do care wise?

Julie Klouda:                 We did the acupuncture. Yeah, I did not do massage with her.

John Dowdy:                 Okay. No, but I mean I think the thing to stress here is you were using everything that you thought that you needed to do and using professionals and supplements and with your background and it just wasn’t bringing this horse to where it needed to be. And that’s one of the things I stress with those looking at the Equinety product, it’s not the end all be all, it’s not a miracle supplement. But when you add this to the things that you’re already doing, if you’re doing the best things that you can for your horse, then it just amplifies everything. And going back to when you switched the oil or the feed with your horse and she didn’t eat for those two or three days and she regressed and went back to being lame, the reason why that’s happening is because the hormones that are released in the body have a 23 and a half hour life cycle.

So if you stop giving the product, then the hormone levels go back to the way they were before you started giving the product. And then what you found at day three when you started the product again, then she went back to being sound. So it’s very interesting. We have a lot of people that the question is, “Hey, do I just feed this product till my horses better and then do I stop or is it a lifelong type of a product?” Well, it is a lifelong type of a product and I think you’ll find that once you start trying the product and see the results, you probably don’t want to stop because the horses, they’re happier, healthier, they feel good. So I know it’s probably in the wintertime now up there, well I guess it is winter time, so you’re probably not riding as much or you have an indoor place to ride?

Julie Klouda:                 We don’t have an indoor, but we still ride outside. It’s nice here in Colorado.

John Dowdy:                 Yes, well it is heaven up there.

Julie Klouda:                 Yeah, just in the last week or two we haven’t been able to ride because of the snow, but other than that we ride probably, we try to ride two to four times a week, generally five to eight miles, 10 miles a ride.

John Dowdy:                 Wow. And she’s just been sound ever since the six week mark, huh?

Julie Klouda:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative).

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. That’s great. That is fantastic. Wow.

Julie Klouda:                 I couldn’t be more pleased.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Well that’s amazing. And that’s why we love hearing these stories. And I tell you what, if there’s anybody listening in for the first time that might be as skeptical as you were, what advice would you have to give them?

Julie Klouda:                 My advice would be to actually just give the product a valid try. And by that I mean a minimum of 30 days, ideally 90 because I think that every pet horse is different in how quickly you’re going to see the results. But also depending on what your ultimately trying to heal or see, if it’s a healthy horse, I would actually advise using it for even a horse who doesn’t have issues. So because they do miss out on some of those amino acids with their feed, I mean we we’re trained to feel like they aren’t missing out in that even if you give a complete feed, but they really are because like you and I were talking earlier, that it cooks out. So to me, it doesn’t matter what age your horse is, the condition of your horse. But I would highly encourage everybody to give this product a try.

John Dowdy:                 Great. I couldn’t have said that better, but it’s always nice to hear it from someone else other than me. But yeah, that’s great. Well, I really appreciate you taking the time to share your story, and I’m sure there’s going to be a lot of people that get a lot of benefit out of that. So Julie Klouda out of Colorado, thank you so much for taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast.

Julie Klouda:                 Thank you, John for having me.

John Dowdy:                 You bet. Bye bye.

 

 

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  041 - Julie Klouda – Easy Keeper – Picky Eater - Mystery Lameness – Chronic Soreness – VERY Skeptical   - John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Colorado this week and speak...  <br /> <br /> <br /> 041 - Julie Klouda – Easy Keeper – Picky Eater -<br /> Mystery Lameness – Chronic Soreness – VERY Skeptical<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We're going to swing up into Colorado this week and speak with Julie Klouda. Julie, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Julie Klouda:                 Thank you.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Great to have you on and we're excited because you, what was interesting, you had commented on one of our Facebook posts and you had mentioned that you had been in the pet nutrition industry for 20 years and you had an amazing experience with your horse. Let's talk a little bit about your background in pet nutrition, although it's not so much on the equine side but dogs and cats, but you're up to speed on nutrition. So let's talk a little bit about that, your experience there.<br /> <br /> Julie Klouda:                 Great, thank you. I actually started years ago in the rescue world, as many of us do and I had gotten into nutrition for them because in rescue you get so many who are either emaciated, they've got illnesses, diseases and I just wanted to help find better ways that were more natural, in helping them heal. And so I started my own company of delivering pet food and going to seminars to learn about how their body can heal from the inside out to provide pet optimum health. And from there I had that business for about five or six years, sold it and became a representative for a pet food distribution company. And then shortly after that I dabbled in becoming a manufacturer rep for, actually all the way up until about a month ago, so that was probably a good 10 plus years of visiting stores and teaching them about proper nutrition supplements and things like that. And now I'm just taking a break and spending some time with some family while I decide what the next area is in the pet world for me.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Sure. That's great. Now you have a horse that you've had for a couple of years and tell us about this eight year old Peruvian.<br /> <br /> Julie Klouda:                 Rose is great, like you mentioned, she's an eight year old Peruvian girl. I got her from a friend in California almost two years ago actually. And she's mostly trail, we do a little bit of show. And I would say it was earlier this year, probably around February, she had a right front leg issue where she was not stepping out nicely. So we tried multiple different things. We did some rehab, acupuncture, chiropractic. And then we healed from that and then in May we had a fall and ever since that particular fall, her front legs, just every day they were very sore and sometimes it was hard for her to get up or even to walk and and at eight years old, that's a really young age for them to have that type of daily soreness.<br /> <br /> And my heart just broke every time I'd go there and it would take sometimes an hour and a half just before she could actually walk around without looking painful. So I did some research, added in some additional joint care supplements, some CBD, plus her regular stuff that she had been on, which was either Mare Magic or Via-Calm in her oils and things. And we continued the chiropractic care and the acupuncture.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yeah. And what was your vet telling you, were they able to find anything specific going on or what was their advice?<br /> <br /> Julie Klouda:                 We could not find anything specific, which was so frustrating about all of it, is that everything that we would do, nobody could pinpoint why this was happening other than maybe she has a little bit of arthritis or something after this particular fall, which I guess can happen, even if they don't break anything, they can get that early on. And even though testings and things like that, nothing showed that there was actually a particu... John Dowdy clean 19:01
040 – Lauri Oliphant – Weight Loss – white line, thrush, grew frog, stronger hoof, new sole depth https://www.teamequinety.com/040-lauri-oliphant-weight-loss-white-line-thrush-grew-frog-stronger-hoof-new-sole-depth/ Wed, 04 Dec 2019 14:00:19 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1799   Lauri Oliphant - Weight Loss - white line, thrush, grew frog, stronger hoof, new sole depth   John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're going to swing up into Pennsylvania and speak with Laurie Oliphant. She's got a 21 year-old that's got some seedy toe, white line thrush, some other issues going on. Without further ado, Laurie, welcome to the Equinety Podcast. Laurie Oliphant:            Hi, glad to be here. John Dowdy:                 Great. We're excited to have you. So let's jump right into this. You've got a 21 year-old that you've had since she was eight, give us a little bit of history. What was going on? I know you told me that she had been bred a few times, but tell me some of the issues that were kind of going on with her and what you were trying to help her with. Laurie Oliphant:            Her feet was the big issue. She had foundered when she was five. I've had her since she was eight months old and it was a stone bruise that caused the issue. We had a fantastic blacksmith that for six months, we worked and worked and worked and worked. Everybody kept telling me, "Oh, you ought to put her down. You ought to put her down." I said, "Nope." I said, "There's life in this horse and she wants to live." Laurie Oliphant:            We got her feet fixed and she was doing really good, watched her diet and finally got around to breeding her. She had her first foal, no issues. Weight was easy to get back up on her with no problem, then four years later went to go breed her again, and her weight just plummeted and I've had a hard time since then. She's now 21, keeping weight on her, keeping her feet sound. Tried other products, faithfully, that other people swore by. They worked for a while and then they just quit working, no matter what I did, and blacksmith issues, so it was a hard time keeping a good blacksmith. The last time she'd had her baby, we'd fought with her feet. I found a good blacksmith that helped me out, but we were still having issues and I tried different products that would supposedly help. Added stuff to her feed to try to help her feet out. They'd help for a while and then nothing, we were back to square one again. Laurie Oliphant:            This last time she was losing weight and I was trying to get her to gain some weight. Changed her feed around and got her teeth floated. She'd been wormed, got her teeth floated and she still wasn't picking up the weight the way she should. Shoulders were sinking in, muscles around her, [inaudible 00:02:40] were sinking in. Top line was starting to show out [inaudible 00:02:47] found this Spirit medicine. This is not doable, this is not you. Read up on your product, picked out other aspects of your product, read some testimonials, heard some testimonials and so what do I have to lose, except my one year-old best buddy? John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative). Laurie Oliphant:            I gotta try. So I started that. She'd had her teeth done a week before we got the product, did more of a diet change according to her dentist to help her out. Tried all kinds of products that usually worked short term then just would quit. She was having [inaudible 00:03:22] I was battling with [inaudible 00:03:24] oxy thing, soaking her feet. I'm doing everything and I just read about your products, went and read the testimonials and all that jazz and I wanted to look up what these amino acids would actually do and how they correlated [inaudible 00:03:47] University library, but I was reading there and I said, "what do I have to do lose"? So I ordered it up. Four weeks in, my blacksmith was dumbfounded. He couldn't believe the growth in a few weeks and I was tickled pink. Unfortunately, dumb me didn't take a picture before and after because I was busy trying to get some other stuff done? John Dowdy:                 Yeah, well you know what we hear a lot people say, "Oh my gosh,

 

Lauri Oliphant – Weight Loss – white line, thrush,
grew frog, stronger hoof, new sole depth

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety Podcast. We’re going to swing up into Pennsylvania and speak with Laurie Oliphant. She’s got a 21 year-old that’s got some seedy toe, white line thrush, some other issues going on. Without further ado, Laurie, welcome to the Equinety Podcast.

Laurie Oliphant:            Hi, glad to be here.

John Dowdy:                 Great. We’re excited to have you. So let’s jump right into this. You’ve got a 21 year-old that you’ve had since she was eight, give us a little bit of history. What was going on? I know you told me that she had been bred a few times, but tell me some of the issues that were kind of going on with her and what you were trying to help her with.

Laurie Oliphant:            Her feet was the big issue. She had foundered when she was five. I’ve had her since she was eight months old and it was a stone bruise that caused the issue. We had a fantastic blacksmith that for six months, we worked and worked and worked and worked. Everybody kept telling me, “Oh, you ought to put her down. You ought to put her down.” I said, “Nope.” I said, “There’s life in this horse and she wants to live.”

Laurie Oliphant:            We got her feet fixed and she was doing really good, watched her diet and finally got around to breeding her. She had her first foal, no issues. Weight was easy to get back up on her with no problem, then four years later went to go breed her again, and her weight just plummeted and I’ve had a hard time since then. She’s now 21, keeping weight on her, keeping her feet sound. Tried other products, faithfully, that other people swore by. They worked for a while and then they just quit working, no matter what I did, and blacksmith issues, so it was a hard time keeping a good blacksmith. The last time she’d had her baby, we’d fought with her feet. I found a good blacksmith that helped me out, but we were still having issues and I tried different products that would supposedly help. Added stuff to her feed to try to help her feet out. They’d help for a while and then nothing, we were back to square one again.

Laurie Oliphant:            This last time she was losing weight and I was trying to get her to gain some weight. Changed her feed around and got her teeth floated. She’d been wormed, got her teeth floated and she still wasn’t picking up the weight the way she should. Shoulders were sinking in, muscles around her, [inaudible 00:02:40] were sinking in. Top line was starting to show out [inaudible 00:02:47] found this Spirit medicine. This is not doable, this is not you. Read up on your product, picked out other aspects of your product, read some testimonials, heard some testimonials and so what do I have to lose, except my one year-old best buddy?

John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Laurie Oliphant:            I gotta try. So I started that. She’d had her teeth done a week before we got the product, did more of a diet change according to her dentist to help her out. Tried all kinds of products that usually worked short term then just would quit. She was having [inaudible 00:03:22] I was battling with [inaudible 00:03:24] oxy thing, soaking her feet. I’m doing everything and I just read about your products, went and read the testimonials and all that jazz and I wanted to look up what these amino acids would actually do and how they correlated [inaudible 00:03:47] University library, but I was reading there and I said, “what do I have to do lose”? So I ordered it up. Four weeks in, my blacksmith was dumbfounded. He couldn’t believe the growth in a few weeks and I was tickled pink. Unfortunately, dumb me didn’t take a picture before and after because I was busy trying to get some other stuff done?

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, well you know what we hear a lot people say, “Oh my gosh, I should have taken pictures” and I think a lot of times people don’t have a lot of high expectations because they’ve tried a lot of other things just like yourself and you know with your attitude, which is similar to a lot of people, you know, what do you have to lose? You’ve tried everything else. Why not try the Equinety product?

Laurie Oliphant:            Like I said, I was dumbfounded over her feet. Oh my gosh, and the weight that she had picked up.

John Dowdy:                 So it helped fill out? It helped fill out top line, put the weight back on her?

Laurie Oliphant:            It’s filled out her top line. She’s not completely filled out yet, but those amino acids have so many issues to work on. I can’t expect it.

John Dowdy:                 (Laughing) Yeah.

Laurie Oliphant:            I can’t expect the poopy horse, you know, in nine weeks.

John Dowdy:                 Well, I think the transformations though, we’re going on close to two months now, so if you’re tuning in for the first time, just a little recap. So we’re dealing with a 21 year old that had lost a lot of weight and you were having issues getting this weight back on. You’d tried a lot of different things and although it would work temporarily, it just didn’t seem to do what you were looking for. While the weight loss was going on, she also developed white line thrush. But, you came across our product, the Equinety product, and for those of you who are tuning in for the first time and are not sure what this product is.

John Dowdy:                 The Equinety Horse excels 100% pure amino acids and what they’re specifically formulated to do is stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body and that’s what releases the necessary hormones, which then help heal at a cellular level. So, this is why it can help do so many different things in a relatively short amount of time. You made the comment that there’s a lot of things going on with your horse, so I would say within two months the transformation has been quite dramatic. Tell us about the growth of the hoof. What all did you see there?

Laurie Oliphant:            I’d say she had grown in that short amount of time, at least a quarter inch off of her coronary band. Her sole was actually thickened up enough that we could have cut out the rest of the seedy toe but I didn’t want to take her down to where she’d be ouchy over the hard ground, cause it’s getting winter time.

John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Laurie Oliphant:            So we left her with, you know, a little bit left on that issue.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. You’d also noticed some new frog growth.

Laurie Oliphant:            Oh my gosh, I’ve never seen such big fat frogs on her.

John Dowdy:                 Wow. Yep. Well, I tell ya, using this combination with a good farrier blacksmith that’s doing the proper trimming, this works really, really well just by itself. But, in combination with doing things a proper way and you know, I like the fact that you’ve chosen not to go ahead and have the rest of that dug out cause it will grow out and we hear this all the time. That’s fantastic.[crosstalk 00:00:07:25]

Laurie Oliphant:            You know it would be totally different if we had way too much toe and could take that down.

John Dowdy:                 Right.

Laurie Oliphant:            Put that out. But she didn’t have, in fact her feet are looking like a horse’s feet better.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Yeah. And you said that her spirits back and now she’s kind of the leader of the pack again, huh?

Laurie Oliphant:            Yep. Well, she’s got her firstborn here and Maggie, I got it one month old. No, I didn’t take her away from her mother, I bought her when she was a baby. That’s been her surrogate baby until she had her own. Then Maggie has her firstborn here. So needless to say, Abby has taken it upon herself to be the boss, mayor of the herd.

John Dowdy:                 Gotcha. Then with, with her son, he’s been on product now for about four weeks and he was also having some hoof issues.

Laurie Oliphant:            This was only four weeks in on him because I noticed her changes and noticed that things were filling out on her and her feet were looking a little better, and I’m going, “Hmm”. So I started him on it and he’d only been on it for like four weeks, almost four weeks and he had frog that he’s never had before. I thought about changing his name to Froggy.

John Dowdy:                 (Laughing) That much, huh?

Laurie Oliphant:            Oh really.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah.

Laurie Oliphant:            His white line is where Abby’s was over a month ago where we could have cut it out, but it would have changed his angle too much and it would have made him too tender footed for the winter, you know, the winter ground coming on.

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Laurie Oliphant:            So, I didn’t want him to go that far and it was too much of an angle change, which puts stresses on.

John Dowdy:                 Right.

Laurie Oliphant:            He gets touchy now and again whenever he does something stupid out in the field with his shoulder. I watched him rip and tear and he did a slider and I’m like, “Oh God, here we go”. Break out the butte again, and no, nothing. He’s been stepping right out looking bright eyed and bushy tailed.

John Dowdy:                 Nice. Yep.

Laurie Oliphant:            I had no clue. I mean he doesn’t need the weight. Lord knows he don’t need to wait. He just needs the feet time.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Now here’s another interesting point, since you brought it up. So you’ve got the one horse that needed weight, your other horse does not need the weight. They both have hoof issues going on. So although you’ve tried lots of other things that may have worked for a very short amount of time, the one thing that has worked, you know, going on now two months on the one horse, and a month on the other one, it has added weight to the horse that needed weight added to it, and the other horse it has not added weight to because that horse doesn’t need weight. While at the same time it’s improved both of the hoof quality, for both of them.

Laurie Oliphant:            Definitely.

John Dowdy:                 Yep.

Laurie Oliphant:            Definitely.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah.

Laurie Oliphant:            Which, that’s why I was skeptical at first because so many of your testimonies, the horse has had major weight issues because they were rescues and the side benefit was the feet. I went, “Well, from all I’m reading, it says that the body will know what the body needs and take, take it to where the body needs it”.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, that’s right. Yeah. So the hormones that are released within the body, the body sends those hormones to the places that need healing. So, it could be weight gain or it could not be weight gain cause here’s a prime example of one horse that needs weight, the other one doesn’t, so it’s going to add weight to the one.

John Dowdy:                 I think over time what you’ll find, especially if the one is a little overweight, it’ll help balance that horse. But ultimately what it’s doing, it’s balancing the horses from the inside out. So, it’s going to the problem areas and it’s customizing to each one. We’ve done several podcasts now where we’ve had some people that have five, six, seven different horses with all kinds of different issues and its customizing to each one, which you know, we’re blessed to have a product that helps in so many different ways. It’s pretty amazing. It’s another reason why we started the podcast, so we could hear from horse owners, just like yourself, that may have tried everything under the sun and now here you came across the Equinety and may be a bit skeptical, and now you’re sharing your story as to why you spread the word about it.

Laurie Oliphant:            I am so pleased with the product, that for Christmas I’m getting two more containers for Abby and Arthur. Maddie could probably use it, she’s the youngest one.

John Dowdy:                 Yep.

Laurie Oliphant:            But, I’ve got a 15 hand half linger that out eats, out does everything, and is a butterball. She doesn’t have a foot problem.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Well I’ll tell you Lori, if there’s anybody tuning in to this podcast for the first time and they might be on the fence, maybe a little skeptical about trying the Equinety. What advice would you have for them?

Laurie Oliphant:            I was on the fence about it. That’s why I kind of questioned you. I think it might have been you over the product and I said, “well what do I’ve got to lose, except my 21 year old friend? She needs help”. So, I’m sold on the product, I’m going to try to get two more containers cause I’m gonna be running out probably here before the end of next month. So, I’m going to go ahead and order it in.

John Dowdy:                 Right.

Laurie Oliphant:            I’m just astounded. In fact, people that I hear when we’re in the feed store and they’re having issues with trying to get weight on and they’re trying to read which feed bag’s gonna help them out, I tell them about your product. I said, “I’m sold, I’m sold”. I said, “It has good science behind it. It’s not one of these products that’ll help for a while, then quit. If the horse has an issue, it’ll continue to help with that issue”.

John Dowdy:                 Right. I think it’s important to mention all along that same topic, even if you have a high performance horse or just a horse in general that doesn’t have any issues at all, sometimes the question is, “Well, how can this product still help my horse”? Well, what it’s ultimately doing, because we’re giving the body what it needs to release hormones that help heal at a cellular level, it’s getting those cells to operate and work at their optimal level so the horses are happier, they’re healthier. If it’s a working horse that doesn’t really have any issues, it’s going to help with recovery and stamina and focus and keeping your horse on the product through the winter, we’ve also found that their hooves stay nice and healthy through the winter. The weight stays on through the winter, and for the performance horse or working horse, they’re back in shape a lot quicker.

John Dowdy:                 You know, if you’re live in a super cold climate and you kind of put the horse up for the winter, when you bring them back out in the spring, they seem to be back in shape a lot faster. So, those are some of the other benefits of giving the product to your horse that didn’t really have any known issues, but just helps keep them healthier and happier.

Laurie Oliphant:            I must have taken my pony out for a good long ride in the woods and just didn’t dare because of the way her feet were. But, he was getting down in spirit because we weren’t going out. So, if her feet weren’t too God awful bad, we’d just tool around the farm and out to the fields and that would make her bright eyed and bushy tailed looking like a boiled dow and she was happy again. But it’s like, girl, we got to do something.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, well maybe as you get through the winter here and into the spring, you’ll be able to makeup for all the lost riding.

Laurie Oliphant:            Tell people out there, it does work. I was giving up hope on trying to find something and you guys saved my pony.

John Dowdy:                 Oh, that’s great to hear. We are blessed for sure. Absolutely. Well, Laurie, thank you so much. I appreciate your time and thank you so much for being a guest here on the Equinety podcast.

Laurie Oliphant:            Thank you for having me. Yes, it does work folks.

John Dowdy:                 All right, thanks so much. Bye bye.

Laurie Oliphant:            Bye bye.

 

 

 

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  Lauri Oliphant - Weight Loss - white line, thrush, grew frog, stronger hoof, new sole depth   - John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're going to swing up into Pennsylvania and speak with Laurie Oli...  <br /> <br /> <br /> Lauri Oliphant - Weight Loss - white line, thrush,<br /> grew frog, stronger hoof, new sole depth<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety Podcast. We're going to swing up into Pennsylvania and speak with Laurie Oliphant. She's got a 21 year-old that's got some seedy toe, white line thrush, some other issues going on. Without further ado, Laurie, welcome to the Equinety Podcast.<br /> <br /> Laurie Oliphant:            Hi, glad to be here.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Great. We're excited to have you. So let's jump right into this. You've got a 21 year-old that you've had since she was eight, give us a little bit of history. What was going on? I know you told me that she had been bred a few times, but tell me some of the issues that were kind of going on with her and what you were trying to help her with.<br /> <br /> Laurie Oliphant:            Her feet was the big issue. She had foundered when she was five. I've had her since she was eight months old and it was a stone bruise that caused the issue. We had a fantastic blacksmith that for six months, we worked and worked and worked and worked. Everybody kept telling me, "Oh, you ought to put her down. You ought to put her down." I said, "Nope." I said, "There's life in this horse and she wants to live."<br /> <br /> Laurie Oliphant:            We got her feet fixed and she was doing really good, watched her diet and finally got around to breeding her. She had her first foal, no issues. Weight was easy to get back up on her with no problem, then four years later went to go breed her again, and her weight just plummeted and I've had a hard time since then. She's now 21, keeping weight on her, keeping her feet sound. Tried other products, faithfully, that other people swore by. They worked for a while and then they just quit working, no matter what I did, and blacksmith issues, so it was a hard time keeping a good blacksmith. The last time she'd had her baby, we'd fought with her feet. I found a good blacksmith that helped me out, but we were still having issues and I tried different products that would supposedly help. Added stuff to her feed to try to help her feet out. They'd help for a while and then nothing, we were back to square one again.<br /> <br /> Laurie Oliphant:            This last time she was losing weight and I was trying to get her to gain some weight. Changed her feed around and got her teeth floated. She'd been wormed, got her teeth floated and she still wasn't picking up the weight the way she should. Shoulders were sinking in, muscles around her, [inaudible 00:02:40] were sinking in. Top line was starting to show out [inaudible 00:02:47] found this Spirit medicine. This is not doable, this is not you. Read up on your product, picked out other aspects of your product, read some testimonials, heard some testimonials and so what do I have to lose, except my one year-old best buddy?<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative).<br /> <br /> Laurie Oliphant:            I gotta try. So I started that. She'd had her teeth done a week before we got the product, did more of a diet change according to her dentist to help her out. Tried all kinds of products that usually worked short term then just would quit. She was having [inaudible 00:03:22] I was battling with [inaudible 00:03:24] oxy thing, soaking her feet. I'm doing everything and I just read about your products, went and read the testimonials and all that jazz and I wanted to look up what these amino acids would actually do and how they correlated [inaudible 00:03:47] University library, but I was reading there and I said, "what do I have to do lose"? So I ordered it up. Four weeks in, my blacksmith was dumbfounded. He couldn't believe the growth in a few weeks and I was tickled pink. Unfortunately, dumb me didn't take a picture before and after because I was busy trying to get some oth... John Dowdy clean 16:31
039- Terri Dinubilo Murray – Blown Tendon, Abscess, Hoof Growth, Shiny Coat, Life is back – Health Happy Horse https://www.teamequinety.com/039-terri-dinubilo-murray-blown-tendon-abscess-hoof-growth-shiny-coat-life-is-back-health-happy-horse/ Wed, 27 Nov 2019 14:00:19 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1793   Terri Dinubilo Murray - Blown Tendon, Abscess, Hoof Growth, Shiny Coat, Life is back - Health Happy Horse John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We are going to swing way out West. That's out West for me since I'm in Florida. We're going to go out to Oahu, Hawaii, and we've got Terry Murray on the Equinety podcast this week. Terry, welcome to the call. Terri Murray:    Thank you. I'm glad to be here. I'm very eager to share my testimony about this wonderful product. John Dowdy:     Well, that's great. We're glad to have you. And let's start off talking about your horse. Just from our pre-call, you had brought this horse in from the mainland, and for those of you on the mainland, that's us on the big, big island of the United States. You're out there on the island by itself. So you brought this horse in from where in the States? Terri Murray:    This horse came from the Cascade Range of Washington. John Dowdy:     Okay, so this was about in 2006-ish timeframe? Terri Murray:    Yes. John Dowdy:     Okay. Terri Murray:    She actually came to us in the January of 2006, yes. John Dowdy:     Got you. So before you brought it over, she was vet checked, and the vet that checked her out said she had a bit of stifle issues. But when you got her there on the island, what did your local vet... what was his take on what was going on? Terri Murray:    With the stifle issue that she had, it wasn't very prevalent, and he basically said with conditioning and exercise that that would help reduce any type of stifle inadequacies where she's unable to move. It would help that. John Dowdy:     So you kind of just started off doing some conditioning and trying to get her in shape and things like that? Terri Murray:    Yeah. So what we did was a friend of ours had a cattle ranch, and so we went and boarded her there for a couple of months and just had fun with her moving cows. She was stalled. She had some pasture time. We'd work with her on a daily basis, slowly bringing her up to a good healthy condition. John Dowdy:     Sure. And then, you got the itch like most horse people do. And so you started doing some training; so, what were you training her to do at this point? Terri Murray:    Okay, so I met somebody here that was alongside the vet. She was an assistant and she kept encouraging me to show Winnie. She had a lot of eye appeal and was a looker. And so shortly after, maybe about, I want to say, Oh, about two years later, I met a gal that was willing to coach me and teach me how to ride and get ready for the Western Pleasure show that was short- lived here in Hawaii. But we showed in both the Equine Class and the Western Pleasure, and at times, the trail course. John Dowdy:     And being a novice rider getting into that, I hear you did very well one year. Terri Murray:    One year we did take the novice championship, and so, that was really exciting. It was exciting to meet other people in the Western Pleasure classes, and just meeting other horse owners, and just sharing the camaraderie and the passion that we have for horses. John Dowdy:     Sure. Terri Murray:    It was a new experience for me. John Dowdy:     Great. Terri Murray:    So we went from just trail riding to the show ring, and it was a great experience. John Dowdy:     Yes. And in addition to that, you also participated in some of these parades out there, and for those who have not been to Hawaii and in these parades, tell us a little bit about what those were like. Terri Murray:    Okay, so the parades, when you have an equestrian division, which has been going strong here in Hawaii, they are consisted of riders that represent each island and the Hawaiian island chain with a banner, a princess of the island, and then you have anywheres from four to five escorted horses behind you, including the attendance. And with that, you dress and adorn yourself in the [inaudible 00:05:02...

 

Terri Dinubilo Murray – Blown Tendon, Abscess, Hoof
Growth, Shiny Coat, Life is back – Health Happy Horse

John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. We are going to swing way out West. That’s out West for me since I’m in Florida. We’re going to go out to Oahu, Hawaii, and we’ve got Terry Murray on the Equinety podcast this week. Terry, welcome to the call.

Terri Murray:    Thank you. I’m glad to be here. I’m very eager to share my testimony about this wonderful product.

John Dowdy:     Well, that’s great. We’re glad to have you. And let’s start off talking about your horse. Just from our pre-call, you had brought this horse in from the mainland, and for those of you on the mainland, that’s us on the big, big island of the United States. You’re out there on the island by itself. So you brought this horse in from where in the States?

Terri Murray:    This horse came from the Cascade Range of Washington.

John Dowdy:     Okay, so this was about in 2006-ish timeframe?

Terri Murray:    Yes.

John Dowdy:     Okay.

Terri Murray:    She actually came to us in the January of 2006, yes.

John Dowdy:     Got you. So before you brought it over, she was vet checked, and the vet that checked her out said she had a bit of stifle issues. But when you got her there on the island, what did your local vet… what was his take on what was going on?

Terri Murray:    With the stifle issue that she had, it wasn’t very prevalent, and he basically said with conditioning and exercise that that would help reduce any type of stifle inadequacies where she’s unable to move. It would help that.

John Dowdy:     So you kind of just started off doing some conditioning and trying to get her in shape and things like that?

Terri Murray:    Yeah. So what we did was a friend of ours had a cattle ranch, and so we went and boarded her there for a couple of months and just had fun with her moving cows. She was stalled. She had some pasture time. We’d work with her on a daily basis, slowly bringing her up to a good healthy condition.

John Dowdy:     Sure. And then, you got the itch like most horse people do. And so you started doing some training; so, what were you training her to do at this point?

Terri Murray:    Okay, so I met somebody here that was alongside the vet. She was an assistant and she kept encouraging me to show Winnie. She had a lot of eye appeal and was a looker. And so shortly after, maybe about, I want to say, Oh, about two years later, I met a gal that was willing to coach me and teach me how to ride and get ready for the Western Pleasure show that was short- lived here in Hawaii. But we showed in both the Equine Class and the Western Pleasure, and at times, the trail course.

John Dowdy:     And being a novice rider getting into that, I hear you did very well one year.

Terri Murray:    One year we did take the novice championship, and so, that was really exciting. It was exciting to meet other people in the Western Pleasure classes, and just meeting other horse owners, and just sharing the camaraderie and the passion that we have for horses.

John Dowdy:     Sure.

Terri Murray:    It was a new experience for me.

John Dowdy:     Great.

Terri Murray:    So we went from just trail riding to the show ring, and it was a great experience.

John Dowdy:     Yes. And in addition to that, you also participated in some of these parades out there, and for those who have not been to Hawaii and in these parades, tell us a little bit about what those were like.

Terri Murray:    Okay, so the parades, when you have an equestrian division, which has been going strong here in Hawaii, they are consisted of riders that represent each island and the Hawaiian island chain with a banner, a princess of the island, and then you have anywheres from four to five escorted horses behind you, including the attendance. And with that, you dress and adorn yourself in the [inaudible 00:05:02] fashion. You’re wearing 12 yards of fabric around you, which is tied around you and and cased with kukui nuts to give the draping effect. And then you have a [inaudible 00:05:16], which is the top that you adorn over you. Your colors represent the island colors and also the forage and the flowers. So your horses are adorned in horse leis, your riders have horse leis and flowers in their hair. Your men are dressed in Western, with Western hats and leis around their hats and it’s pretty spectacular. One of the parades in June is the King Kamehameha Day Celebration, which is almost a five mile ride, and then in September is the Aloha Festivals parade, which a 2.5 mile parade route.

John Dowdy:     Yes. Now, for those who are tuning in for the first time on our website at teamequinety.com, posted just below this podcast, it will all be transcribed and then we’ll have some pictures, because the way that you’ve explained that, that must just look really, really nice, with all the flowers and the horse leis and everything.

Terri Murray:    So the most important thing I want to say about parades is these horses need to be in condition. It’s very hot and humid here in Hawaii. The sun comes up very early. These parades are in the beginning of the worst heated months of the year, and ends in the most hot months of the year, which is September. And so, you have a lot of horse owners that rent their horses out, or you have few of us that own horses that actually participate in the parade.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Well, that’ll be nice to see these pictures.

John Dowdy:     So as you’re… and you do this for about eight years, doing these parades and things. Yep. And so, Winnie was getting to the point where… starting to develop a bit of arthritis, as you explained to me. So you’re thinking, “Well, I may have to look at retiring her.”

Terri Murray:    Right. So Winnie, we did retire her, she was age 24 when she rode her last parade.

John Dowdy:     Yes. And so you boarded her at another facility, and you got another horse.

Terri Murray:    Correct.

John Dowdy:     Yes.

Terri Murray:    We got another horse.

John Dowdy:     Yep. So, with Winnie being over at the other place to live out her horse life, things didn’t go so well, and there was a little bit of trouble where she wouldn’t get up. Tell us a little bit about that.

Terri Murray:    Well, on the beautiful North shore of Oahu, we have a beautiful ranch that you can turn your horse out into… just a small pasture, but is large enough for two horses to graze continuously. I thought it would be a great way for her to retire out from being stalled for that many years with me. And she had given me so much of her heart and doing what I love to do that I thought it would be a great idea to pasture her. So we set forward, trailered her, load her up, took off to this beautiful pasture, walked her out to introduce her to her new pasture mate, which was a gelding, and we could see he was getting aggressive.

Terri Murray:    So when he continued to graze, we were there. She kept her eye on us, and I could see that. And we weren’t going anywhere until we knew that this was going to work with this new horse living with her. I want to say about 20 minutes into the introduction period, he charged her. And she took off. And at that time, we knew we had to separate them; they weren’t going to be able to co-habitate, so a hot wire fence went up and they were separated. We finished putting her up, getting her done for the day, and came back to see her the following Saturday, and she was a different horse.

Terri Murray:    Pretty much, the life had left her eyes. We could see she wasn’t as happy as we expected her to be. She wasn’t moving. She really didn’t care to graze very much. So we began supplementing her with feed and dropping feed twice a day. Second week after that, we came and she was still… she was in the same spot that we left her; walked her around, tried to get her to walk around, just spend time with her there. She was walking very slowly as if she didn’t want to move.

Terri Murray:    The third week we realized it was time to move her out, and the ranch manager agreed. They felt that she just wasn’t doing well with this other horse, and putting her in another pasture with a older mare would remedy things. Moved her to another pasture with the older mare and she was fine with her; they were fine with each other; no hot wire fence. They grazed together. And then a week later, Winnie was down, and down more than she should have been.

Terri Murray:    So I got the phone call that she wasn’t getting up, and that’s when we went out and we decided to bring her home.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. And so, you didn’t really know what was going on specifically, and you had your vet come out to see if they could find anything going on?

Terri Murray:    Correct. So with the ranch manager and I, and her being a good friend of mine, we both decided that yeah, it was time for her to come back to the stall so that I could keep more of an eye on her and see what’s going on. Being that she was further away from me, I was only able to see her once a week. So, I brought her back and made the appointment with the vet. He came maybe about four days later and took x-rays. And it wasn’t until he went to try to lift her front left that we noticed she lifted it… exaggeratedly lifted it over her head. That’s how high her leg went up. And that’s when he detected, “Okay, it’s this leg right here.” Took more x-rays, and then he confirmed it was a blown sesamoidean ligament.

John Dowdy:     Hmm. So, and that was caused from probably when she was charged by the other horse and took off real quickly?

Terri Murray:    We have a good assumption that it could have happened then, because my immediate response was, “How could this happen? How did she get like this? What causes this?” And he said one of the most often ways a horse blows their tendon like this is when they just take off quickly, or their footing is off that they land on… just sudden movement can even create that, because he knew I wasn’t riding her a lot. This was on her own.

John Dowdy:     Right.

Terri Murray:    So, yeah… so he immediately prescribed aspirin and stall rest.

John Dowdy:     Yes. So this was in August of 2018 timeframe?

Terri Murray:    This was more like September, because we had turned her out in August. And so by September, we had brought her back home. Yeah.

John Dowdy:     Okay. So then with-

Terri Murray:    Or back to the barn where we…

John Dowdy:     Right. So with this injury… so the vet’s telling you about a six month stall rest, really, for this injury to heal?

Terri Murray:    Yeah. He said, “Give it at least six months to see if it’ll just mend on its own.”

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Wow. So, and also I think it’s important at this stage, you still did not know that Equinety existed. So, this was an injury… you’re following the vet’s recommendation, stall rest. Now, of course, with that injury being on the left front, what happened to the hooves? Because she was now favoring the other one.

Terri Murray:    Correct. It just doubled the issue that was happening with her ruptured tendon. So that was on her front left, so she would not bear weight on that leg. All her weight was placed on her front right, and then we’ve seen what was developing from that is her hoof could not… she couldn’t grow a heel. Her hoof basically grew out flat like a pancake, so she was rocking back on her heels and very reluctant to lift her hoof for us to even clean or pick her hooves. So therefore, because of that flat foot and being in the stall and the moisture, she developed an abscess that went straight up above the hairline of her hoof.

John Dowdy:     Wow. So I would probably be safe to guess her overall mood and demeanor, that she’s probably feeling pretty depressed because she can’t get out, and in pain.

Terri Murray:    Yes.

John Dowdy:     Yeah.

Terri Murray:    Yep. It was very visible. Winnie was the type of horse, as soon as she heard your car, she would nick, or she’d be at the corner of her stall waiting for you, hanging her head over the stall posts. When they would pull up, Winnie would be laying down.

John Dowdy:     Wow. So she was not getting any better, and being depressed, just laying around a lot.

Terri Murray:    Yeah.

John Dowdy:     Yeah.

Terri Murray:    Just keeping off her legs because she was in so much pain.

John Dowdy:     Sure. Yep. So, now we skip forward through 2018. We get into 2019; that’s around the February timeframe.

Terri Murray:    Yeah.

John Dowdy:     And this was when you came across the Equinety product.

Terri Murray:    Right. So we were looking at it in January; we ordered it late January, because we can see… between the time where she was diagnosed up until when we started thinking about Equinety, she still hadn’t walked out of her stall. We would force her out, of course, because we had to bathe her and wash her and get her out of her stall just so we could clean it properly, and just hopefully get her to move, whether she wanted to or not for various reasons. And so, that was a forced situation.

Terri Murray:    So what we would do… what we did was we ordered the Equinety in January; we got it within a week, and we started two scoops every day.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Now let me ask you this question. So prior to the Equinety… so you’re now getting in close to a six month mark, or around the five or six month mark. Winnie’s obviously very depressed, she’s not getting up, you’re kind of forcing her to come out. Had that crossed your mind? Were you starting to maybe thinking about the inevitable? Was there any hope in there at all? What was your feeling like at that point?

Terri Murray:    Yeah. When I would see her down so much, even before we left the pasture, I thought at that point she was going to have to get put down, because I was afraid she wasn’t going to get up for us to load her, because we had been trying and trying and trying, and it took a lot of coursing to get this horse up on her feet.

John Dowdy:     Yeah.

Terri Murray:    So that was the first thought that crossed my mind, that I have to get her out of her misery. I can’t stand to see her like this, and I refused to take pictures of her like that. So a lot of people want to see testimonial pictures of her in her worst. I couldn’t take pictures of her like that because that’s not how I wanted to remember her. Yeah.

John Dowdy:     No, that makes sense, and so, then you came across the Equinety with a lot of the advertising that we do. What was your thoughts then? Why not? What do we have to lose? Or what was your thoughts there when you came across our product? Or did you just see the other testimonials and think, “Well, there’s a possibility this could help?”

Terri Murray:    Yeah, I had hopes, high hopes. I kept reading it, looking at it, watching the testimonials. We had tried other supplements while we were showing, because just to keep her in better shape… and I never saw any improvement off of the other supplement that we tried, and it’s a very well- known brand name that is in the horse community. You see it often, but… and I don’t want to mention it, but I’m just saying, you’re not so quick sometimes to just start investing your money into powder products. You’re just not sure because by the time a horse is her age, I understand most of her cellular reproduction is shot. She’s older. It just happens with age.

Terri Murray:    But I have to say that this horse, she had given me a good part of her life… that I changed my life forever.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. No, for sure. You guys had definitely been through a lot.

Terri Murray:    And I didn’t want to give up on her, and so, I said, “Why not?” So, my husband was the one, and he picked up the supplement first. He said, “We’re going for it. Let’s try it.” So we did, and that’s when I want to say everybody was in awe!

Terri Murray:    And what’s going on with Winnie… and this was like was within a month… she would walk out. We would just open her stall gate, because I really hated trying to lead her out, because her head would go up and down really hard as to telling us not to do that, because she’s not ready to move. And so when we would just go up there, we’d open her gate, walk away; okay, when she’s ready, she’ll walk out. And I have to say towards the end of February this was happening. Yeah. She’d take five steps, and then more and more.

John Dowdy:     So right up to using the product, how was the swelling in her leg from this tendon that was torn?

Terri Murray:    Okay, so very noticeable. The bulb above the heel that reaches up into the short cannon? That was fat. It was noticeably big.

Terri Murray:    So I want to say after the Equinety and towards the end of February, we started to see, “Oh, look at her leg.” That was the first thing we were watching, to see if the leg was going to start looking more normal again, and narrow and thinning out and not so inflamed, and it began to happen. And when that began to happen, that’s when she started stepping out more and more on her own.

John Dowdy:     Right. Yeah. So from the time of the injury, from the stall rest, which was in September, all the way to February… so, we’re looking at close to six months there… the swelling was still there. You started the Equinety, and within a month, the swelling had drastically gone down, and she’s now walking out of the stall on her own.

Terri Murray:    That’s correct, yes.

John Dowdy:     Wow. So… now, we might have some people listening in and think, “Well, of course, the vet said six months; so, that was at the six month timeframe. So I guess that could be an argument of, ‘well, the six months were up, so of course she’s feeling better.'” But in every case that we’ve seen, and I think this is important for those tuning in for the first time… if you’re dealing with an injured horse, we just hear this over and over and over and over again… that with an injured horse, and you add the Equinety, the healing time is drastically faster. A lot of times half, but it’s definitely ahead of schedule.

John Dowdy:     So in this case, it was a six month kind of a stall rest at a minimum; so we’re already at the six months when you started the Equinety, but within a month the swelling had gone down, and now she’s walking out of her stall.

Terri Murray:    Right.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. And what other things did you notice this?

Terri Murray:    So I noticed her life came back into her eyes. Her coat was super shiny. Her appetite increased. She started to gain back her weight. Just a lot more alert. She would go further and further from her stall; so, she was at the other end of the barn grazing on her own, walking around. It was significant.

Terri Murray:    And I hear you saying, it was at the six month mark, which the vet… but up until that six month mark, she was still lying down a lot and still inflamed.

John Dowdy:     Yes. Yeah.

Terri Murray:    So we were waiting to see if this… we were giving it a shot. Okay. You said six months, we’ll try. But there wasn’t significant improvement, other than she was able to stand up more, but now we had the abscess in the hoof.

John Dowdy:     Right.

Terri Murray:    And on the good leg; so, multiple things were happening, which we had to do something fast, and needed to see much quicker improvement in all areas of now that Winnie was experiencing.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, so in February, you started giving the product. So, now you’re dealing with the abscess and the hoof that was all out of whack, because she was favoring the… so what happened next over the next, say, couple months? What did you notice?

Terri Murray:    So, increase in energy. Her hooves started to grow out. The abscess went away. However, the abscess, of course, leaves damage, in the tissues and in the whole area. It actually blew out, like I said, the top part of her hairline… above the hoof wall is where it blew out. So now it was a a matter of keeping this hoof clean, getting it grown out so we could start trimming it, and the fact that the shoer couldn’t do anything because Winnie wouldn’t bear weight on the damaged leg.

John Dowdy:     Right.

Terri Murray:    So we couldn’t lift that foot. We couldn’t trim it. We couldn’t do anything. He managed to do it while she was lying down. And this was in February, after we already started her on the product.

Terri Murray:    So with that said, hooves started to grow out, continued trimming, more increased energy; her weight’s still coming back; her coat, nice. She’s a lot more alert. Her mind is there. She wants turnout time, so we did turn her out. She was starting to run across the arena by March.

John Dowdy:     That’s incredible.

Terri Murray:    Loping and running across… yeah. And this was still with no shoes on. Her hoof still needed to get growth on it and so forth, but she was ready to go and we could tell. And we just waited for her to tell us; we weren’t forcing anything. Right.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. So, by May, you were able to put shoes on.

Terri Murray:    Yes.

John Dowdy:     And then what miraculous thing happened in June?

Terri Murray:    In June, we saddled up, mounted up and we went up the trail. Yeah.

John Dowdy:     Wow.

Terri Murray:    And I got an awesome trail ride, and I rode her up the trail through the summer, actually.

John Dowdy:     Yeah.

Terri Murray:    So, it was getting too hot and unbearable, but it was nice evening rides, and she loved it. She was looking forward to it.

John Dowdy:     So she’s happy, and the spark is back in her eye.

Terri Murray:    Yeah. I mean, we can now enjoy rides together, leisure rides.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. That’s fantastic.

Terri Murray:    She still has turn out time. Her hooves are great. She’s getting shod regularly. No abscess, no swelling. She has a good appetite.

John Dowdy:     I didn’t ask you this before. Have you done any ultrasounds or anything in regards to that tendon, or is it just, she just sound?

Terri Murray:    I would say, she’s not hundred percent from the injury. You could still see where… this injury was so bad that the growth of her hooves are not… they’re not equal. They’re not super balanced. Her left foot that actually was injured, grew out much more nicer than the one that she had bared weight on all this time. And no, I haven’t had any more x-rays at this time. I don’t feel the need for it, yeah.

John Dowdy:     No, it can get expensive, too. I mean, and like you said, if you’re reading your horse, then that’s great.

John Dowdy:     Now let me ask you this question. We get a lot of people that wonder how palatable this product is. So, what have you found… you use a little bit different way to make sure she gets it, but we usually don’t have palatability issues. But what’d you find with Winnie?

Terri Murray:    Well, I wanted to make sure… because here’s a couple of things. When she does get tubes and she gets hay and she gets senior feed, so I didn’t want it to get lost in that. Because of her age and her bite, there are crumbs left when she eats. So unlike my younger horse, he licks the bowl clean. I can tell if everything’s been ingested; with her, I cannot. So I wanted to be sure… it smells great. But what I do is I use… I just put some in the apple sauce that I buy at Sam’s Club. It’s a case of about 18 little cups, and I just open up a cup and I mix it in there, put it in the syringe, and I administer it to her every night.

Terri Murray:    Now, she’s down to one scoop, and I have to say, I kept her at two scoops for the first 50 or 60 days, and then down to one.

John Dowdy:     Yeah.

Terri Murray:    So, I think just administering that boost, that extra scoop, and they’re getting that boost initially… I think it’s very beneficial.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. You know what? We get a lot of feedback, and there there is some science behind that. So, the amino acids in Equinety are specifically formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland, which releases the necessary hormones that help heal at a cellular level. So, this is why it does so many things for different horse, no matter what’s going on with them. But the hormones that are released have a 23 and a half hour life cycle, so if you give the product in the morning, then it spikes the hormones, and then over the next 23 and a half hours, she’s just decreasing until you give it the next time, and then it spikes again.

John Dowdy:     So by giving one scoop in the morning and one scoop in the evening, you’re spiking it twice, so it never has a chance to really get down to those low levels, because you’re always kind of keeping it at a high level. So we have a lot of people in the performance horse industry that are doing a lot of hauling and showing; they absolutely swear by two scoops a day. And also for an injured horse, or one that’s coming out of a surgery, or in this case here with Winnie, two scoops a day is very beneficial.

John Dowdy:     Now with all that being said, there is no loading dose. It’s just, here’s where we recommend the two scoops over the one. But one scoop definitely will keep the maintenance going, for sure.

John Dowdy:     So… well, I tell you what, it has been a pleasure having you on the call, and is there anything else that you’d like to add that we haven’t touched upon? Or maybe if there’s somebody listening in for the first time that might be sitting on the fence as to whether to try this or not, it might have any encouraging things to say to them.

Terri Murray:    Well I just want to say, I know there’s a lot of horse owners out there. I actually thought… everybody thought Winnie was foundering. That’s how badly her mobility was, and it wasn’t the case at all. But I would say, you don’t have anything to lose, because it’s a great product, no matter what. Your horse is ingesting something that’s good for them. I have to say… if your horse is on Butte, or you’re just getting by with Butte, just to ride them and get them out for the day… I would stop investing in that and put your investment in the Equinety product, for more of the long duration of keeping and owning your horse, and keeping them up to healthy standards, and the potential to stay that way longer to enjoy them even longer.

Terri Murray:    You will find a significant difference in your horse. I’m very happy, and I have to say this, too. My husband and I both feel very blessed that we took the step of faith and tried this product, because it has been a miracle, and there are people around the barn that say the same thing, and those that have already purchased the product and had their horses on it already. So, thank you so much, and thank you for the opportunity to share my story.

John Dowdy:     Absolutely. Well, we appreciate you being on the call, and thank you so much. Terry Murray out of Oahu, out on the island there. Thank you so much for being on the Equinety podcast.

Terri Murray:    Thank you, John.

John Dowdy:     All right, thank you. Bye bye.

 

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

 

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  Terri Dinubilo Murray - Blown Tendon, Abscess, Hoof Growth, Shiny Coat, Life is back - Health Happy Horse John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We are going to swing way out West.  <br /> <br /> <br /> Terri Dinubilo Murray - Blown Tendon, Abscess, Hoof<br /> Growth, Shiny Coat, Life is back - Health Happy Horse<br /> John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. We are going to swing way out West. That's out West for me since I'm in Florida. We're going to go out to Oahu, Hawaii, and we've got Terry Murray on the Equinety podcast this week. Terry, welcome to the call.<br /> <br /> Terri Murray:    Thank you. I'm glad to be here. I'm very eager to share my testimony about this wonderful product.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Well, that's great. We're glad to have you. And let's start off talking about your horse. Just from our pre-call, you had brought this horse in from the mainland, and for those of you on the mainland, that's us on the big, big island of the United States. You're out there on the island by itself. So you brought this horse in from where in the States?<br /> <br /> Terri Murray:    This horse came from the Cascade Range of Washington.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Okay, so this was about in 2006-ish timeframe?<br /> <br /> Terri Murray:    Yes.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Okay.<br /> <br /> Terri Murray:    She actually came to us in the January of 2006, yes.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Got you. So before you brought it over, she was vet checked, and the vet that checked her out said she had a bit of stifle issues. But when you got her there on the island, what did your local vet... what was his take on what was going on?<br /> <br /> Terri Murray:    With the stifle issue that she had, it wasn't very prevalent, and he basically said with conditioning and exercise that that would help reduce any type of stifle inadequacies where she's unable to move. It would help that.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     So you kind of just started off doing some conditioning and trying to get her in shape and things like that?<br /> <br /> Terri Murray:    Yeah. So what we did was a friend of ours had a cattle ranch, and so we went and boarded her there for a couple of months and just had fun with her moving cows. She was stalled. She had some pasture time. We'd work with her on a daily basis, slowly bringing her up to a good healthy condition.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Sure. And then, you got the itch like most horse people do. And so you started doing some training; so, what were you training her to do at this point?<br /> <br /> Terri Murray:    Okay, so I met somebody here that was alongside the vet. She was an assistant and she kept encouraging me to show Winnie. She had a lot of eye appeal and was a looker. And so shortly after, maybe about, I want to say, Oh, about two years later, I met a gal that was willing to coach me and teach me how to ride and get ready for the Western Pleasure show that was short- lived here in Hawaii. But we showed in both the Equine Class and the Western Pleasure, and at times, the trail course.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     And being a novice rider getting into that, I hear you did very well one year.<br /> <br /> Terri Murray:    One year we did take the novice championship, and so, that was really exciting. It was exciting to meet other people in the Western Pleasure classes, and just meeting other horse owners, and just sharing the camaraderie and the passion that we have for horses.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Sure.<br /> <br /> Terri Murray:    It was a new experience for me.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Great.<br /> <br /> Terri Murray:    So we went from just trail riding to the show ring, and it was a great experience.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Yes. And in addition to that, you also participated in some of these parades out there, and for those who have not been to Hawaii and in these parades, tell us a little bit about what those were like.<br /> <br /> Terri Murray:    Okay, so the parades, when you have an equestrian division, which has been going strong here in Hawaii, John Dowdy clean 35:44
038 – Teri Allen – 5 Horses – Stringhalt – Stifle – Mystery Lameness – Navicular – HOT Mare – Kissing Spine https://www.teamequinety.com/038-teri-allen-5-horses-stringhalt-stifle-mystery-lameness-navicular-hot-mare-kissing-spine/ Wed, 20 Nov 2019 14:00:42 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1787   Teri Allen - 5 Horses - Stringhalt - Stifle - Mystery Lameness - Navicular - HOT Mare - Kissing Spine   John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. I am really excited as I am every week to have on our next guest, Teri Allen out of Elizabeth, Colorado. Teri, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Teri Allen:         Thank you. Thanks for having us and letting us talk about the product and having us here this morning. John Dowdy:     Well, we're glad to have you. And I know you've got a plate full, you've got a farm with around 55 horses. You've got a boarding facility, you've got your Terolyn Horse Rescue. And let's just jump right into this. Tell us a little bit about your rescue project because we've got four different horses we're going to talk about. And I know that you've got a lot of other stories, but we kind of zeroed in on these because we're going to be talking about one that you initially purchased the product for which had some stringhalt, stifle issues. Then three rescue horses that were kind of pre-navicular and another one which I'm excited to talk about on this call. Because I don't believe we've had any other person on the podcast talk about one with kissing spine, so that'll be very interesting and helpful for a lot of folks. But let's back it up a little bit and tell us about your Terolyn Horse Rescue and how that project all got started and how that's going. Teri Allen:         Oh. So I have been a horse trainer for many years. I've been at my current location for almost 20 years and along the way with training, I've occasionally taken a horse or two that were rescues that I would do some training on and then I would re-home. This became a real big project to me and very dear to me when I was asked to help with Morgan Safenet on going to an auction to save a Morgan horse, which is what I used to train, up in Fort Collins at one of the livestock auctions. And when I went there, seeing these horses in such horrible conditions, so stressed out, these horses were run behind the livestock, they weren't ridden through these sales. They were sold by the pound, they were just run over the scales, run into a very tiny arena ... very stressed out animals. And that's where I knew I had to step in and do more. We did end up saving the Morgan, but I'd say saving that horse is what started me on this path with the rescue. So that's been almost four and a half years ago and I became an official 501(c)3 four years ago. So we just try and get horses out at the slaughter pipeline. We try and get them ... before they go to auction, before they're in such stressed out conditions, we try and rehab them and then find them good homes. And it's always hard, it's never an easy thing, but really it's so important to me. It makes everybody feel so good when they know they can help in some way. We know we can't save them all, but the ones who can help, we're just so proud to have been able to do that for them. John Dowdy:     Sure. Now tell me about the rescue and the Annie's project and with the dude ranch horses. Teri Allen:         So we have partnered with another rescue here in Colorado, actually they're in Elizabeth, and it's Drifter's Hearts of Hope. And we were asked to partner with the Annie project, which is we take in retired dude ranch horses. There was just an abundance of ranch horses, guests horses that were going through these livestock auctions. And so Jackie from Drifter's decided that maybe it was a good idea to talk to them and try to intercept these horses prior to them going to these auctions which is really incredibly cool to be able to keep these animals out of a spotter pipeline just because once they're through an auction and they don't even necessarily have to end up in the kill pen, they're just stressed out. These animals go through a post traumatic stress and it sometimes takes weeks or months to get them to start coming around.

 

Teri Allen – 5 Horses – Stringhalt – Stifle – Mystery
Lameness – Navicular – HOT Mare – Kissing Spine

 

John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week’s Equinety podcast. I am really excited as I am every week to have on our next guest, Teri Allen out of Elizabeth, Colorado. Teri, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Teri Allen:         Thank you. Thanks for having us and letting us talk about the product and having us here this morning.

John Dowdy:     Well, we’re glad to have you. And I know you’ve got a plate full, you’ve got a farm with around 55 horses. You’ve got a boarding facility, you’ve got your Terolyn Horse Rescue. And let’s just jump right into this. Tell us a little bit about your rescue project because we’ve got four different horses we’re going to talk about.

And I know that you’ve got a lot of other stories, but we kind of zeroed in on these because we’re going to be talking about one that you initially purchased the product for which had some stringhalt, stifle issues. Then three rescue horses that were kind of pre-navicular and another one which I’m excited to talk about on this call.

Because I don’t believe we’ve had any other person on the podcast talk about one with kissing spine, so that’ll be very interesting and helpful for a lot of folks. But let’s back it up a little bit and tell us about your Terolyn Horse Rescue and how that project all got started and how that’s going.

Teri Allen:         Oh. So I have been a horse trainer for many years. I’ve been at my current location for almost 20 years and along the way with training, I’ve occasionally taken a horse or two that were rescues that I would do some training on and then I would re-home.

This became a real big project to me and very dear to me when I was asked to help with Morgan Safenet on going to an auction to save a Morgan horse, which is what I used to train, up in Fort Collins at one of the livestock auctions.

And when I went there, seeing these horses in such horrible conditions, so stressed out, these horses were run behind the livestock, they weren’t ridden through these sales. They were sold by the pound, they were just run over the scales, run into a very tiny arena … very stressed out animals.

And that’s where I knew I had to step in and do more. We did end up saving the Morgan, but I’d say saving that horse is what started me on this path with the rescue. So that’s been almost four and a half years ago and I became an official 501(c)3 four years ago.

So we just try and get horses out at the slaughter pipeline. We try and get them … before they go to auction, before they’re in such stressed out conditions, we try and rehab them and then find them good homes. And it’s always hard, it’s never an easy thing, but really it’s so important to me.

It makes everybody feel so good when they know they can help in some way. We know we can’t save them all, but the ones who can help, we’re just so proud to have been able to do that for them.

John Dowdy:     Sure. Now tell me about the rescue and the Annie’s project and with the dude ranch horses.

Teri Allen:         So we have partnered with another rescue here in Colorado, actually they’re in Elizabeth, and it’s Drifter’s Hearts of Hope. And we were asked to partner with the Annie project, which is we take in retired dude ranch horses. There was just an abundance of ranch horses, guests horses that were going through these livestock auctions.

And so Jackie from Drifter’s decided that maybe it was a good idea to talk to them and try to intercept these horses prior to them going to these auctions which is really incredibly cool to be able to keep these animals out of a spotter pipeline just because once they’re through an auction and they don’t even necessarily have to end up in the kill pen, they’re just stressed out.

These animals go through a post traumatic stress and it sometimes takes weeks or months to get them to start coming around. So this project is very cool because they’re coming from maybe a hardworking situation, but they’re not put through the stresses of the other part. But when we do take these horses in, what we’ve noticed is they’ve been used hard.

The ones that we’ve gotten in, all of them have sore, tense muscles, they’ve all definitely had feet issues. If you could imagine with them having to go up these mountains, these Rocky mountains here, they have to have these incredibly thick heavy shoes on. And most of these dude ranches ask that they are going up the mountain three times a day.

So by the time they’re retired, we’re trying to get them back into overall health. Our goal is to be able to do that, get them feeling better and then find them very light riding homes that they can retire in.

John Dowdy:     Sure. Wow. Well, that’s a pretty amazing project you’ve got going. And like you said, can’t save them all, but the ones that you are able to are able to live long, healthy lives so that’s very commendable for sure. So when we get into … you’ve been in the horse business now, what, 19 years? So when you started your boarding facilities.

So you definitely know horses, understand horses and of course you’ve dealt with a lot of different issues. And let’s get into talking about the first one, Lacey. What was going on with Lacey? She’s a 12 year old Morgan. Tell us a little bit about Lacey, what you were dealing with up until you found the Equinety product. What were you dealing with there?

Teri Allen:         Well, so Lacey is just a very sweet Morgan. It ended up, I used to train her and she was my horse and then my daughter started riding her and kind of claimed ownership of her. But she presented one morning of just very lame in her hind end. At first, maybe it looked like it was just kind of her hooves.

We do have a lot of issues around here with thrush if there’s rain or we’ve had any kind of moisture. It just seems that we have a lot of horses that are susceptible to that. So we brought her in, realized that there was more stuff going on, it wasn’t just her feet. She then began to kind of present more like the stringhalt type thing.

She had a very exaggerated gate with her right hind leg whereas she would walk, she would bring it way out to the side. And so right away, we had a vet out for a lameness evaluation. So the first vet that looked at her, we thought it was probably a stringhalt type thing brought on by a traumatic injury to the sensory nerves to the extension muscles.

And so we were told to rightly just stall rest, do a little bit of correction with our farrier, put some shoes on her because they also had some sensitivity of the hoof. And then she was also on … at first it was Bute, but after a couple of weeks being on Bute, we took it to [inaudible 00:08:56] just so we didn’t have to worry about the source as well.

And so this kind of continued on probably for another month and then we had another vet out. We just weren’t seeing any headway with this. And the same thing was by the second vet, that it was probably a stringhalt, but probably maybe she slipped while she was out on pasture. So we continued the cycle again, we started on the Bute, she was still on a stall rest.

And there was still no help, she still was lame. We couldn’t even take her for walks at this point. So that’s when I happened to be on Facebook, I was managing my rescue page, and one of your ads popped up and it was one with a video. And it was a horse that had similar movement in the hind end, just kind of a mystery lameness.

And it showed the before and the after video with this horse. So I called you right away and told you what was going on and asked if you could send me a couple samples just to get started. So we had tried everything I felt like, why not give this a shot? So putting on that, I really feel like it was not more than a week, definitely not weeks, that there was dramatic change.

When we brought her out of her stall to give her supplements, she could walk out of the stall. She didn’t have that where she’d pulled her leg out to the side. The softness in her eyes, just all the pain was gone. It was just … we were all shocked.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, yeah. Now, so you’re taking a horse that obviously in a lot of pain and you were … well, would it be fair to say you were kind of at your wit’s end? I mean, you’d try to all kinds of other things and didn’t really know what else to do and this horse is obviously not comfortable in any way.

Teri Allen:         Right, absolutely. I feel like if we hadn’t stumbled on this, I was getting to a point at least that … especially with the rescue work I do, if a horse does not have the quality of life to be a horse, then sometimes the best option is making a really hard decision. But absolutely I felt like this was our last shot.

John Dowdy:     Right. Yeah, I’ll jump in there because I believe the one that you’re referring to, we actually have a podcast on that one. That’s number 15, horse’s name is Monty. And this particular horse had stepped on something out in the field which brought up an abscess and then it turned to thrush, then cellulitis, had a heat stroke.

And watching that video is heartbreaking because this horse could put zero weight on its back left leg. And in about a week of being on product, it doesn’t even look like the same horse. I mean, you wouldn’t even know anything was wrong with this horse. So if you’re tuning in, that’s number 15 on that podcast.

But so this one, this Morgan was … when you saw that video you’re like, “Well, that’s kind of what seems like what’s going on with this one.” So after about a week on Equinety and here we go. So how long has Lacey been on the product up to this point and how is she doing now?

Teri Allen:         Right. So she’s been on the product now for about six months. When we saw such a huge difference, of course since she was our first one we tried on this, we continued with doing stall rest mostly. And slowly started doing the taking her back to hand walking, getting her back to doing some light conditioning work.

And then it probably may be two weeks later we decided to try and take her off of all the other medicine just to make sure she was still doing okay, but we did keep her on the Equinety. And she continued to be totally sound. She continued to just improve with her overall muscling, her muscle tone, her topline, everything was starting to come back.

And this is a horse that had been on stall rest for about six to eight weeks at that point. So she was looking pretty ragged, so just not only seeing her be fun again, but to see these improvements, her coat condition, her muscling just wasn’t tight anymore, was just incredible to see.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, that is awesome. Well, I think the best advice here for anybody that might be dealing with … it doesn’t matter really what the situation is. But if you feel like you’re at your wit’s end and don’t know what else to try because you’ve tried everything else, give Equinety a shot.

And for those of you tuning in for the first time, what the Equinety product is, it’s 100% pure amino acids which are specifically formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland which is the master gland in the body. And that’s what releases the necessary hormones which then help heal at a cellular level.

So what’s really neat about this product, there’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches, there’s no loading dose. And serving size is 5.2 grams which is not quite a tablespoon. But in this example … and as we go on, we’re going to talk about five different horses with kind of five different issues and what we’re going to find is it’s customizing to each horse.

Because we’re giving the horse what it needs to release its own hormones which then the body decides where to send those hormones for the healing, so that’s why this product is unique. It can do so many different things from one extreme thing to another.

So as we’ve just spoke about in this example, we’re dealing with stringhalts, some stifle issues, and you were at your wit’s end and this Morgan’s now doing great. So now … and Lacey was the horse that you initially were purchasing the product for, but after you saw the results that happened with her, then you had three rescue horses.

And so you’re thinking, “Well, let’s see what it can do with these.” What was going on with these particular three rescue horses?

Teri Allen:         Well, in all the years training and boarding, I really hadn’t dealt with any horses with muscular type issues. But a lot of times, we find that these horses that are sent through auction are having nonspecific lameness issues again. The owners just don’t want to work with a vet, they don’t want to try and treat it.

So a lot of these horses that we find have different usually hoof issues and we just so happened, in probably about a six month time period, we had three different horses come in into the rescue. They actually all had been adopted. They were doing pretty good with us and we just knew that if we kept up with the farrier care, they were doing okay.

Two of these horses ended up, through no fault of their own, coming back into our rescue and they were presenting with some hoof issues. So right away, when we get horses in or these horses, our only two horses that had come back ever in a rescue, we had the vet out to do lameness exam and we wanted him to go ahead and take some x-rays on these horses.

And again, with the X rays, it was pretty nonspecific. There was nothing blaringly obvious, but just from the heel pressure pain and the way the horses were moving, they were diagnosed with pre-navicular syndrome. We also then had a horse that had been moving pretty sound that had been adopted and he started then also presenting with similar stuff going on.

And again, he was also diagnosed with pre-navicular syndrome. With that, working with these vets, we did the whole protocol for the vicular stuff which included corrective shoeing. We put pads on these horses. They were all given the Osphos, some of them multiple doses, a couple of them were on isoxsuprine, and they were all on Equioxx to try and help.

So they all had kind of varying degrees and it was not always consistent on how they were presenting, but it was all similar. They were all going through the same thing, it was all stemming from the hoof. So absolutely we decided to try these horses on the Equinety. So the couple that had been adopted, we started them, we gave them a couple of the samples that you sent to us.

And these guys took a little bit longer. With Lacey, it was such an immediate improvement, but we stuck with it. We were probably about three weeks in when when our first one, Reeses, started moving much more sound. We ended up … the pads were not helping, the shoeing was not helping because with these horses, if we add shoes into the mix, once feet start growing out, a lot of times it actually hurts horses more.

Because they can’t change, the shoes don’t give to the pressure that that they need if they’re just barefoot. When they’re barefoot, we can easily just trim them more consistently or maybe file a little bit of their foot off. So the shoeing we were finding was actually a little detrimental on helping these horses. So again, we started them on this Equinety and we saw the improvement with Reeses.

The farrier came out, we actually pulled the shoes on her and she continued to do great. These other two took a little bit longer. It was probably about four or five weeks that we noticed these other two, Artex and Gambler, starting to move sound. So again, shoes came off, the horses were moving much better and only change we made is as they were on the product longer, we started weaning them off the other stuff.

So first the shoes and then the isoxsuprine and then the very last was the Equioxx. And again, with all three of these horses have been the similar issues. They were all moving much more sound. It was just incredible to watch. So with Reeses, she happened to steal the heart of our trainer, Jax, and she adopted her even though she was right in the middle of dealing with these hoof issues.

And she started using her for riding lessons so it was cool to see this horse that had come back to us and was in pretty rough shape being loved on, being used by these kids, having something that she enjoyed doing was really incredible. But I can remember a couple of weeks back they had pulled the horse out, they were doing in the lesson and in this horse was moving lame again.

So they ended up having to skip the lesson, put Reeses back away. And after the lesson, Jax and I were talking and she had run out of the Equinety product and it had been about four days earlier that this had happened. And she had just thought since she was moving so well that it was probably not going to be a big deal, but this horse had significant lameness again, enough so she couldn’t do the lesson.

So right there to us, or at least for myself, I thought, “Oh my gosh, it was Equinety, it’s working.” So of course we got her back on it as soon as we could and within the next week, she was back to being used for lessons again. So really then having two horses who had had such improvement, that was just incredible for me to see.

John Dowdy:     Right. Yeah, and I think it’s important because oftentimes we’ll get questions, the Equinety Horse XL, should I just use it to try to fix whatever issue I’m having and then I don’t have to use it anymore or is this a lifelong commitment? And so the best way to answer this, if you’re listening obviously you’ve just heard what happens, which is very typical when you take the horse off of the product.

And because what this product is ultimately doing is giving the body what it needs to release the hormones which help heal at a cellular level. The hormones that are released have a 23 and a half hour life cycle, so this is why you give the product every day. So in the example that you gave, we were able to increase the hormone levels by giving the amino acids.

And after X amount of time, those hormone levels are elevated at the highest levels that they can be. And when you stop giving the product, then the hormone levels just went back to the way they were prior to giving the Equinety so that’s where the lameness came back in. And then when you started giving the product again, it just increased the hormone levels and now the horse is sound again.

So we have people that have tried this voluntarily and seen results. And then we’ve had cases like this where it was involuntary because people ran out or they’re having someone else feed the product and didn’t know that they were out and all of a sudden their horse is lame again. So I think you or the people that have this as a question, you’ll find that once you start using the product, you probably don’t want to stop giving the product.

Teri Allen:         Correct.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, absolutely. So let’s get into the last horse here that we’re going to talk about. And I know you have a lot of other stories, but I think this is just a great example. And again, kissing spine which often comes up and I haven’t really been able to give anybody a definite yea or nay on this. And again, we also have to keep in mind the severity of what’s going on with the horse.

The Equinety product isn’t the end all be all. I tell people that used in combination with you know, corrective shoeing or proper care and proper feeding, this product is an amazing product to add to your existing program. And when it comes to kissing spine, I mean, which is a horrible thing in and of itself, but it can always benefit. This product can always benefit no matter what is going on.

But let’s get right into this. What was going on with this seven year old and what happened? Or what was going on and then what happened after giving the product?

Teri Allen:         Well, so this horse’s name is Cola and she belongs to a dear friend of mine, Andy. And Andy, I had her start her other horse, Tyson, who was one of our rescues that she adopted, on the product. He’s an older horse, he has some arthritis kind of through his whole body. And she was seeing such great results with him that she decided to start Cola on this.

Cola, a couple of years back, was having issues with her training. I was her trainer, she was very unhappy to work, we would get the full attitude. This horse has attitude anyways, but we would get the full attitude when we’d go to tack her up. We’d get attitude as we would do the groundwork with her. And then when a person would get on her, it just escalated.

She was not happy to work. She would grind your teeth. She would swish her tail. She was showing us that something wasn’t quite right even though she was moving sound with her groundwork. Just from what she was telling us, we knew we had to dig deeper. So we did schedule an appointment to take her in and she did have x-rays done and it was found that she had kissing spine so it wasn’t super severe.

It didn’t make it so she was not rideable, but they started her on a series of different, again, injections not only into the spine but also kind of with this horse compensating for that. She was having some soreness issues with her hocks and her backend. And if anybody has been around the horses and you start on the cycle of medical fixing of some of these lameness issues, it gets super, super expensive.

Andy dumped so much money into try and get this horse comfortable and moving sound that we kind of got to the point that was it worth continually dumping the money into the injections? This horse was given some time off. We had her put out on pasture, she was still getting daily Equioxx.

But for the injections, since it just became so expensive and we weren’t seeing any kind of significant improvement, we decided that it was probably not helping her enough with the money that was going out so that was a couple of years ago. So Andy would still bring her in, she would groom her, she would love her.

But really riding was kind of out of her day to day stuff just because she didn’t want to cause any pain with this horse. So she started her on Equinety and now it’s been I think close to three months and just to see the changes come over this horse was pretty incredible. This horse that had attitude just with grooming, just with the brushing, because she knew it was going to lead to the tacking up, the saddling.

She would have such attitude on the ground and that started to improve. And so as that started to improve, Andy started doing some saddle work again, just some light, light conditioning on the ground. And then we started doing a couple of lessons again together. And what I noticed is even though we were doing a super light workout, this horse that always, always would have her ears can back or her tail swishing or her teeth grinding, that was gone.

She was starting … her whole attitude was starting to improve. So to me, just seeing that, she was still on the Equioxx, but just by adding this Equinety in just to see some of these overall changes, this mare who definitely had sensitive skin issues, those seemed to disappear. This mare who when she’d come into season would be incredibly, incredibly mare-ish.

We couldn’t keep her in pasture with another horse, she just had attitude over the top about … yeah, anytime she was in heat. It was almost that we kind of avoided working her.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, watch out. Yep.

Teri Allen:         Yeah, watch out. And Andy, who is just such a sweet lady and such a great rider, didn’t ever feel comfortable working this horse on her own. We always had to work together, just this horse was that kind of horse. She was so smart that she could figure out what would get her out of working. So she always at that point had always worked with lessons with me.

So as she’s been on this product more and more, Andy is coming out. Andy is working this horse on her own. And just to see these changes, not only for the horse, but the confidence of the rider, to me that’s so impressive. Because we can work together and I’ve worked with Andy for going on four years now with just lessons.

And just to see her change since her horse’s attitude has changed was really, really great to see. So needless to say, that horse will be on the product forever. It’s just really, really great to see that change.

John Dowdy:     That’s great. Wow. Well, I think anybody tuning in to this one definitely should have received value. I really appreciate your time. I know you are super busy, especially with 55 head there, so I appreciate you taking the time to share your stories here on the Equinety podcast.

And before we sign off here, would you mind giving everybody your website or the best way to maybe contact you or maybe look at your facility or if they’re looking to do donations of any kind or anything like that, what would be the best way for them to find you?

Teri Allen:         Sure. Well, we’re on Facebook, it’s Terolyn Horse Rescue. And we also have a website, it’s www.terolynhorserescue.org. And also you could call me any time and if you have any messages or want to volunteer or want to make a donation, we can always, always use that. And my direct line is (303) 243-1147.

John Dowdy:     Okay. And would you do a favor force and just spell that a website out for us?

Teri Allen:         Sure. It’s T-E-R-O-L-Y-N-H-O-R-S-E-R-E-S-C-U-E.org.

John Dowdy:     Okay, perfect. Well, Teri, I really appreciate you taking the time and I know a lot of people are going to get a lot out of this one. So Teri Allen out of Elizabeth, Colorado, thank you so much for taking the time here on the Equinety podcast.

Teri Allen:         Thank you for having me.

John Dowdy:     Oh, you bet. Bye bye.

 

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  Teri Allen - 5 Horses - Stringhalt - Stifle - Mystery Lameness - Navicular - HOT Mare - Kissing Spine   - John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. I am really excited as I am every week to have on our next guest,  <br /> <br /> <br /> Teri Allen - 5 Horses - Stringhalt - Stifle - Mystery<br /> Lameness - Navicular - HOT Mare - Kissing Spine<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to this week's Equinety podcast. I am really excited as I am every week to have on our next guest, Teri Allen out of Elizabeth, Colorado. Teri, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Teri Allen:         Thank you. Thanks for having us and letting us talk about the product and having us here this morning.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Well, we're glad to have you. And I know you've got a plate full, you've got a farm with around 55 horses. You've got a boarding facility, you've got your Terolyn Horse Rescue. And let's just jump right into this. Tell us a little bit about your rescue project because we've got four different horses we're going to talk about.<br /> <br /> And I know that you've got a lot of other stories, but we kind of zeroed in on these because we're going to be talking about one that you initially purchased the product for which had some stringhalt, stifle issues. Then three rescue horses that were kind of pre-navicular and another one which I'm excited to talk about on this call.<br /> <br /> Because I don't believe we've had any other person on the podcast talk about one with kissing spine, so that'll be very interesting and helpful for a lot of folks. But let's back it up a little bit and tell us about your Terolyn Horse Rescue and how that project all got started and how that's going.<br /> <br /> Teri Allen:         Oh. So I have been a horse trainer for many years. I've been at my current location for almost 20 years and along the way with training, I've occasionally taken a horse or two that were rescues that I would do some training on and then I would re-home.<br /> <br /> This became a real big project to me and very dear to me when I was asked to help with Morgan Safenet on going to an auction to save a Morgan horse, which is what I used to train, up in Fort Collins at one of the livestock auctions.<br /> <br /> And when I went there, seeing these horses in such horrible conditions, so stressed out, these horses were run behind the livestock, they weren't ridden through these sales. They were sold by the pound, they were just run over the scales, run into a very tiny arena ... very stressed out animals.<br /> <br /> And that's where I knew I had to step in and do more. We did end up saving the Morgan, but I'd say saving that horse is what started me on this path with the rescue. So that's been almost four and a half years ago and I became an official 501(c)3 four years ago.<br /> <br /> So we just try and get horses out at the slaughter pipeline. We try and get them ... before they go to auction, before they're in such stressed out conditions, we try and rehab them and then find them good homes. And it's always hard, it's never an easy thing, but really it's so important to me.<br /> <br /> It makes everybody feel so good when they know they can help in some way. We know we can't save them all, but the ones who can help, we're just so proud to have been able to do that for them.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Sure. Now tell me about the rescue and the Annie's project and with the dude ranch horses.<br /> <br /> Teri Allen:         So we have partnered with another rescue here in Colorado, actually they're in Elizabeth, and it's Drifter's Hearts of Hope. And we were asked to partner with the Annie project, which is we take in retired dude ranch horses. There was just an abundance of ranch horses, guests horses that were going through these livestock auctions.<br /> <br /> And so Jackie from Drifter's decided that maybe it was a good idea to talk to them and try to intercept these horses prior to them going to these auctions which is really incredibly cool to be able to keep these animals out of a spotter pipeline just because once they're through an auction and they don't even nec... John Dowdy clean 34:42
037 – Lisa and Don Schledfeldt 6 Cutting Horses and a Mule https://www.teamequinety.com/037-lisa-and-don-schledfeldt-6-cutting-horses-and-a-mule/ Wed, 13 Nov 2019 14:00:46 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1785   Lisa and Don Schledfeldt 6 Cutting Horses and a Mule John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am excited this week. We are going into the cutting horse world and we're going to swing out to Yakima, Washington, and I've got Lisa and Don Schledfeldt on the Equinety podcast this week. Lisa and Don, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Don Schledfeldt:           Well, thank you. How are you today? John Dowdy:     We're doing just great on this side, and Lisa is there with you, as well? Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yep. Yep, and we're really excited to be here. John Dowdy:     Good. Well, I'm glad to have you. I know y'all are busy people out there, so I appreciate you taking the time. This week we're going to talk about six horses, and what farm isn't complete without a mule. Lisa Schledfeldt:            Excellent. John Dowdy:     Yeah. So I understand through our pre-call, you're got performance horses, you've got an older mare, you've got some boarding horses and of course your mule. So you've got a wide variety. You also use a lot of supplements through the years. Tell us a little bit about maybe what you've experienced, prior to using Equinety, you've got these performance horses and things. Tell us about, maybe in generic terms, your supplement. You're a fan of supplements, but it seems like there was always something just kind of missing. Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah, and I'm going to let my husband expand on that because, well, he used a lot of different supplements prior and was always investigating different kinds of supplements. John Dowdy:     And we don't have to go into specifics of names or anything, it's just I kind of want to give everybody, I'm sure there's other people similar, that are feeding a lot of different things and trying to look for stuff that would help. So that's kind of where that question's going. Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah, I've kind of researched the supplements through the years, just kind of researching what the horses really need and just that some of the prior supplements, you heard so many good things and there was just about as many bad things about it. And on the Equinety I just noticed that most of the testimonials are all positive, and now I see why, because the results that we've seen over the other supplement, they're a little more outstanding as far as- Lisa Schledfeldt:            Movement. Don Schledfeldt:           Movement and- Lisa Schledfeldt:            Coat. Don Schledfeldt:           The coats and the looks of the horse, compared to the other products. I mean, we got some of the shiny coats and that off of some of the other ones, but not to the extent that this has. They really just looked like they came out of a bath now. Yeah, pretty unbelievable. John Dowdy:     Yeah. Now, at the time of this recording, well, this one will be published right around the 1st of November, second week of November of 2019 so you guys just started using the Equinety product this year, right around August, September timeframe, end of August, first of September. Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah, I think it was right around probably the first or second week of August, we started them on it. John Dowdy:     Sure. Well, let's go through and we're going to go through, I'll just go down the line here. And so horse number one, Missy, tell us a little bit about Missy, what some of her quirks were or different things that were going on. What were you trying to help her with and then when you added the Equinety, what happened after that? Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah, Missy, she's just a real high-caliber cutting horse. She's really, really physical in the pen. She's just full of cow. Like I said, the most I've noticed on her is she just got a better topline and her muscle tone's a little more defined and just her endurance and ability to move better in the show pen. She's already a pretty thinky mare.

 

Lisa and Don Schledfeldt 6 Cutting Horses and a Mule

John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am excited this week. We are going into the cutting horse world and we’re going to swing out to Yakima, Washington, and I’ve got Lisa and Don Schledfeldt on the Equinety podcast this week. Lisa and Don, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Don Schledfeldt:           Well, thank you. How are you today?

John Dowdy:     We’re doing just great on this side, and Lisa is there with you, as well?

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yep. Yep, and we’re really excited to be here.

John Dowdy:     Good. Well, I’m glad to have you. I know y’all are busy people out there, so I appreciate you taking the time. This week we’re going to talk about six horses, and what farm isn’t complete without a mule.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Excellent.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. So I understand through our pre-call, you’re got performance horses, you’ve got an older mare, you’ve got some boarding horses and of course your mule. So you’ve got a wide variety. You also use a lot of supplements through the years. Tell us a little bit about maybe what you’ve experienced, prior to using Equinety, you’ve got these performance horses and things. Tell us about, maybe in generic terms, your supplement. You’re a fan of supplements, but it seems like there was always something just kind of missing.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah, and I’m going to let my husband expand on that because, well, he used a lot of different supplements prior and was always investigating different kinds of supplements.

John Dowdy:     And we don’t have to go into specifics of names or anything, it’s just I kind of want to give everybody, I’m sure there’s other people similar, that are feeding a lot of different things and trying to look for stuff that would help. So that’s kind of where that question’s going.

Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah, I’ve kind of researched the supplements through the years, just kind of researching what the horses really need and just that some of the prior supplements, you heard so many good things and there was just about as many bad things about it. And on the Equinety I just noticed that most of the testimonials are all positive, and now I see why, because the results that we’ve seen over the other supplement, they’re a little more outstanding as far as-

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Movement.

Don Schledfeldt:           Movement and-

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Coat.

Don Schledfeldt:           The coats and the looks of the horse, compared to the other products. I mean, we got some of the shiny coats and that off of some of the other ones, but not to the extent that this has. They really just looked like they came out of a bath now. Yeah, pretty unbelievable.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Now, at the time of this recording, well, this one will be published right around the 1st of November, second week of November of 2019 so you guys just started using the Equinety product this year, right around August, September timeframe, end of August, first of September.

Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah, I think it was right around probably the first or second week of August, we started them on it.

John Dowdy:     Sure. Well, let’s go through and we’re going to go through, I’ll just go down the line here. And so horse number one, Missy, tell us a little bit about Missy, what some of her quirks were or different things that were going on. What were you trying to help her with and then when you added the Equinety, what happened after that?

Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah, Missy, she’s just a real high-caliber cutting horse. She’s really, really physical in the pen. She’s just full of cow. Like I said, the most I’ve noticed on her is she just got a better topline and her muscle tone’s a little more defined and just her endurance and ability to move better in the show pen. She’s already a pretty thinky mare. She’s pretty smart on a cow, but she needed the most help in just the recovery and the stamina in the show pen. Sometimes if you get a cutting horse and you’re working them too hard, they’ll just stop and they’ll start backing up, you know? And I’ve had that problem with her before and I haven’t noticed that in the last month, working her. She just seemed more focused and more drive in her.

John Dowdy:     That’s pretty awesome. And I think what’s really interesting to point out for those that are tuning in is this particular mare is 13 years old. How long have you had her and how long have you been working with her prior to using the Equinety?

Don Schledfeldt:           I’ve had her for seven years.

John Dowdy:     Okay. So, safe to say that you definitely know how this mare works. You’ve got a definite baseline and you’ve tried or been using supplements on her before and different things to get her to perform at her best. So I think it’s important to point out that you really know this horse, you’ve had her on things and then you add the Equinety and it seemed to just fill in those gaps that you were really looking for all along.

Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah. I forgot to mention one other thing is she’s typically a horse that I have to have her hocked and injected twice a year. I haven’t injected her this year yet. I haven’t seen her stiff legged in the rear, so I’m hoping I can avoid that. And it seems like it’s working pretty good the way she is on this, on Equinety.

John Dowdy:     Sure. And you know, it’s interesting you bring that up because we have heard a lot of feedback with these performance horses that have regularly scheduled injections once or twice a year. We seem to hear a lot that since they’ve used the Equinety, they don’t have to be injected as often and sometimes not at all. Of course, all of this comes down to the severity of what’s going on in there. So, definitely we’re not saying that your horse doesn’t need it anymore. Obviously we want you to listen to your veterinarian and you know your horse better than anybody, so you’re going to be able to determine that. But it’s just some of the feedback that we’ve received and just interesting you bring that up. So, okay, let’s go into horse number two, which is also a 13-year-old, Maya.

Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah. Maya is a High Brow Cat cutting horse. Not a real athletic horse, but a real smart horse.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Pigeon toed.

Don Schledfeldt:           Oh, yeah, she was extremely pigeon toed when I got her, but we kind of worked that out. So she gets a little sore in the front, but, again, she’s a pretty mellow horse. Really thinks hard. But, like I said, she’s not real athletic and she’s kind of lazy. But, again, she comes alive on a cow and, like I said, she’s just got more go into her and she’ll go harder and longer. And I think she does recover a little bit faster from a workout.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            And the heat cycles.

Don Schledfeldt:           Her biggest problem, one of her biggest problems, was her heats. I’ve had her since she was four months old and she’s always cycled really hard. We’ve had her scoped, we’ve had her looked at, making sure there was nothing in there causing it. But she just cycles really hard. I mean, she’ll throw her hips on the panels and she’ll bend trailer gates and stuff.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Kick walls out.

Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah. And I just noticed lately that she’s not rubbing on the panels. I transported her the other day. Usually she’s a bucker in the trailer and throws herself on the gates, but that’s kind of gone away. I haven’t noticed it in the last month.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            You could’ve heard a pin drop in your trailer. There was no rocking and rolling. There was nothing.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. As you’re going down the road, you’re like, “Did you latch the trailer gate? Are those horses even back there?”

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Are the horses back there? Yeah, there was nothing. Yeah, those horses have always been together and they know each other, but there was still the kicking and the bucking and wheeling. But there was absolutely none of that. She was always a little bit bad even when she wasn’t in heat.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Oh, that’s great. Okay. Horse number three, which I believe is yours, Lisa, Jesse.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah. So Jesse is just a really hot caliber of horse. There’s a lot of calming her down. She’s the one I ride and I would lope her here at home. We have an arena here and we have a flag. So she was so bad I stopped loping her. I just long trot her. But working her on the flag is really traumatic for her. And I just noticed that walking up to the flag, she’s just a little calmer and really looking at a little more focused in, and it doesn’t take me that long to calm her down. So that was one thing. And her coat. But she’s an extremely athletic horse and very, very tough. Her movement’s always been really great. I’ve just noticed her be a little bit more mellow, a little more focused, not so drama driven.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. And I know one of the things that you are concerned with, because she was a pretty hot horse and so you were worried about this making her even hotter, right?

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah, yeah. We only feed grass hay, too, by the way. And we do turn them out. Like I said, we have a pretty good program where everybody gets out. You have to be a horse. And then we do the Equinety. That for her is really important. So I’ve always been leery about what she eats because she already can be pretty dramatic. So I don’t need anything extra.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Yeah. Now you also mentioned, and the reason I want to point this out, because we do get a lot of questions. People say, “Oh, my horse is hot. I don’t want something to make my horse hotter.” At the same time somebody might, you had mentioned she was calmer, but it’s not like given or a sedative or anything. It’s like they’re calmer but still very, very focused and they want to work. Is that what you found?

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah. I love riding her. She’s really fun to ride, but she’s a ton of energy. She’s easy to warm up. So, yeah, I don’t want that affected. I like that energy level that she has. What I want is I want her thinking. I want to be able to engage her and get her to start thinking clearly. Because I think there’s a difference there. When she gets pretty upset walking towards the flag, if she’s getting kind of nutty, I have to be able to just keep her going forward and she’s just more alert, a little calmer but yet that energy level’s there, I don’t ride with spurs or anything. I don’t need…

Don Schledfeldt:           Let me throw one more thing in there, getting back to the medicine. The NCHA, they allow us to use… We can use Ace to a certain percentage of the body weight and she’s typically the horse that we’ve had to Ace in the past, just to slow her down a little bit. We haven’t given her none in the last two months.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah, she hasn’t had any.

Don Schledfeldt:           She hasn’t had none.

John Dowdy:     Wow.

Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah.

John Dowdy:     Yeah.

Don Schledfeldt:           Now we have an arena here at home. We have an actual cutting pen here and so we work them here and the show season’s going to be starting. We’ve got to really start getting them in shape and stuff. But yeah, so I would always be concerned about giving her Ace because I want her thinking. You know, a hot horse that’s not thinking, to me, is real dangerous. But if they’re thinking… To me, there’s just a difference with her. I can feel it.

John Dowdy:     Right.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            You know? I just want her thinking. It’s okay to be afraid and it’s okay to have that energy. I can move her in the right place. It’s just I want her thinking and focused and that seems to come around a lot quicker.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. And I think it’s important for those tuning in. Equinety is 100% pure amino acids. So there’s nothing in this like a caffeine that jacks a horse up or a sedative that chills him down. It’s giving the horse what it needs to release its own hormones and then the body’s deciding where to send those hormones with pinpoint accuracy because the body knows exactly where this particular horse needs the healing. So we’ve gone through three horses with three completely different things and we’ve heard how it’s affected each one of these. And then we’ve got three more horses and a mule, so we’ll continue to go on here and see how just this one little tiny scoop is positively changing for the good, all of these horses, so that’s great.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah, and one thing, John, I wanted to add about Jesse, too. I’m going to start really looking for this with her. Pulling back when I tie her up and when I go to cinch her up, so I have a way that I cinch my horse up when I get her ready, because she would pull back. As long as I walk her and cinch up as I walk her. So I’m going to start really looking to see some improvement in that area. The last time I saddled up, I didn’t have any issue at all, but I’m kind of hypervigilant now about it, always watching for it. So that’s going to be telling, as well.

John Dowdy:     Absolutely. Yeah. Okay, now we’re going to go into horse number four, which is Barney, 13 year old. Tell us about that one.

Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah, Barney’s a 13 year old, smart little Lena gelding. He’s just my general ranch horse and turnback horse. I roped a few cows off of him. He’s just a big gelding. He hasn’t been really worked at hard since we started on him. But I have noticed a big difference in his body definition, his topline’s improved. He just looks really muscular because he’s so slicked out, so shiny.

John Dowdy:     How long have you had him?

Don Schledfeldt:           [crosstalk 00:14:09] I’ve had Barney since he was two years.

John Dowdy:     Two years. Yep. Wow. So I just find this fascinating, hearing this. You guys are obviously super in tune with your horses and you’re giving them and exercising them and doing the things that they need. And then it wasn’t until the Equinety that you noticed toplines filling in, they’re filling out muscle-wise and coat. To me that is fascinating. But it’s telling about the product, as well. So you also had mentioned to me earlier you’ve noticed, along with the more muscle and filling out, but he’s able to kind of kick it into a higher gear speed-wise at events, too.

Don Schledfeldt:           Yep. Yep, yep. He can get across the panel a lot quicker. Yeah. He’s just got a little more go in his step.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, that’s great.

Don Schledfeldt:           But it’s real important for me. When your horses are shiny and they look good and their muscle tone, people notice that a mile away, especially when you show up at a show and your horses, people are staring at them. That says a lot about your horses and your program.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. You’re going to have to add a little bucket there on the side. “If you look at my horse, you have to pay me a dollar,” or something.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah.

John Dowdy:     Okay, let’s get into your older mare, horse number five, Lacey.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah. So Lacey I’ve had for 20 years and, oh my gosh, she’s had laminitis for a lot of years, so I have to really watch her pasture time, what I feed her. I juted at her quite a bit, especially on days that she was uncomfortable, which I hated doing. Because I hear that’s really tough on their stomach and it’s really tough on their system. And also her soles had dropped so much. I always had to keep her padded. She couldn’t walk across anything that had a rock in it. But once I started the Equinety with her, right off, it had to be seven days, I noticed her just moving like I couldn’t believe. All this more flexibility and movement. And then I cleaned her feet sometimes twice a day because if mud gets up in there, and what I’ve noticed is that she has just more depth in her hoof.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            I mean a physical change, I actually noticed. I’m like, god, that’s just incredible. Yeah. And I haven’t padded her at all this summer. I haven’t even padded her. And I was concerned about that and I asked my shoer back in August if I should put pads on her. She said, “Well, we were going to,” and then I said, “Well, let me go another couple months and we’ll see.” And I haven’t. I started her right away on the Equinety after that and so I just decided I’m not going to pad her any more.

John Dowdy:     And I know one of the other things you were telling me about, she always just kind of moved a little slow, had a little limp to her in the front end.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            She was always off in her front end, terrible limp. She still has a little bit of a limp, but sometimes, now what I’ve noticed about the limp is that it’s light and it comes and goes. So sometimes she doesn’t have it but once in a while she will and I usually have to go out and clean her feet. But, no, she’s out on the pasture for morning time to get out and stretch. And she was trotting across the pasture. I mean, she’s a big mare and probably shouldn’t have lived this long.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, yeah. Wow. Okay.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah. And I don’t like ribs showing and all that. No, she looks really good for an older mare.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, that’s pretty awesome. Now, you also board a few horses and there’s one by the name of Checks. Tell us about this one that you started on. What was going on with him prior to Equinety?

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Besides my old mare, this one horse that I hadn’t been around, so seeing him come in to be boarded and seeing what he is now in just a couple months, it’s just been incredible. And it hasn’t even been a full two months, I don’t think. So he came in on September eighth and he is my friend’s daughter’s barrel horse and competitive, and he’s 18. They’ve had him for seven years and he’s come a long way in those seven years. It was a pretty brutal life for him prior to them getting him. He was very ribby when I got him here. So the first thing we did is we wormed everybody, of course. And then I started him right away, with her permission, on the Equinety. And what I noticed, it wasn’t that long… One of the things that he did, and I think it’s trauma-based, was a lot of swaying in the pen, swaying back and forth.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            And when I started him on the Equinety, what I noticed in about seven or eight days, first of all he started filling out a lot better. But the swaying, I hardly see it anymore at all and I’m out here with them three times a day. Of course, all horses get turned out and back in the pens, but I have not seen him. I think this week alone, I think I saw him sway just maybe once, just slight. To me, from what I’ve seen, that’s just incredible.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Well, anyway, she comes out and legs him up. Not a whole lot in the last month, but she went out and did a big jackpot barrel race out here by the home here and she went out. This horse is 18 years and he went out and it was flawless. It was beautiful. We thought she took first place. He kicked butt, but he ended up second. It was just a beautiful run. It was flawless. It was crazy.

John Dowdy:     Wow. Yeah. Feeling good.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah, they said they hadn’t seen a run like that from him in a while. I mean, it was beautiful.

John Dowdy:     That’s so great. Obviously he’s feeling really nice. Feeling good.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah, the flexibility that he showed and the speed. I mean, it didn’t even look faster, it was so beautiful. It’s crazy. And now he’s really filled out. He looks really solid. It’s just sometimes I look at him and I just can’t quite believe it almost.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. Wow. Okay, let’s talk about Ringo, the mule. Tell us about Ringo.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Well, Ringo, oh gosh, we’ve had Ringo about three or four years and we’re just kind of letting him grow. So anyway, we put them on pasture, but I keep telling my husband he’s been out there too much. He’s starting to show signs of laminitis or some founder. “No,” he said, “mules don’t founder,” and I said, “Yes, they do.” Anyway, I had the vet come out and, sure enough, it was in his front feet. He was just really, really sore and lethargic. Anyway, so I pulled him off. And so from August through recently, he’s only gotten grass hay. I stalled him for a while with lots of shavings because of the soreness. And I got him to lose some weight. Well, then I started him on the Equinety and, no, he’s as good as new right now. You would never know. He runs all over. Terrorizes everybody else after. He’s back to his old self.

John Dowdy:     And no signs of the laminitis or anything?

Lisa Schledfeldt:            No, no. Oh no, you would never know. It’s crazy. It’s just nuts. Of course, again, we turn him out, we give them good exercise, and we can ride here at the place. We try to help them be mentally a horse as much as we can, but the shine in their coat and just kind of the way they’ve filled out and their minds, it just kind of blows me away, still.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. So now let’s talk about palatability. So we’ve got seven different animals here. There has to be some picky eaters in this group. So is that-

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah, so Maya and Missy, not so much Missy, but Maya… Well, Missy does it, too. They started dumping their grain pans and eating around and so they would leave. This I don’t. I just plop one scoop on top of their food and there’s no issue whatsoever. Now I haven’t had one eat around it at all. In fact, my goats will get in and eat it, too, with my old mare. I’ve got to kind of watch them. But they all get in there. It hasn’t seemed to make a bit of difference.

John Dowdy:     Well, that’s good. So saving food. Now, without giving away names or anything like that, are you still giving the other supplements and things or are you just adding the Equinety to it?

Lisa Schledfeldt:            No.

John Dowdy:     So you’re just using the Equinety?

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah. We have brand new supplements out in our barn right now and we just haven’t even used them at all. I don’t even think we’ve opened them.

John Dowdy:     Well, and I think it’s important for those tuning in. Obviously, you know your horses better than anybody. And what we always recommend, from a company standpoint, is whatever your horse is on, whatever program they’re on, don’t change anything, just add the Equinety to it. Because you already have a baseline of what these things are doing for your horse. When you add the Equinety to it, you should start seeing changes.

John Dowdy:     In your case, it was seven days on the one horse. But typically most people see changes within 30 days. And at that point you can start maybe bringing them off of some other things or maybe taking them off. And I would say, you tell me how close I am to this, but we get feedback all the time. People are typically saving 20% to 40% in medical bills and other supplements since they started using the Equinety. Is that fairly accurate or would you find that to be accurate?

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Oh, yeah, definitely. We might even be saving a little bit more because my husband would buy three different supplements that we were using, or two different supplements. And I won’t name names, but it’s just less is more for us. We don’t have a lot of time to be going through… It’s time consuming when I go to grain. I get the pans out and you get one scoop of this, and less is more. We don’t want to use a lot of fillers and filling them up on all sorts of stuff. We just have them to be healthy.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            And, you know, the mind is the big thing. That’s the one thing that I’ve really noticed overall. That’s what I like about this Equinety. It wasn’t just that I saw such a big, huge change in the movement, especially with the two that it was pretty obvious were having issues, but just overall their personalities and their minds, it’s just a little quieter.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. And, with that being said, going back, so they’re trailering, they’re more calm when you’re trailering. We have heard of farms that do a lot of boarding and they require everybody to be on Equinety because it seems like everybody’s more in tune. They’re all calmer, they’re happier, they’re more predictable.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah.

John Dowdy:     So I think that’s fantastic.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Well, and our other Subroto horses are also our prospective barrel horses, too, and they’re younger. I haven’t started them on Equinety because there are some concerns with graining one of them, being too hot. So I’ll be having that conversation with the owner about putting them on a program. So what will be interesting is to see the before and after. So I wish I would’ve had all these pictures and stuff, but I can do that. So this’ll be interesting.

John Dowdy:     Sure. Yeah. That’s great. Well, awesome. Well, I tell you what, I appreciate both of you taking the time out of your day to share all these stories. Is there anything else that you’d like to add or put out there for anybody that might be hearing about this for the first time? Any suggestions or anything you might have for them?

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Just try it. You have nothing to lose, believe me. It’s simple and it’s nice and it feels really safe and good for them and healthy. I just love it. I hope to god I can keep getting a tub.

John Dowdy:     Hey, with all the savings, you should be getting three or four tubs now, right?

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. It’s part of our program.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, awesome. Don, anything you’d like to add or say?

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Actually, he just stepped out. He had to go to work.

John Dowdy:     See, he’s like, “I’m out. I’ve been on here long enough.” Well, I appreciate Don. Thank you very much. Don’s out of here. All right.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            You bet.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, yeah. Awesome. Well, I really appreciate you guys, Don and Lisa Schledfeldt, from Yakima, Washington. Thank you so much for taking the time to be on the Equinety podcast.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Oh, you bet. Thank you, John.

John Dowdy:     All right, thank you.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            We really enjoyed it.

John Dowdy:     You bet. All right, bye-bye.

Lisa Schledfeldt:            Bye.

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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  Lisa and Don Schledfeldt 6 Cutting Horses and a Mule John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am excited this week. We are going into the cutting horse world and we're going to swing out to Yakima, Washington,  <br /> <br /> <br /> Lisa and Don Schledfeldt 6 Cutting Horses and a Mule<br /> John Dowdy:     Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am excited this week. We are going into the cutting horse world and we're going to swing out to Yakima, Washington, and I've got Lisa and Don Schledfeldt on the Equinety podcast this week. Lisa and Don, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Don Schledfeldt:           Well, thank you. How are you today?<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     We're doing just great on this side, and Lisa is there with you, as well?<br /> <br /> Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yep. Yep, and we're really excited to be here.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Good. Well, I'm glad to have you. I know y'all are busy people out there, so I appreciate you taking the time. This week we're going to talk about six horses, and what farm isn't complete without a mule.<br /> <br /> Lisa Schledfeldt:            Excellent.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Yeah. So I understand through our pre-call, you're got performance horses, you've got an older mare, you've got some boarding horses and of course your mule. So you've got a wide variety. You also use a lot of supplements through the years. Tell us a little bit about maybe what you've experienced, prior to using Equinety, you've got these performance horses and things. Tell us about, maybe in generic terms, your supplement. You're a fan of supplements, but it seems like there was always something just kind of missing.<br /> <br /> Lisa Schledfeldt:            Yeah, and I'm going to let my husband expand on that because, well, he used a lot of different supplements prior and was always investigating different kinds of supplements.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     And we don't have to go into specifics of names or anything, it's just I kind of want to give everybody, I'm sure there's other people similar, that are feeding a lot of different things and trying to look for stuff that would help. So that's kind of where that question's going.<br /> <br /> Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah, I've kind of researched the supplements through the years, just kind of researching what the horses really need and just that some of the prior supplements, you heard so many good things and there was just about as many bad things about it. And on the Equinety I just noticed that most of the testimonials are all positive, and now I see why, because the results that we've seen over the other supplement, they're a little more outstanding as far as-<br /> <br /> Lisa Schledfeldt:            Movement.<br /> <br /> Don Schledfeldt:           Movement and-<br /> <br /> Lisa Schledfeldt:            Coat.<br /> <br /> Don Schledfeldt:           The coats and the looks of the horse, compared to the other products. I mean, we got some of the shiny coats and that off of some of the other ones, but not to the extent that this has. They really just looked like they came out of a bath now. Yeah, pretty unbelievable.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Yeah. Now, at the time of this recording, well, this one will be published right around the 1st of November, second week of November of 2019 so you guys just started using the Equinety product this year, right around August, September timeframe, end of August, first of September.<br /> <br /> Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah, I think it was right around probably the first or second week of August, we started them on it.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:     Sure. Well, let's go through and we're going to go through, I'll just go down the line here. And so horse number one, Missy, tell us a little bit about Missy, what some of her quirks were or different things that were going on. What were you trying to help her with and then when you added the Equinety, what happened after that?<br /> <br /> Don Schledfeldt:           Yeah, Missy, she's just a real high-caliber cutting horse. She's really, really physical in the pen. She's just full of cow. John Dowdy clean 28:25
036 – Ramona Petrillo – PEFORMANCE HORSES – CRIBBER – Chronic Pain – More Calm – Better Focus – Not Hot anymore – thin shelly hooves – what happens when you stop giving Equinety https://www.teamequinety.com/036-ramona-petrillo-peformance-horses-cribber-chronic-pain-more-calm-better-focus-not-hot-anymore-thin-shelly-hooves-what-happens-when-you-sto/ Wed, 06 Nov 2019 14:00:52 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1781     Ramona Petrillo - PEFORMANCE HORSES - CRIBBER – Chronic Pain – More Calm – Better Focus – Not Hot anymore – thin shelly hooves - what happens when you stop giving Equinety   John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. This week we're going to swing down into Anthony, Florida. We are going to be talking about quite a few critters this week. We've got, well, about eight horses and a Dalmatian. We're going to talk about how Equinety has impacted the lives of these horses and dog. Without further ado, Ramona Petrillo, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Ramona Petrillo:           Thanks, John. Thanks for having me on the show. I'm so excited to talk about Equinety and what it's done for all my animals. John Dowdy:                 That's great. Well, we're glad to have you. Let's start off with a little bit of your background. Well, let's just go all the way back to the beginning, your initial studies. You're a nurse now, so you understand the science and the things, but you've been around horses for many, many years. Let's go back to your initial studies. Ramona Petrillo:           Mkay. Yeah, I rode as a child pretty much just backyard 4-H stuff. I always wanted to be a vet. I first went to college to get my degree in animal science with a concentration in pre-veterinary medicine. I graduated with my bachelor's. I chose instead of going into veterinary school, I had a great opportunity to do some riding and teaching and I chose that route just mainly because I wanted the opportunity to ride and teach and didn't think I could pass that down, thinking that school would always be there. Then I dabbled into teaching. Didn't make as much of a impact as I wanted to on my career and wanted to focus more on my horses and I decided to go back to school for nursing. I am now an ER nurse. John Dowdy:                 You see lots of activity, being an ER nurse. Ramona Petrillo:           Oh, I do see a lot of activity in the ER. John Dowdy:                 Yeah, no doubt. In your spare time, you also are a Magna Wave practitioner? Ramona Petrillo:           Yes. John Dowdy:                 Yep. Then you also do eventing, dressage, and some jumping? Ramona Petrillo:           You got that right. I have three horses. One's an eventer, one does dressage now due to a previous injury, and the other is a showjumper. John Dowdy:                 That's great. Well, I want to get into talking about all three of these horses, maybe what they were dealing with prior to Equinety and then after you started using the product. I think it'd be interesting to talk about Magna Wave and the benefits of Magna Wave, maybe why you picked up on doing that and how that really helps in the body. Maybe just do a little education on the benefits of Magna Wave in general, maybe why should people might should look into that. Ramona Petrillo:           Well, Magna Wave is the brand of pulse electromagnetic field therapy. Can I just say that again? John Dowdy:                 Sure. Ramona Petrillo:           Magna Wave is a brand of pulse electromagnetic field therapy. I have a machine and I go to client's farms and work on their horses and them as well, if they request it. What it does, it helps heal at the cellular level, much like Equinety. I've been involved with Magna Wave for going on a little bit over three years. Going down to the cellular level, each cell has an electromagnetic charge. Inside the cell, it's a negative charge. The extracellular fluid outside of the cell is a positive charge. It's that negative-positive charges that allow for nutrients to flow into the cell, nutrients, oxygen, and then toxins, and waste to exit the cell. When a cell becomes injured, sick, damaged, diseased, whatever, stressed from daily training, the cell tries to heal itself, but it loses its negative charge, so becomes more positive on the inside,

 

 

Ramona Petrillo – PEFORMANCE HORSES – CRIBBER – Chronic Pain – More Calm – Better Focus – Not Hot anymore – thin shelly hooves – what happens when you stop giving Equinety

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. This week we’re going to swing down into Anthony, Florida. We are going to be talking about quite a few critters this week. We’ve got, well, about eight horses and a Dalmatian. We’re going to talk about how Equinety has impacted the lives of these horses and dog. Without further ado, Ramona Petrillo, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Ramona Petrillo:           Thanks, John. Thanks for having me on the show. I’m so excited to talk about Equinety and what it’s done for all my animals.

John Dowdy:                 That’s great. Well, we’re glad to have you. Let’s start off with a little bit of your background. Well, let’s just go all the way back to the beginning, your initial studies. You’re a nurse now, so you understand the science and the things, but you’ve been around horses for many, many years. Let’s go back to your initial studies.

Ramona Petrillo:           Mkay. Yeah, I rode as a child pretty much just backyard 4-H stuff. I always wanted to be a vet. I first went to college to get my degree in animal science with a concentration in pre-veterinary medicine. I graduated with my bachelor’s.

I chose instead of going into veterinary school, I had a great opportunity to do some riding and teaching and I chose that route just mainly because I wanted the opportunity to ride and teach and didn’t think I could pass that down, thinking that school would always be there.

Then I dabbled into teaching. Didn’t make as much of a impact as I wanted to on my career and wanted to focus more on my horses and I decided to go back to school for nursing. I am now an ER nurse.

John Dowdy:                 You see lots of activity, being an ER nurse.

Ramona Petrillo:           Oh, I do see a lot of activity in the ER.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, no doubt. In your spare time, you also are a Magna Wave practitioner?

Ramona Petrillo:           Yes.

John Dowdy:                 Yep. Then you also do eventing, dressage, and some jumping?

Ramona Petrillo:           You got that right. I have three horses. One’s an eventer, one does dressage now due to a previous injury, and the other is a showjumper.

John Dowdy:                 That’s great. Well, I want to get into talking about all three of these horses, maybe what they were dealing with prior to Equinety and then after you started using the product. I think it’d be interesting to talk about Magna Wave and the benefits of Magna Wave, maybe why you picked up on doing that and how that really helps in the body. Maybe just do a little education on the benefits of Magna Wave in general, maybe why should people might should look into that.

Ramona Petrillo:           Well, Magna Wave is the brand of pulse electromagnetic field therapy. Can I just say that again?

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Ramona Petrillo:           Magna Wave is a brand of pulse electromagnetic field therapy. I have a machine and I go to client’s farms and work on their horses and them as well, if they request it. What it does, it helps heal at the cellular level, much like Equinety. I’ve been involved with Magna Wave for going on a little bit over three years.

Going down to the cellular level, each cell has an electromagnetic charge. Inside the cell, it’s a negative charge. The extracellular fluid outside of the cell is a positive charge. It’s that negative-positive charges that allow for nutrients to flow into the cell, nutrients, oxygen, and then toxins, and waste to exit the cell.

When a cell becomes injured, sick, damaged, diseased, whatever, stressed from daily training, the cell tries to heal itself, but it loses its negative charge, so becomes more positive on the inside, which means that it can’t get the nutrients and oxygen that it needs and neither can it expel the waste and toxins that have built up inside of it. Then eventually, the cell dies.

Each pulse of the Magna Wave coils sends an electromagnetic charge through the body where the cells that need it pick it up, are able to recharge themselves, and get back to healing. It also recruits STEM cells to come up and become a tissue, such as if you tore a ligament or tendon, they’ll call it up and help repair and build down new ligament tissue to repair itself. It increases circulation, increases oxygenation, detoxifies, helps remove toxins and waste from the body and all that at the cellular level.

John Dowdy:                 That’s incredible. When we’re talking about the Equinety product, which is a 100% pure amino acids and these amino acids, they’re specifically formulated or put together in this stack to stimulate the pituitary gland, which last week, if you tune in, we’ve got an almost an hour of a podcast talking about the real more in depth around the science of amino acids and how it works at a cellular level.

Essentially, what it’s doing is it stimulates the pituitary to release the unnecessary hormones, which then help repair and regenerate at a cellular level. In combination with using the Equinety with a Magna Wave is very, very powerful.

Maybe you could tell people that are tuning in, you’ve been doing the Magna Wave for quite a while: What have you experienced since adding the Equinety to the Magna Wave?

Ramona Petrillo:           Well, since adding the Equinety to the Magna Wave, since the Equinety helps heal at the cellular level as well, which will make the horses feel better all over. The Magna Wave, when I go out, before I do each horse, I go over their body on the lowest setting. That’s one of the fabulous things about the Magna Wave therapy is that you can detect where they’re sore, reactive, tight by on the lowest setting going across the body and the areas that are tight or sore will react; they’ll pulse a little bit more so than the areas that aren’t.

Not only on my own horses, but on all my clients’ horses that have been using Equinety now, I’ve noticed that every time when I go out to Magna Wave them, I’m picking up less sore, less tight, less reactive areas, which just tells me that, and their training hasn’t changed, it’s in fact because these horses are feeling fabulous and a lot of them are gearing up for the big Jockey Club competition down here in November. They’re training harder, they’re galloping more often, longer distances, faster speeds, jumping bigger jumps. They’re feeling better in their bodies since adding the Equinety to the Magna Wave.

John Dowdy:                 That’s great. Anybody tuning in, might be a nice combination for you to try. We’ve heard nothing but great things about Magna Wave. I think, if memory serves me correctly, this might be the first podcast we’ve had to actually explain what the Magna Wave does. I just think it’s important and beneficial when you use the Equinety in combination with things.

Now, in your business you are primarily in, we’ll say the higher-end type of performance forms. Would that be somewhat accurate?

Ramona Petrillo:           Yes, I do a lot of upper-level event horses and dressage horses.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. One of the things with the Equinety product, we found that whether it be a rescue horse, a pasture ornament, performance horse, or you get into these high-end performance horse barns where a lot of them are getting the creme de la creme, the best of the feed, the care, and everything else. Then you add the Equinety and they’re still seeing the benefits because, well, they need amino acids. That’s really great.

Well, let’s get right into talking about your three horses. We’ll start off with the first one, which I believe is Daisy. Tell us a little bit about what was going on with Daisy prior to using the Equinety and then what you’ve experienced since adding the Equinety to it.

Actually, prior to that, how were you first introduced to Equinety? What were your thoughts when you first saw the product? Maybe tell us a little bit about that and then get into Daisy.

Ramona Petrillo:           Well, interestingly enough, I was introduced to Equinety by one of my Magna Wave clients. They use Equinety and had samples. She gave me a little tub, a sample tub to try on my eventer for the dressage phase, hoping that it would help relax them and get our dressage scores better. They’re a dressage trainer, so that was their thought that, “Hey, try this on him. Maybe he’ll relax a little bit in the dressage arena.”

I came home and decided, “Well, I have a good test subject to try this on.” Daisy is, she is a chestnut off-the-track thoroughbred mare with four whirls on her forehead, so she’s extra evil. She really is a sweetheart, but she is a very reactive, high-strung horse. She never just would settle down to work. It would always be at least 20-30 minutes of riding out every buck, rear, spin, taking off before she would be able to calm down and focus and get to work. Then you would just hope that you could just contain the explosiveness to get through whatever you were doing for the show.

She used to be an eventer, but she did have a big injury to her right front leg three years ago, almost four years ago, so now we just do straight dressage. Because of that injury, we didn’t think that she would ever be pasture sound, so the fact that she is able to be ridden for dressage is a blessing, thanks to Magna Wave, to repair that leg.

Because of her injury, and now that she’s exceeded our expectations about being pasture sound and I’m able to ride her for her dressage, she would need to be on anti-inflammatory, so she was on Previcox longterm. Which then in turn, even though it’s gentler on the stomach, it causes some belly issues.

I wanted to try it on her, the Equinety, and see if that made a difference, because like I said, she was always reactive. Four days of trying that and not, I was like, “Well, I’ve tried everything with this mare. I doubt this is going to make a difference, but I was given it. Let’s just go with it.”

After four days, this went from a horse that hated to be brushed or touched and would try to kick out or nip you to one that loved being curried. I mean, the harder you curried her now, the better she felt. She was loving it. You could touch her, she was less reactive, her muscles became softer. When you’re brushing her, instead of tensing up and hollowing out her back, her muscles were soft. I stopped having to give her anti-inflammatories and she’s been sounder.

John Dowdy:                 This happened in four days?

Ramona Petrillo:           In four days. She stopped cribbing. She’s a cribber; she would crib in her stall, she would crib at the wash stall. After four days, I’m hosing her off and I’m noticing, I was standing there at the wash stall, which is wood, and she’s not cribbing on the wood.

John Dowdy:                 Wow.

Ramona Petrillo:           I’m thinking, “Huh.” Then it all like started coming together. I’m like, “She’s been quieter to ride. She hasn’t been explosive. She’s not cribbing and she loves being groomed and she’s just softer all over.”

I used the Equinety; it was a 15-day supply and then I ran out. I thought, “I’m not going to go out and get it right away. I’m going to see what happens.”

Sure enough, two days of being off the Equinety, she hated being touched again, her back got all tight, she started cribbing. I ran out on my lunch break at work and got the Equinety and started her back up on it. Then literally within a week, she was back to being the soft-backed Daisy. That’s when I called you and told you what a wonderful thing I thought this was.

John Dowdy:                 Right. Now, I think this would be good point to answer. I’ll ask my own question: Why does a horse have that kind of a reaction from a complete demeanor change by adding the Equinety and then you run out and then they go back to the way that they were doing?

Well, the reason why this is happening is because the hormones that are released have a 23-and-a-half-hour life cycle. Typically, we’ve heard a lot of stories of people, either one doing a test like you’ve just described, or they’ll think, “Well, I’m just going to use the product to help heal my horse. Then once they’re all sound, then I’ll just stop using the product.”

The challenge is is once the hormones are released, they have a 23-and-a-half-hour life cycle and then the hormone levels go back to the way that they were prior to using the Equinety. This is why the horse typically will revert back to the way they were doing before the Equinety. I’m glad you brought that up, because that’s why that typically happens. I would guess to say that she has not been off her Equinety since?

Ramona Petrillo:           No, nobody is coming off of Equinety.

John Dowdy:                 Okay, how is she doing these days with performing?

Ramona Petrillo:           She is doing fabulous. Things have been going so well. In August, I took her to a dressage show. She hadn’t been off the farm in two years. Prior, I would have to always tie a red ribbon in her tail to warn people not to come near us because she could be very explosive off the trailer. I mean, I would typically have to lunge her. Of course, I was running just a bit behind and got there with just enough time to tack up and warm up without being able to lunge.

I did not expect to have a successful go. I knew that she would be just hot coming off the trailer, new surroundings, hasn’t been off the farm in two years.

Well, I pulled in, dropped down the ramp, she stuck her head out, looked around, took a sigh, came off the ramp, and started eating grass. There was no show going on with her athletic abilities.

John Dowdy:                 Whoa.

Ramona Petrillo:           I tacked her up and decided, “Well, let’s just see what I got.” Literally, 15 minutes of warmup and we walked into the ring and she was as calm and supple and focused as anything.

John Dowdy:                 You’re probably thinking, “Okay, did I bring the right horse?” Is this the …?

Ramona Petrillo:           Exactly. I did not know how to ride her in the arena because I’ve never had that horse in the arena. I mean, I had always been dealing with just trying to keep a lid on the pressure cooker. Here I had a horse that was so relaxed. I’m like, “I feel like I need to kick, but do I?”

John Dowdy:                 Oh, wow. That’s pretty awesome. That is pretty awesome. Since you then experienced the results with Equinety on Daisy, then you decided to try it on Dublin, so tell us about Dublin.

Ramona Petrillo:           I did. Dublin, he’s a 16-year-old thoroughbred Connemara gelding. He is owned by a very dear friend of mine and I graciously get the ride on him. He’s done upper-level eventing. We’ve always struggled together with our dressage. He’s always been a little bit funny about the dressage arena, wanting to look around.

Since starting him on Equinety, it took a while. I didn’t see the results as quickly as I did with Daisy, but I just felt that I needed to stick with it because I knew the results I had with Daisy, it wasn’t just a one-shot thing. I felt that just maybe his problems, and every horse is unique, I mean, just like people, sometimes you respond quickly to something and sometimes you have to stay with the program. I mean, anybody who tries to lose weight, that’s them.

John Dowdy:                 No doubt.

Ramona Petrillo:           I mean, sometimes you have to stick with it a little bit longer.

John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Ramona Petrillo:           I just stuck with the Equinety and it really took about two months before I started seeing changes in him where he became more focused in the arena. His topline is just blossoming. He’s getting all new muscle, correct muscle through the top of his neck and over his back, which, because now that he has the proper amino acids, I mean, I feel like these, especially the upper-level horses that exert a lot of energy, they need that extra amino acid that might not be found in their diets to help support that protein synthesis to build the muscle.

John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Ramona Petrillo:           Now that he has that, he’s been able to build the proper muscling, which not only has helped with our dressage, but has helped with our jumping because his form and his shape over a fence is so much better.

John Dowdy:                 Wow. He’s 16 now?

Ramona Petrillo:           Yes, mm-hmm (affirmative).

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, but acting much younger.

Ramona Petrillo:           Yes, he feels like he’s six.

John Dowdy:                 I think it’s important to point out for those tuning in: In your first horse, you noticed a significant difference in four days on this little sample tub. The little sample tub we have is 15 days, so a lot of people purchase that just to see if it’s palatable, which we’re going to be talking about nine animals here. Have you had any palatability issues?

Ramona Petrillo:           No. If I did have a palatability issue, it would be with either Daisy or Lola, especially Lola since she didn’t clean up her feed at all before starting her on Equinety.

John Dowdy:                 Right, and we’ll get into Lola next, but the thing that I think is important here, with Daisy, you noticed a significant difference in four days. When it came to Dublin, you didn’t really start seeing a difference for about 60 days. But really, the muscle tone and the really filling out with the muscle didn’t happen for about four months, so you’re already through a whole tub.

We’ve heard every now and then people say, “Oh, I went through a whole tub and I didn’t see anything,” and then they just stopped. What would be your feedback or recommendation for somebody that’s experiencing a similar scenario?

Ramona Petrillo:           I would recommend giving it a good six months. I mean, I had results in four months, but I think that just like I mentioned earlier, everybody responds a little bit differently. I think if they just stuck with it for at least four to six months, they would not be disappointed.

John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative). No, and I would say the vast majority, I’m thinking in the high 90 percentile do see a difference within 30 days or less. That’s very, very, very common. It’s very uncommon to go beyond 30 days, but there are those scenarios. I would agree with you, stick with it. I mean, they are amino acids, they are the building blocks of protein and they have to work, I mean, there’s no other use for them but to be the building blocks’ protein.

Okay, let’s get into Lola, your third horse here. What was going on with her prior to Equinety and then what happened?

Ramona Petrillo:           Lola is another off-the-track thoroughbred mare. She is not explosive like Daisy. In fact, she’s the complete opposite, which she internalizes all of her stress, which can cause upset bellies, decreased performance.

It got to the point where her and I were just having so many bad rides together and her performance decreased so much and it made it a little difficult to go out to shows and have her internalize all that stress and anxiety and not have her perform well that I basically, I was busy enough with Dublin and Daisy that I just stopped riding her.

I had other people give it a go and see if they could help us out and train her and take her to shows, but the same thing, she was still internalizing all that stress from the atmosphere and the training that she would just not perform.

Then when I saw the results of Daisy and then started seeing the results with Dublin, I started her on the Equinety as well. Since she’s been on the Equinety, she has been cleaning up her food, which she never used to. I mean, she’d always leave something in her bucket and sometimes it would be more than half of her ration, which she only gets three pounds three times a day. She wouldn’t clean up her. She would just kind of hang out.

Since starting her on the Equinety, she’s been eaten everything and she filled out, she’s fat and shiny. The best part about it is that I ended up riding her again at the end of July and not really having much hope for the two of us and she’s just been getting better and better. In fact, the two of us have been going so well together that we’re going back to the showroom.

John Dowdy:                 That is awesome. I’m sure she’s happy about that. She’s getting her job back, less stressed.

Ramona Petrillo:           Yes, I think she is, yeah.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah.

Ramona Petrillo:           Less stress and she must be feeling better.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, obviously. Yeah, for sure. Let’s go to a little bit smaller animal. Tell us about your 10-year-old Dalmatian. What was going on with him? Which, by the way, these are amino acids and since the pituitary is roughly the same size in mammals, about the size of a pea, a dog would get the same dosage as a big draft horse. Tell us what was going on with your dog.

Ramona Petrillo:           Eli’s my 10-year-old Dalmatian. Last year, we got a puppy and Eli thought he was a puppy and would play very rough and run around the house, jumping over the couch. We don’t jump on the couch. I mean, we jump over the couch. Thinks he’s a puppy.

John Dowdy:                 He was watching your jumping horses.

Ramona Petrillo:           He was. There were plenty of times I would look at him and be like, “I wish I could put a saddle on this one.”

John Dowdy:                 Yeah.

Ramona Petrillo:           Then after about six months of having the puppy around, he started slowing down. He would not walk on the wood floors. His hind end would give out. I mean, he just looked super uncomfortable. I started him on hip and bone joint supplements.

Then he got a little bit better, but still didn’t want to play, was still very cautious about walking on the wood floors, would literally walk, we have area rugs, so he would take a couple of steps, go from one area rug to the other even if it meant the long way to getting out the door.

When I saw the difference in my horses, I decided to put Eli on Equinety. Here’s another one that could be very finicky about his food. Since being on the Equinety, he’s been on it about three weeks no, he is back to playing with the puppy, chasing him around the house. He’s able to jump up on the bed and sleep with us, which I prefer. It’s great to see him happy and be able to run again as a 10-year-old.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. That’s awesome. As you started seeing the results with your personal horses and your dog, and of course, then you have clients that, although they are benefiting from Magna Wave, but you know what adding the Equinety can do for them, so you started handing out strategically a few samples.

We’ll run through these real quick. We’ve got, what, about five client horses? Let’s go right into the first one, which is a level four eventer. What was going on with this one and then what’d you find by adding the Equinety?

Ramona Petrillo:           This horse, she did events at the upper levels. Prior to becoming a client, she had some injuries, some unsoundness, was just a little bit hard to keep sound without a lot of injections and interventions, which can get quite costly.

John Dowdy:                 Right.

Ramona Petrillo:           She was another tight one, tight in her back with the Magna Wave; could be very reactive. I suggested, I was like, “Whoa. I just got this product. I’ve tried it on Daisy. Her and Daisy are quite similar with the tightness and the unsoundness.” I was like, “Give it a go. See what you think.” I mean, this was getting to the point where her owner was contemplating just having her as a pasture pet because she couldn’t keep her sound enough to compete.

Since she started her on the Equinety, she’s just been sounder and sounder and she’s back in training, getting ready to show this winter season.

She has another mare that was very finicky about her food. She would literally have to stand there. If she didn’t stand there and hand-feed her, the mare wouldn’t eat. She started her on Equinety and now that mare is eating, gaining better weight, finishing up all of her food, which obviously frees up time if you don’t have to hand-feed a horse three meals a day.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, and the chickens were benefiting prior to this as well, I understand?

Ramona Petrillo:           Yes, the chickens were. Now they serve them some other foods so they have [crosstalk 00:27:01] to eat.

John Dowdy:                 Oh, man. Wow. Both of these horses were the first client. Now I think it would be beneficial at this point, too, now we’ve gone through five different horses and a dog and they’ve all had different types of things going on with them. Outside of everything that you are currently doing for them, all you did extra was just add the Equinety and it’s affected them all in very positive ways, but all very differently because they all had different needs.

Ramona Petrillo:           Right, yes.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, this is one of the great things with the Equinety product because we’re actually giving the horse what it needs to release its own hormones and then the body’s deciding where to send those hormones for the healing. It’s customizing to each horse, which is pretty awesome, I would say. Okay-

Ramona Petrillo:           Yes, I am… Oh.

John Dowdy:                 … Yeah, you go ahead.

Ramona Petrillo:           I’m absolutely amazed at what I am finding with not only my own horses, but my client’s horses as well because I go out there and Magna Wave them. Most everybody is on a weekly schedule, if not an every-other-week schedule. What I’m finding with the horses that have been receiving the Equinety that every time I go out, they’re just getting better and better through their bodies; softer, less reactive. The only thing that’s changed is the Equinety being added to their program.

John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative), yeah. Right. Okay, the next one here is an off-the-track gelding by the name of Cole, who I understand had a lot of tension at shows, but also, although this wouldn’t be effective or because of a show, just had poor hooves. Tell us a little bit about Cole.

Ramona Petrillo:           Yeah, Cole’s another off-the-track thoroughbred. He was always very tense at shows, tense in the dressage arena, spooky with jumping, just being an off-the-track thoroughbred or just being a thoroughbred, he had his typical little thoroughbred feet that would fall apart pretty easily.

He’s another client of the Magna Wave. I just said, “Hey, why don’t you try this for Cole? See if it helps him like it helped Daisy with her tension.”

She tried him on it and sure enough, he’s gotten more relaxed, she’s been getting the best dressage scores she’s had on him. He’s gotten rounder and his feet haven’t been falling apart, he’s actually been able to hold onto shoes and his feet have been looking great. She started back in, I would say July, so it’s been a good three months.

John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative), yep. Yeah. The hoof quality is probably one of the most common things that we hear as well among all the other things. Yeah, we’ve been receiving a lot of feedback and pictures before and after pictures with the hooves, so that’s great, which actually leads us right into the next one, which also had some hoof issues and also challenges gaining weight. Tell us about this one.

Ramona Petrillo:           Yeah, another off-the-track thoroughbred. We eventers love our off-the-track thoroughbreds; nothing better than galloping a thoroughbred around that cross-country course.

John Dowdy:                 Right.

Ramona Petrillo:           She got him off-the-track. They’re fit athletes. They do require a little downtime getting used a new program, new environment. He came in quite thin with thin shelly hooves and she started him on it when she saw my Facebook post. She messaged me because she’s up in Michigan and she asked me about my experiences with the Equinety. I promptly sent her a little sample packets in the mail and said, “Try this. You have to try this. This is the game changer.”

Sure enough, she went out after she ran through a sample pack and got some more and he’s been on it and she says that he’s just plumped right out, calm, relaxed, easy to transition into, he’s starting his new career as an eventer. His feet are fabulous.

John Dowdy:                 That’s great. Now again, customizing to the horse and we get into, let me guess, another off-the-track thoroughbred mare this time?

Ramona Petrillo:           Yes. Yep, yes.

John Dowdy:                 Tell us about this super athletic but very tense, over-reactive to new surroundings and explosive, as you put it.

Ramona Petrillo:           Yes. Well, Rogue is Rogue; that’s the mare’s name, so she lives up to it. She’s super talented and her owner is such a young, talented rider that has just not given up on her. She was quite the handful when she came down and started in the program. I started Magna Waving her in hopes of relaxing her back muscles; super tense, tight horse. She has a little bit of cycle issue as well, which doesn’t help the whole back tightness and soreness.

Just being a regular Magna Wave client, I introduced her to the Equinety as well and she has just turned, I mean, like that. Very similar results to Daisy, just immediately relaxing and becoming softer through her body, more tolerant of being groomed, relaxed at shows, not as explosive. Now her owner loves riding her.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah.

Ramona Petrillo:           And they’re able to. The best part about it is as they relax their body and have the proper muscling able to develop and support whatever needed extra support through their system, whether it is their belly. Are they having gastric issues that you can’t pinpoint or some soreness somewhere or just relaxation in the mind? Once all of that starts to happen, then you’re able to train and accomplish steps and goals because then you have a willing partner.

John Dowdy:                 Yes, yep. Everybody feels better and the rider, as a rider, you’re happier and more relaxed yourself, which translates down into the horse.

You know what? We’ve heard of a lot of people dealing with mystery lameness issues. I think if you’re tuning in listening to this and you’re dealing with some sort of a mystery lameness, you’ve tried all kinds of different things and nothing really seems to be pinpointing what the real issue is, give the Equinety a try because again, we’re giving the body what it needs to release hormones and then the body is sending those hormones with pinpoint accuracy. The body knows where it needs to be healed. This is the great thing about this product.

Now we go into, and I just noticed, I missed this one when I was saying, “Hey, we had nine,” but I think we’ve got one more horse here that was dealing with a lot of tension in the ring. Tell us about this mare.

Ramona Petrillo:           Yes, she was an open jumper. She came from another program and they overfaced her when she was quite young. Because she had such an athletic jump, they just kept on going higher and higher and she didn’t have the proper muscling training at that stage of her training to support the bigger jumps. Mentally or physically, she just wasn’t prepared to be jumping that high over and over and over and especially in a show environment. Unfortunately, sometimes when you had to try her in the wrong hands, that’s what happens.

John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Ramona Petrillo:           They just keep on racing the jumps and you go a little too fast too quick and it was too much for her mind. She ended up having a lot of anxiety and training issues, confidence issues because when they’re young like that and if you ask too much too soon and they scare themselves, well, that could just totally ruin the horse.

Then my client ended up getting her for a really cheap price because the mare would not jump and slowly started just breaking it all down starting from the basics again.

She’s been competing in the open jumpers with my client, but she just always felt that she was anxious. She could still feel a little bit of that tension and she didn’t want to push her and she did let her have her time, but she just felt like she just needed a little extra help to relax in the arena and in the training so that she could progress, so started her on Equinety and she has become more focused and less anxious about her training, which then translates into better performances in the show ring.

John Dowdy:                 That is great. Well, there we have it. We’ve got quite a plethora of examples here of how Equinety can help and in combination with a Magna Wave has found to work really, really well.

Well, Ramona, I really appreciate you taking the time out of your day. I know you’re very busy with nursing and riding and Magna Waving. Where do you have all the time?

Ramona Petrillo:           Yeah, I know.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Well, awesome. Well, Ramona Petrillo from Anthony, Florida, thank you so much for taking the time to be on the Equinety podcast.

Ramona Petrillo:           Well, thanks for having me, John, and thanks for such an amazing product.

John Dowdy:                 Well, you’re very welcome. We’re blessed. I’m not the mastermind behind it, but hey, I’m helping to get it out there, so we appreciate you supporting us and again, sharing your Equinety stories. Thanks again.

Ramona Petrillo:           Thank you.

John Dowdy:                 You bet. Bye-bye.

Ramona Petrillo:           Bye.

 

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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  -   Ramona Petrillo - PEFORMANCE HORSES - CRIBBER – Chronic Pain – More Calm – Better Focus – Not Hot anymore – thin shelly hooves - what happens when you stop giving Equinety   - John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety ...  <br /> <br />  <br /> Ramona Petrillo - PEFORMANCE HORSES - CRIBBER – Chronic Pain – More Calm – Better Focus – Not Hot anymore – thin shelly hooves - what happens when you stop giving Equinety<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. This week we're going to swing down into Anthony, Florida. We are going to be talking about quite a few critters this week. We've got, well, about eight horses and a Dalmatian. We're going to talk about how Equinety has impacted the lives of these horses and dog. Without further ado, Ramona Petrillo, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Ramona Petrillo:           Thanks, John. Thanks for having me on the show. I'm so excited to talk about Equinety and what it's done for all my animals.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 That's great. Well, we're glad to have you. Let's start off with a little bit of your background. Well, let's just go all the way back to the beginning, your initial studies. You're a nurse now, so you understand the science and the things, but you've been around horses for many, many years. Let's go back to your initial studies.<br /> <br /> Ramona Petrillo:           Mkay. Yeah, I rode as a child pretty much just backyard 4-H stuff. I always wanted to be a vet. I first went to college to get my degree in animal science with a concentration in pre-veterinary medicine. I graduated with my bachelor's.<br /> <br /> I chose instead of going into veterinary school, I had a great opportunity to do some riding and teaching and I chose that route just mainly because I wanted the opportunity to ride and teach and didn't think I could pass that down, thinking that school would always be there.<br /> <br /> Then I dabbled into teaching. Didn't make as much of a impact as I wanted to on my career and wanted to focus more on my horses and I decided to go back to school for nursing. I am now an ER nurse.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 You see lots of activity, being an ER nurse.<br /> <br /> Ramona Petrillo:           Oh, I do see a lot of activity in the ER.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yeah, no doubt. In your spare time, you also are a Magna Wave practitioner?<br /> <br /> Ramona Petrillo:           Yes.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yep. Then you also do eventing, dressage, and some jumping?<br /> <br /> Ramona Petrillo:           You got that right. I have three horses. One's an eventer, one does dressage now due to a previous injury, and the other is a showjumper.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 That's great. Well, I want to get into talking about all three of these horses, maybe what they were dealing with prior to Equinety and then after you started using the product. I think it'd be interesting to talk about Magna Wave and the benefits of Magna Wave, maybe why you picked up on doing that and how that really helps in the body. Maybe just do a little education on the benefits of Magna Wave in general, maybe why should people might should look into that.<br /> <br /> Ramona Petrillo:           Well, Magna Wave is the brand of pulse electromagnetic field therapy. Can I just say that again?<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Sure.<br /> <br /> Ramona Petrillo:           Magna Wave is a brand of pulse electromagnetic field therapy. I have a machine and I go to client's farms and work on their horses and them as well, if they request it. What it does, it helps heal at the cellular level, much like Equinety. I've been involved with Magna Wave for going on a little bit over three years.<br /> <br /> Going down to the cellular level, each cell has an electromagnetic charge. Inside the cell, it's a negative charge. The extracellular fluid outside of the cell is a positive charge. It's that negative-positive charges that allow for nutrients to flow into the cell, nutrients, oxygen, and then toxins, and waste to exit the cell.<br /> John Dowdy clean 38:13
035 – Dr Charlyn Belluzo – The Science of Amino Acids – How they work at a cellular level – The Benefits of Long Term – Belos Cavalos Therapy Farm https://www.teamequinety.com/035-dr-charlyn-belluzo-the-science-of-amino-acids-how-they-work-at-a-cellular-level-the-benefits-of-long-term-belos-cavalos-therapy-farm/ Wed, 30 Oct 2019 13:00:59 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1776   Dr Charlyn Belluzo - The Science of Amino Acids – How they work at a cellular level – The Benefits of Long Term - Belos Cavalos Therapy Farm   John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. I am so excited for this podcast this week. We've been trying to coordinate this for quite a few months now. Before we jump into it, if this is your first time listening in on our podcast, and maybe this is the first time you've heard about the Equinety Product, I'm going to give you a quick background on what it is and then we'll get into our guest today. This product actually started back in 1998 as a anti-aging youth formula for the 50+ crowd. Dr. Philip White, who's British, Cambridge and Harvard educated family physician, and head of the hospital for 35+ years in Canada, was able to figure out the combination of amino acids to stimulate the pituitary gland. Which then releases the necessary hormones, which help heal the body at a cellular level. That was 1998. We skipped forward to 2014, and we put the same formula in a tub and called it Equinety, so we could market it to the horse industry. If you're looking around on Facebook and hearing people talk about it, it's quite an amazing product. We are definitely blessed. The reason I'm so excited today is our guest today, Dr. Charlyn Belluzo out of California. I'm going to give you an intro here. Grab a cup of coffee because it's a long intro, but that's okay because this is so exciting. All right, here we go. Dr. Charlyn, internationally recognized as a global health expert in both business and nonprofit sectors. She has expertise in population wellness, medical research, regulatory affairs, strategic planning, marketing and operational management, just to name a few. Her professional passion has been to promote human health and wellness, strengthen communities, generate economic prosperity, and enrich the lives of the world's most vulnerable. She holds doctorate degrees of public health in tropical medicine and preventative health. Holds a masters degree of business administration and completed postgraduate training and a medical fellowship in HIV/AIDS research, managing international clinical trials and authoring new drug applications for regulatory drug approval. To fill in the extra time in her life, and one of the main reasons why we have her on the call today, is because she has an equine therapy nonprofit that does amazing work with among other things, trauma victims. When she first learned about the Equinety product around 2015 timeframe and saw the amino acids, she knew exactly what Dr. White was doing with this, and how it was going to help the body. Without further ado, Dr. Charlyn Belluzo, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Dr Charlyn Belluzo         I am delighted to be here. Thank you so much for the invitation. John Dowdy:                 Well, we are happy to have you. I know there's been a lot of questions come in, and so we're just going to pick your brain if that's okay with you. Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Fabulous. Let's get started. John Dowdy:                 We're talking about amino acids and we're going to get into a bit of the science. There seems to be a lot of education that I guess would need to happen with a lot of people out there. They're just not familiar with amino acids. I thought this would be a great way to help them get educated. We've got a lot of educational things on our website, but there's no better substitute than to have somebody that really understands from a medical standpoint. Although your background is been more on the human side, I think as we get through this, people understand how it can translate right over into the horse world. One of the things that we were talking about, what's your take on the physiology standpoint, with how complicated humans and horses are and the evolution of all of this? What's your take on all that? Dr Charlyn Belluzo         This is really an impo...

 

Dr Charlyn Belluzo – The Science of Amino Acids – How they work at a cellular level –
The Benefits of Long Term – Belos Cavalos Therapy Farm

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. I am so excited for this podcast this week. We’ve been trying to coordinate this for quite a few months now. Before we jump into it, if this is your first time listening in on our podcast, and maybe this is the first time you’ve heard about the Equinety Product, I’m going to give you a quick background on what it is and then we’ll get into our guest today. This product actually started back in 1998 as a anti-aging youth formula for the 50+ crowd. Dr. Philip White, who’s British, Cambridge and Harvard educated family physician, and head of the hospital for 35+ years in Canada, was able to figure out the combination of amino acids to stimulate the pituitary gland. Which then releases the necessary hormones, which help heal the body at a cellular level. That was 1998.

We skipped forward to 2014, and we put the same formula in a tub and called it Equinety, so we could market it to the horse industry. If you’re looking around on Facebook and hearing people talk about it, it’s quite an amazing product. We are definitely blessed. The reason I’m so excited today is our guest today, Dr. Charlyn Belluzo out of California. I’m going to give you an intro here. Grab a cup of coffee because it’s a long intro, but that’s okay because this is so exciting. All right, here we go. Dr. Charlyn, internationally recognized as a global health expert in both business and nonprofit sectors. She has expertise in population wellness, medical research, regulatory affairs, strategic planning, marketing and operational management, just to name a few. Her professional passion has been to promote human health and wellness, strengthen communities, generate economic prosperity, and enrich the lives of the world’s most vulnerable.

She holds doctorate degrees of public health in tropical medicine and preventative health. Holds a masters degree of business administration and completed postgraduate training and a medical fellowship in HIV/AIDS research, managing international clinical trials and authoring new drug applications for regulatory drug approval. To fill in the extra time in her life, and one of the main reasons why we have her on the call today, is because she has an equine therapy nonprofit that does amazing work with among other things, trauma victims. When she first learned about the Equinety product around 2015 timeframe and saw the amino acids, she knew exactly what Dr. White was doing with this, and how it was going to help the body. Without further ado, Dr. Charlyn Belluzo, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         I am delighted to be here. Thank you so much for the invitation.

John Dowdy:                 Well, we are happy to have you. I know there’s been a lot of questions come in, and so we’re just going to pick your brain if that’s okay with you.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Fabulous. Let’s get started.

John Dowdy:                 We’re talking about amino acids and we’re going to get into a bit of the science. There seems to be a lot of education that I guess would need to happen with a lot of people out there. They’re just not familiar with amino acids. I thought this would be a great way to help them get educated. We’ve got a lot of educational things on our website, but there’s no better substitute than to have somebody that really understands from a medical standpoint. Although your background is been more on the human side, I think as we get through this, people understand how it can translate right over into the horse world. One of the things that we were talking about, what’s your take on the physiology standpoint, with how complicated humans and horses are and the evolution of all of this? What’s your take on all that?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         This is really an important foundational conversation for this discussion today. Because the world as all of you have experienced, has accelerated at a rate that is astronomical. That technologies and our lifestyle, and just the way that we live, has so accelerated to the point that lots of us are feeling the changes physiologically and emotionally. Those very same things are happening to our horses. One thing that’s to remember is, humans and horses and most mammal creatures evolve very, very slowly. It would take centuries of time for us to physiologically be able to catch up with the demands and the lifestyles that we’ve created for ourselves and for our horses. What I want to emphasize is health is really your cells at the molecular level in perfect balance.

What we’re going to talk about a lot today is how do we, in this world of massive change, and the way that we go about our own lives, as well as the way that we engage with our horses, how can we help through our nutrition, and through our habits to help our bodies and at a cellular level, at that molecular level, be in better balance? When you think about how a horse started in early times of history, and they traveled in herds. They spent days with their heads down, grazing small bites throughout the entire day. They had spaces that when they were stimulated to do so, that they could take off and run without enclosures. That they could move as a herd, and they could work out their own dynamics. Out of love and out of necessity, we’ve brought horses into a realm that is much, much different than it was designed to be.

We’re keeping our horses in contained areas. We feed them in a different way quite often. There are very few horses that get to live engaged with humans, in the lifestyle in which they were designed. The best thing that we can do out of love and necessity to have horses in our lives, is help to balance their nutrition and their lifestyles by giving them what might give them the most optimal health. I think that one thing to consider is, it’s not just what we feed them, but it’s how we’re feeding them. Oftentimes in the situations that our horses must be in, they get fed twice or maybe three times a day, a larger quantity.

They’re not designed necessarily to be that. What can we do from a nutritional basis, to help their systems balance, as if they had those supplies of nutrients throughout the day? Those are some of the things we’re going to talk about little later in this talk. Ways that we can care for ourselves and for our horses in the light of change. Knowing that physiologically we can’t evolve quick enough to keep up with the demands that contemporary life has put on us.

John Dowdy:                 That makes a perfect sense. Although the topic of full nutrition is a whole topic in and of itself. We’re going to narrow this down just to the importance of what we’re talking about with Equinety and that’s amino acids, which we have found to be so powerful. Now being on the market in the equine industry for a little over four years. Hearing people every single day, and it doesn’t matter what part of the country they’re in, or what caliber per se of horse, whether it’s at a high end dressage jumping barn or a rescue horse or pasture ornament. This particular stack of amino acids, it seems to help all of them. Which we have concluded I mean horses in general seem to be deficient in the right amount of amino acids. What’s your take on that?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         May I give you just a slight primer on amino acids themselves. I know this is on your website, but amino acids are the building blocks of protein. But those proteins are found in plants, animals and people. Amino acids in themselves are a very basic element that has been around since the beginning of animals and man and most creatures. What they do mainly for us that is the most important, and also for our animal friends and particularly our horses in this conversation, is they maintain muscle mass. An example of maintaining muscle mass is the proteins make up all muscle in our body, including our organs. A lot of the connective tissue is protein.

Amino acids are as the building block of proteins, regulate blood sugar. They aid in energy improvement, they heal wounds, they’re for repairing tissue, for memory and concentration, stress alleviation. Like I said, they’re that element that helps the cells to function at the greatest level, being able to metabolize energy and to remove waste. That’s why amino acids really are key to so many functions of our body, when we’re trying to maintain health, recovery from exertion or stress or just stay young. We want to stay as young as we can for as long as we can and as healthy as we can. We want our horses to do the same. We want them to feel useful and be able to perform at their peak, and have a fulfilling full life just like we do. Those types of things are aided by the presence of the right amino acids

John Dowdy:                 As you just mentioned, amino acids are the building blocks of protein. Some of the questions that we have that come in, “Hey I’m already feeding a high protein diet. Why do I need this particular amino acids in Equinety?” What would you have to say about that? Proteins versus amino acids.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Going back to the physiology of how we utilize and metabolize a protein diet, is quite a bit different from the way that the supplement of Equinety’s amino acids are actually formulated. It has to do with digestion and the metabolic process. Eating a protein is a slow metabolic process. When you eat a protein, it goes into your gut, it starts to break down. It starts to become available for the nutrients to be absorbed. But it takes time to break down. A protein is something very complex to break down. When you’re eating protein, be it plant protein in the horse’s case, it will begin digestion in the stomach. But it really starts the digestion process to become bio available to enter the bloodstream more in the intestine.

By the time it goes through all the loops of intestine, both in humans and horses, it is about to the end of the small intestine before the digestion has occurred to the point of going into the larger bowels, and at that point becoming more compact and ready to eliminate. When you’re talking about Equinety, the eight amino acids that were specifically selected, that trigger or ignite the process that we are seeking to benefit for the horses, that occurs in the stomach, and becomes bio available right away into the bloodstream. Because the molecule itself is crystal and is very small. It allows that absorption to happen very quickly, and get into the bloodstream and make its way up to the brain, where it engages in the pituitary gland. I think, John, maybe we’ll talk about the pituitary gland in a minute because that’s a very important thing.

When you’re feeding your horse proteins, that’s great because they will get the benefit of those proteins breaking down, and getting eventually into the bloodstream. But this is a fast track on particular targeted stack of amino acids, that have a particular function that has been designed to give us the outcomes the effect on the pituitary and thus the effects in the body that we want for recovery, and for muscle development and for easing stress on nerves. Those types of things that John has described. That’s why it’s great to have a high protein diet, but it is also very beneficial to have the supplement due to where the absorption takes place.

John Dowdy:                 With the combination of the crystallized amino acids and the Equinety, you’re getting super-fast absorption so it can go right to work. Versus the protein, it just takes a lot of time. Not having a medical background myself, with protein, I’m sure some of that’s going to pass through the body because it’s maybe not going to break all of it down.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         That depends on the animal or the human system itself; how well they are able to metabolize protein. Protein is essential in your diet, and I’m not saying that Equinety would replace a protein diet in any way. If your vet has recommended that a high protein diet would be effective, and be useful for this particular horse’s condition, then that’s fabulous and something you really need to follow. It is not contradictory to taking Equinety, because in the bioavailability, you’re not going to be competing. There is a benefit to both that are not in conflict.

John Dowdy:                 I’ll go ahead and ask you this question. I had this one saved, but since we kind of brought that up, is there any going to have any negative side effects with any other medications or supplements or feeds or anything by giving Equinety?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         First of all, let’s talk about just the effects of amino acids themselves. The side effects of amino acids are almost none. I say almost because where you would risk having side effect with amino acids, is in overdosing. Providing a load that your body cannot manage effectively in its elimination processes. Like we’re saying, the dietary protein will not be in conflict with the Equinety dosing because they metabolize in a different way, and actually in a different area of the gut and hit the bloodstream at much different times. That’s not the concern.

The concern would be more if you were overdosing to the point that the body’s mechanisms couldn’t regulate it. Then if there is a risk of some fatigue or loss of coordination. I would be completely shocked if anyone would ever get to the point of an overdose with Equinety that would have any effect at all, because no one is going to give their horse that high of a dosage, and it’s not in conflict with the protein that they’re eating. Did that answer the question, John? I’m not exactly sure if I fully answered what you were thinking.

John Dowdy:                 No, that’s perfectly fine, because I guess if somebody had left the tub or dumped the entire tub in the bucket, that could be an overdose or?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         How your body tries to regulate the type of amino acid presence that Equinety would be, is when we were talking about going into the bloodstream, and when it then hits the pituitary. There is a signal when the pituitary signals the hippocampus to release the hormones, the GH, growth hormone particularly, but a number of other hormones that are incredibly important to cellular balance. There will be a shut off when the amount is adequate in the body. The body has that type of regulators. If you’re so overdosed that it’s leaking if you will.

If it’s too much for that shut off mechanism to hold, you could experience such a thing. But I would see that effect because of the way that proteins are metabolized, they’re going to be gone in 23 or 24 hours. If you see an overdose situation go through a full day, then you’ll know it’s pretty much out of their system because that’s the half-life, that’s the scientific word for how quickly we rid any substance from our body in a natural way. That’s 24 four hours would be the only time you should be worrying. You won’t need to worry about it a week later, or even a couple of days later, it will be pretty much gone by that time.

John Dowdy:                 Right. With the serving size of Equinety which is 5.2 grams, not quite a tablespoon, Dr. White was able to figure out that that is the optimal dosage to stimulate the pituitary ultimately. When you’re talking specifically about overdosing, we have a lot of performance horses that use this product. They swear by two scoops a day. That’s one in the morning, one in the evening. We’ve also found that injured horses or ones that are coming out of a surgery doing two scoops, one in the AM and one in the PM, they seem to really help the recovery process. That wouldn’t technically be overdosing. Overdosing would be like giving three, four, five scoops at a time or. Just to clarify that, what’s your take on that?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         I think that’s an incredibly important point about you being in touch and in tune with your horses. With that, you want to give the nutrients and the support that could be needed in the time, depending on how the performance of the horse, the demands that are on the horse. Two scoops particularly split dosing, doing a morning and a night dose, putting a recovery time for the body’s mechanisms to work, is ideal. You’re making enough amino acids of the proper type, available to the system, and you’re in tune enough to notice is this having the positive effect? I think what you’re saying is from the testimonials you’re receiving, that under conditions of extreme performance or stress or health or weather or whatever it may be affecting, that if we are in tune and we’re paying attention, we’re making the proper nutrients, enough amino acids available, and we’re knowing that that’s having a positive effect, and no more is needed and no negative effect is occurring.

I think that’s one of the beautiful things about the relationship we have in the horse-human partnership. That connection we have, that we can’t speak in words to our horses, but that we can be in tune with their health, with their needs. We can see from their coat, from their eyes, from the way they move, from the quality of their hooves, their hair. You can tell if you’re optimally caring for them and giving what they need under the conditions that are demanded of them. I think that’s really a lovely heartfelt thing that people are finding that they are able to optimally dose, and what works best to keep their horse fit and performing and happy and well. I love to hear stories like that, because it does take that type of connection to fine tune health like that. That fine balance of what really works for the specific situation you’re in.

John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. As we get a little further into this podcast, I’d love to go more in depth with that about your rehabilitation farm, and how you use horses to help with trauma victims. How it actually helps both the horse and the people. That’ll be a neat part of the conversation.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         I’d love to talk about that. Thank you for including it.

John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. One of the questions that we have that come in is, “Hey, my horse is dealing with this particular issue,” whatever it might be. It could be they need a topline filled in, or they’ve got some allergies. Or their hooves are absolutely horrible, or they’ve got laminitis or white liner or thrush, or navicular ringbone, or some gut issues, or they’re stressed. With all of these different things going on, and I know with the things that you’ve talked about so far, how can one little tiny scoop, 5.2 grams, given that daily, how can it have such a tremendous impact on all of these different scenarios with the horse?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         That is like the simplest question of science to answer, because the most basic laws of physics and physiology is elements seek perfect balance. They seek equilibrium. When you think about at what level could we affect all of those things you mentioned, you do have to go down to the molecular unit. How that molecular balance in the cell is in equilibrium. The way to do that is three things. The first one is getting elements into the cell that can have the mechanism of action to produce the energy, to provide really the fuel for the body to run optimally. Amino acids have a huge role in that. They work in the mitochondria to help metabolize the glucose coming in, and balancing that. Then the byproducts taking them out of the cell. We didn’t talk much about glucose, but that is a very important role of amino acids.

As well as regular regulating the human growth hormone, it, I should say growth hormone not human. It also helps to regulate glucose and keep that sugar level low, which minimizes inflammation. Inflammation causes the aging of cells. If you are keeping a cell highly functioning, producing a high level of energy, removing the toxins, keeping the blood sugar level circulating in the blood. That’s important because we do feed horses unless they’re out grazing all day. They eat once in the morning, maybe once midday, and once at night. In that, keeping their blood sugar level is really important. I hope that this makes sense, that if you’re really wanting to find tune health, minimize inflammation. The antioxidant property of amino acids can really help keep cells in their youth or their peak performance across the board.

That’s why it’s simple, that the body wants to work with you and fine tuning that helps. If you think about building. If you were a sculptor and you were going to make a sculpture out of a big piece of stone, you could not necessarily, Rodin could not create The Thinker totally with the jackhammer. He could take off the big pieces of stone with a jackhammer, but what needed to be fine-tuned to make that beautiful piece of art, is small balancing a very small instrument that takes the fine tunes, the beauty of the art. That’s what we’re doing, is with the amino acids, our hope is to fine-tune health at the smallest level, which impacts all aspects of health. It influences the aspect of health if you’re old, if you’re young, if you’re big, if you’re small. That’s why I think it’s so important that Equinety can be used through the life cycle of a horse, because balance is important every day of the horse’s life.

John Dowdy:                 Now with the example that you just gave, so the jackhammer, or in this case we could say giving the horse a scoop of Equinety could be equivalent to the jackhammer in this example. Because then ultimately we’ve got to fine tune from a molecular level. We’re stimulating the pituitary gland or the amino acids are rapidly absorbed through the bloodstream, stimulate the pituitary. Let’s get into a little bit and we kind of did this, so a little backwards. Let’s talk about the role and the function of the pituitary gland. What these amino acids, when we give it to the horse, now it stimulates the pituitary and then what happens now?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Okay. The pituitary gland is sometimes called the Master Gland. It’s the perfect name for such a teeny tiny thing. The pituitary is about the size of a pea, and it sits at the base of your brain behind the sinuses, about the level of the bridge of your nose. When the amino acids have passed through the blood brain barrier, which Equinety has been formulated to be small enough to make such an entry. Then it ignites or gives a communication to the hippocampus that releases particular hormones that then start traveling throughout the body to do their jobs. To signal releases of certain other elements in body function.

The pituitary really is the one that has an effect on most all body functions. That’s when we’re stimulating the proper and healthful release of HG and other hormones that promote health. Then that’s the way that from a very central control booth, or a central master mind, the master gland, then that signal can be taken by a whole army of different mechanisms throughout the body to maintain health. It’s also in certain timeframes that that first, the first release of hormone then also gets replaced and triggers other releases. It’s a cascading effect that can last throughout the day.

John Dowdy:                 Being able to get to the pituitary as the fine tuning at the molecular level. Now what Dr. White was able to figure out back in 1998 by triggering this on the human side, and when we came into the horse industry and you kind of made mention of this, but the pituitary about the size of a pea and that’s pretty close in mammals across the board?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         It is ironically. Isn’t that interesting because it’s one of all those glands too that doesn’t grow a lot of size from when you’re a baby till you’re an adult. That’s an interesting thing about the pituitary. It does say name to its importance. In the evolution of people and all animals really, those crucial centers if you will in the body are pretty well developed when you take your first breath or begin functioning in the outside world outside of the room. That’s something that I think is really amazing that any horse of any size or age or breed, the basic dose of one scoop in relationship to the size of the pituitary, is a good place to start. We talked about that you might increase to two scoops for performance or under stressful conditions. But with the one scoop it’s the right dosing in relationship to the size of the pituitary.

John Dowdy:                 That is very interesting. One of the other questions that we get often are, “There’s something going on with my horse. Do I just need to keep the Equinety product on my horse to fix the issue? Then can I stop or should I keep it on the product long term? Is there any long-term pros and cons with keeping them on product?”

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         There is definitely a long-term pro. You’re wanting to keep your horse on a cellular molecular balance, and even highly functioning level their entire lifetime. I think you’re saying like during the off season if you will, when horses are… I was a polo player for years and years. In my case, I didn’t tether my horses to the desert and play all winter. My polo horses really pretty much had the winter off, but their health was critically important to me for two reasons. That you can’t expect a animal or a human to go out in peak performance after they’ve taken a break, or after they’ve had an illness or been off the field for a while. If they haven’t regained their fitness. Wouldn’t it be easier to keep the athlete or keep the horse or keep the human fit, keep them nutritionally fit, as well as keeping their movement and keeping their body, rather than to have to try to recover it later?

Or wouldn’t it be better to help keep a horse or a human healthy in a preventative health type of way, that keep their immune system strong, keep their muscles strong. Being able to keep them healthy for the long-term rather than to have to try to improve health when it gets out of balance. I know for me with 10 horses, the vet bills could be astronomical if I didn’t have healthy, well-balanced horses. It’s important to me that they are balanced, and that they are healthy, and that they do have a common baseline. I know me personally, my vet bills have dramatically reduced, and the general health of my horses, a colic on my farm would be a rare thing.

It really doesn’t happen much anymore. Extreme changes in temperature sometimes happen in California. Right now we’re experiencing a difference of 40 degrees from night to day. Those types of swings in temperature really have an impact on the balance of the horses, and the risk for colic. I am adamant that they get their Equinety every single day. Every single horse. If it’s the minis or the drafts, the big nearly 2000 pound horses. It’s important to all of them to have that balance. In the long run, I think I save a lot of money, and it just makes us all happy to see healthy, strong horses.

John Dowdy:                 I think that’s very common. People are definitely saving a significant amount of money since they started using the product, the Equinety product. Their horses are healthier, happier. That’s great. We’ve also found just to touch on what you were talking about keeping your horses on 365, especially a lot of people up North that kind of hang their horses up for the winter. We found that those that keep their horses on product, they’re back in shape in two, three, sometimes four weeks ahead of schedule, from years past when they didn’t have the Equinety, or didn’t know it was available. They’re back in shape a lot faster. Their hooves look great. They help hold their weight. It all makes sense to what you’re saying for sure.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         I really want to emphasize, I’m basing what I’m saying. I’m not a veterinarian. I’m not an animal research expert. All of my research in my entire career has been in human health. First and foremost, always follow your veterinary advisement. If the veterinarian, your reclaimed horse specialists that you trust and that you employ, has instructed you, that’s the first directive to follow. They have much more history of the horse. They have the background, they have lab tests, they have physical examination to backup what they’re saying.

First and foremost, follow your veterinary advisement. But I have lived with and cared for horses my entire life, and they’re so deeply important to me. I look at their health from the scientific perspective, because in some ways, physiology is physiology. The way that horses function in this particular manner, in the pituitary manner, is very similar to humans. That’s why it just makes sense to me from a scientific perspective that the science I’ve known all my career, applying it to this particular situation is legitimate. It makes sense.

John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. I’ll tell you it’s been fun for me over the last, well since we’ve been on the market and we’ve been out at different events. In the beginning there were a lot of questions because we were new to the market. I would always know there was something up when somebody would go more in depth with the questioning. I’m like, “Okay, this isn’t your average person just asking questions.” Then after I answered all the questions, the best way I knew from a scientific level, then they would tell me, “Oh, I’m a vet.”

I go, “Oh,” of course, I passed all their questioning tests so that was good. But as you say, this goes back to this simplistic thing of science, and what the amino acids are doing in the body at a cellular level, whether it be on the people side or the horse side. I mean primarily it all works the same once you get in there from a pituitary standpoint

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Just science has been defined in the literature since the 1920s. Amino acid effect on pituitary is not new science. It’s almost been 100 years that it’s been documented in the scientific literature. I think that the basis of how the mechanisms work is quite standard. I believe that it’s brilliant how Dr. White isolated, which of the eight amino acids, the eight amino acids that he did select to go in Equinety. Their qualities and their characteristics. How they affect the pituitary, and which hormones do they stimulate for what purposes? That type of science really has a brilliance that I am impressed with, and that I fully agree with. The theories that the product was based on I think was very, very well thought, and based in a lot of acceptable science. That’s why I’m an endorser, I believe that I can put my reputation on it as well.

John Dowdy:                 I tell you what Dr. Charlyn, this is really valuable information. I can’t thank you enough for sharing from a scientific standpoint. I know it’s going to be very, very helpful for a lot of those that are tuning in for the first time and learning really the importance of amino acids and what it has for their horse. We’re seeing it on a day to day basis, but it’s being exposed to new people all the time. I think this is going to be a very, very valuable podcast for the information. Thank you so much for your scientific expertise.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Are you getting what you hoped? Are you getting pieces that you wanted?

John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. I’m sure down the road we can do a follow up. Thank you so much for all of that. As I mentioned in your intro, I also had mentioned that in your spare time, you also have an equine therapy. The name of your farm is Belos Cavalos. Tell us what that means, and tell us all about your equine therapy and your farm there?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Great. Thank you so much for asking because this truly is my heart’s work. In global health, I work in malaria and other tropical diseases all over the world. When I was working with refugees with the United Nations, we were taught a particular model of trauma recovery, which is an experiential model. It’s when tragedy and trauma are so bad that there are not words to discuss or explain what has been experienced. Oftentimes, language barriers are an issue. Being able to address trauma from the inside out, through experiences, through nature, through physical activity, through foods, through music, through dance, through drumming. Those types of things are a way to resolve trauma. When I did leave the UN refugee work and came back to California, I was asked to do that type of trauma recovery work at my farm.

The natural thing to do was to incorporate the horses into the work, because the horses become the most amazing facilitators. Their sensitivity is so keen, that horses by nature, are designed as prey animals. That’s meaning their senses are so much more heightened than ours. Their life depends on being able to use sight, sound, smell, touch, taste to keep alive and to thrive. In that way, it makes them incredible nonverbal communicators, and heart to heart connectors. Right away, I found with those who had survived severe trauma, were particularly open and available to nature and to the horses, animals in general. Just experiencing something without having to talk about it. Thus, we created a curriculum that included resilience, self-regulation, empathy and elements of hope.

Through particular activities and engagements that people who have survived trauma, particularly children, could really accelerate their recovery, and begin to open up and work through their trauma through an experiential way. The horse is so engaged with particularly the children, that we only really needed to hold as a safe space for these types of engagements to occur. That the horses really have the ability to take these people through a lot of their trauma awareness, and to get in touch with it and get back into their bodies and to be able to start to breathe again with some ease. We do breathing with the horses. We do yoga with the horses. A lot of walking and hiking. Things like grooming, for people to be able to touch and feel the softness of a horse’s nose, and the roughness of their hooves.

Those types of things help them get grounded again, and get familiar with their selves again. It’s a very powerful tool. The farm is called Terra De Belos Cavalos, which means Land of Beautiful Horses. My charity is called Belos Cavalos meaning Beautiful Horses. Just because the herd and the horses themselves create that type of metaphor for what we’re trying to do. That the horse-human herd, when you can engage together, is a very healing opportunity when protected. I would very much love to share at a greater length the philosophy of the horse-human connection, and its impact on trauma recovery. It’s something that has really become my heart’s work.

In fact, this coming week I’m going to be training in mind body medicine, and being able to introduce our equine work into a group of physicians from across the country that are all going to be gathering together to study on how to integrate mind-body medicine more into our practice of human healthcare. I’m thrilled to be able to bring the history and the theory of the horse and the herd dynamic to that work. I think that it’s not just a trend or it’s not just a fad that’s coming in and out. I think that it is a way for humans at large to become more engaged. In this world of so much technology and connectivity, to get down to earth again, and to be able to take the aspects and the characteristics of a horse and apply them to our own wellness might be something that goes far beyond just the programs I do in trauma recovery here at my farm.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Now, maybe for some of those who aren’t familiar with how this type of thing works, therapy horses and how beneficial that is. Could you give an example? Maybe somebody that has never been around a horse and they might just be terrified of horses. What’s been their experience when they come out to the farm, and how do you connect or how does the horse connect with somebody that might be fearful because they’ve just never been around a horse before? What’s that experience like?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         That describes almost everyone that has survived a severe trauma. I say it’s very few of them that have ever been around a horse or touched a horse. That in itself is a huge gain for someone to feel the confidence to engage and relate to a very, very large animal that they’ve never had contact with. It starts rather slowly, and it starts … we do most of the work that we do at liberty. Meaning that you don’t have a halter or line, and it’s all in relationship. I need to bring Equinety back into the conversation, because I have to say the horses that participate in this work, they have to be healthy and confident to engage in the work, so that they can be at their best. That’s one thing, that’s why Equinety has been so important to me. It’s when horses are at their best, they’re able to engage in this work well.

The one example that I would love to tell you, we work with a great number of youth that are either incarcerated, or they’ve been removed from their living situation by law enforcement or the court. They live in an institution or a group setting. Those children, because of the trauma they’ve been through, they sometimes disassociate, and they’re not fully in their body. What they’ve experienced numbs them, and they are not feeling all of their senses. We have walking with a horse one day, a young man who was extra sensitive to any sound or sudden movement, his fear alarm was set on high volume. He was really jumpy. He’s walking along with one of our mares, [Shalena 00:51:06] who has had numerous falls, and she’s just a gentle, gentle soul. Something banged across the farm, maybe the tractor dropped something or something happened, and she slightly startled.

This boy nearly jumped out of his skin. He looked at me in complete terror, and I said, “What just happened?” He said, “I heard a noise and Shalena jumped.” I said, “Then what happened?” He told me the story of what happened and then I said, “What was happening in you?” He said, “My hands got all sweaty and my heart beat faster, and I thought I was going to cry.” I said, “What did Shalena do?” He goes, “Well Shalena kind of jumped but then she just thought, “Oh, it’s just the tractor. It’s no big deal,” and she just stood by me.” Then I said, “Why don’t we stand,” I said, “Does Shalena seem calm to you?” He said, “Yes, Shalena is calm.” I said, “Then put your hand on Shalena’s side, and let’s just breathe with Shalena. Feel her breath. Feel her hair, feel her  warmth, feel her breathe.”

“Let’s match her breathing until you feel calm.” He did and until he was done, as long as it took. When he was done he says, “I feel calm.” I said, “Well, let’s walk on.” We dropped it, and then that’s all the processing that was needed. He was able to recognize his fear, assess it, what’s going on around him. He was able to look inside, what effect did that have on me? What’s happening to my heart? Am I sweating? How am I breathing? He was able to reach out for something of stability. Shalena was the stable thing. He was able to physically connect with her, put his hand on her fur, feel her warmth, feel her breathe. Then in a breathing self-regulation, because her breathing was slow and relaxed, he matched that slow and relaxed breathing, and he was able to regulate himself and feel in relationship.

John Dowdy:                 Wow, and all without medications.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Yes, and then we let it be. We didn’t over-talk it. We didn’t sit down on a couch and analyze it. We just let that experience be. But later on I heard when he got back to the children’s center, he told one of the staff what happened and he said, he told the story, and then he said, “And I love Shalena.” I thought so he was able to express love. Sometimes it’s hard for these kids to receive love and express it, because it can be dangerous. It allowed him to actually express love knowing that rejection wouldn’t follow that. It was really a powerful experience. Yes, no medicine, it wasn’t a long session. It wasn’t long, and it was just part of the activity.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Now, do you have any experience with military, dealing with PTSD? Not that it can’t be in children as well, PTSD, but as far as military goes.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Here at my farm we have not, but I would love to. There are two groups. One are our military veterans, and the second are first responders, the EMTs, ambulance drivers, firemen, policemen. We have done workshops and facilitated sessions with first responders. We even have a program called LEO, Law Enforcement Officers. That whole area of PTSD is very, very important to us. Our capacity has not developed those programs as deeply as we’d like to, because we got targeted by the County where we live to be the center that is the clinical program for the youth particularly, in the situation that I described.

But my heart’s desire is to be able to expand to both those adult groups. Because it’s very impactful for people at any age to be able to heal from the inside out. That’s what the experiential work, the work with nature, the work with horses. The work of incorporating all of those elements, movement and animals and food and music, to be able to do that in one setting. It takes very little talk. I’m talking a lot so you think maybe that’s not the case, but it needs actual recovery sessions. It’s very, very little talk. We don’t need to.

John Dowdy:                 Now if we go back, I believe a year or two ago, there were fires that were bearing down on your facility, and it seemed like you had a dome of protection. But if memory serves me correctly didn’t you host a lot of the firefighters and they had to set up at your facility?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         That’s exactly right. We’re in the center of the wine country of Northern California. All around me are vineyards. I am the one property that doesn’t have acres and acres and acres of grapes. We do have olive trees and we do produce olive oil for the charity as one of the ways that we raise money, but we have a lot of open space. I also have a private FAA certified airport on the property. In this case, we were actually the nuns fire if you saw any news that identified different fires, we were nuns fire. It actually began right behind our property in State Park. We have 22,000 acres of a public park that run up the mountain side behind me. Since we have so much open space, Cal Fire set up their base camp here. They used the airport, they can stage their large bulldozing equipment, where many of the neighbors all around me burned.

My property was somewhat damaged but not destroyed by any means. All my buildings in some form, stayed intact. The first responders actually had base camp here, 37 port-a-potties if you can imagine. They did protect us and I thanked them one day for keeping my property protected and safe. They said, “Would you let your own home burn if you could help it?” They were actually stationed here. They were quite happy to be here. We’ve had them come after the fire, and we had a gathering and they brought the fire trucks, and we spent time together.

That’s what really hit me, how important this issue of post-traumatic shock really is. If we get really serious about it, there’s not a person on the planet that hasn’t experienced forms of trauma, and loss and pain or abuse, or losing someone that they deeply love, and feeling that trauma gap. I think that this is something that we as those who own and love horses, we understand how powerful that nature and that connection to animals and particularly horses can be. It’s something that we can share in a very simple way that has maybe a far greater reach than we might imagine.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, absolutely. What have you experienced with, because we’re talking about the animals helping people, have you seen the opposite happen? Where the horses have actually changed in a way? Because some of them may come from trauma situations themselves.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Probably about half of our horses are severe trauma survivors themselves. One of my horses I flew him from Brazil, he was a bullfighter and he was injured. This particular horse is I would say that he probably had PTSD when he came to America. He was so sensitive that a feather would blow by, and he’d shoot up like a rocket. He began working in the trauma recovery work probably about six years ago. He has become so engaged with people and so interested in relationship. He still has the sensitivities, he still has the energy. He’s still [Secreto 01:01:53], he’s still very much the head of the herd. But his tenderness and his gentleness … he can run an obstacle course and jump jumps and weave cones with a child at liberty, because he chooses to be in relationship. It’s so beautiful as we brought a [Marion 01:02:14] that had suffered one stillborn and then one miscarriage three months before delivery.

She was probably in the eighth month when she lost the last foal. They brought her here, and I have seen her she was quite shut down and not really interested in people. Now, I drive up, and she trots over to the edge of her paddock to the fence and greets me. It sees a way that he engages she’ll walk from her paddock into the stable, into her stall at liberty. Now she just walks side by side. They have come into enjoying that type of engagement. I truly feel that humans and horses are learning and growing and healing together. It’s trust. It’s feeling safe. It’s having a job to do that they enjoy. I had a 38 year old horse that was on Equinety every single day that I had him, who just passed away.

He was a national champion polo player. He just passed away in July at age 38. His name is Bearcat. He worked with the children in the charity the day before. He was completely engaged, and loving, and participated. Then the next day he was not looking quite right. I called the vet and he said, “Bearcat’s ready to go. He’s done.” It was so amazing because someone that knew him from the polo circuit came to visit within the last year of Bearcat’s life. They said, “We have never seen Bearcat so happy, that the last five years have been the best years of his life, being engaged in the charity work. He so loves his job.” I feel like keeping his health in balance, and keeping his mind active and sharp, allowed him to enjoy all the days of his 38 years until the end.

John Dowdy:                 That’s incredible.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Just like humans. If our health is good, and we’ve got relationships and we’ve got something to do that has purpose and meaning, then what more could we ask for? That’s a fulfilling rich life.

John Dowdy:                 That’s right. Well, Dr. Charlyn, I can’t thank you enough for your time. This is probably, well it is our longest podcast we’ve had. It’s pack full of information, and thank you so much for your expertise from a scientific level, and for sharing about your farm and your rehabilitation work. That’s absolutely fascinating. If somebody wanted to look you up online where would be the best place to find you?

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Our website is BelosCavalos.org. B-E-L-O-S C-A-V-A-L-O-S.org. The same on Instagram. You can get a beautiful look at what our farm is, and what we do and how we engage from our Instagram. We are also on Facebook, BelosCavalos.org. I would want to say a lot of, well all of the children that we work with are at a high level of security. Just so that you know, the children that you see on the website are other children that have come and done activities and engaged with the horses in similar things that the charity kids do. But it is unlawful for us to post any image. Some of these children have experienced sex trafficking and abduction and some things. Just so that you know we’re not at not exposing the children that are actually under security that are in the charity on the websites. Those children are doing the same engagements with the horses, but we have permission from their parents.

John Dowdy:                 Right. Some of the work that you’re doing, high profile people that probably may or may not have been on the news, things like this that all of their…

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         That’s right. Or that they’re at risk because they have escaped a terrible situation, and their whereabouts need to be protected.

John Dowdy:                 I can’t thank you enough for doing that kind of work. I know I’ve been out to your place. It’s a beautiful place, and didn’t get to spend enough time with my travels, but I’ve got to come back out there and visit some time.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         You’re always welcome.

John Dowdy:                 Thank you.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         I hope you do.

John Dowdy:                 I will definitely do that.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         I want to thank everyone that listened. I’m incredibly grateful that you took the time to hear my stories of the charity, and also to learn more about Equinety because John and the Equinety product are very, very important to me. I appreciate you generously giving your time to listen and hope that it was useful to you.

John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. Well, Dr. Charlyn from California, thank you so much for taking the time to be on the Equinety podcast.

Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Thank you. Bye-bye.

John Dowdy:                 Bye-bye.

 

 

 

 

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  Dr Charlyn Belluzo - The Science of Amino Acids – How they work at a cellular level – The Benefits of Long Term - Belos Cavalos Therapy Farm   - John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast.  <br /> <br /> <br /> Dr Charlyn Belluzo - The Science of Amino Acids – How they work at a cellular level –<br /> The Benefits of Long Term - Belos Cavalos Therapy Farm<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. I am so excited for this podcast this week. We've been trying to coordinate this for quite a few months now. Before we jump into it, if this is your first time listening in on our podcast, and maybe this is the first time you've heard about the Equinety Product, I'm going to give you a quick background on what it is and then we'll get into our guest today. This product actually started back in 1998 as a anti-aging youth formula for the 50+ crowd. Dr. Philip White, who's British, Cambridge and Harvard educated family physician, and head of the hospital for 35+ years in Canada, was able to figure out the combination of amino acids to stimulate the pituitary gland. Which then releases the necessary hormones, which help heal the body at a cellular level. That was 1998.<br /> <br /> We skipped forward to 2014, and we put the same formula in a tub and called it Equinety, so we could market it to the horse industry. If you're looking around on Facebook and hearing people talk about it, it's quite an amazing product. We are definitely blessed. The reason I'm so excited today is our guest today, Dr. Charlyn Belluzo out of California. I'm going to give you an intro here. Grab a cup of coffee because it's a long intro, but that's okay because this is so exciting. All right, here we go. Dr. Charlyn, internationally recognized as a global health expert in both business and nonprofit sectors. She has expertise in population wellness, medical research, regulatory affairs, strategic planning, marketing and operational management, just to name a few. Her professional passion has been to promote human health and wellness, strengthen communities, generate economic prosperity, and enrich the lives of the world's most vulnerable.<br /> <br /> She holds doctorate degrees of public health in tropical medicine and preventative health. Holds a masters degree of business administration and completed postgraduate training and a medical fellowship in HIV/AIDS research, managing international clinical trials and authoring new drug applications for regulatory drug approval. To fill in the extra time in her life, and one of the main reasons why we have her on the call today, is because she has an equine therapy nonprofit that does amazing work with among other things, trauma victims. When she first learned about the Equinety product around 2015 timeframe and saw the amino acids, she knew exactly what Dr. White was doing with this, and how it was going to help the body. Without further ado, Dr. Charlyn Belluzo, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Dr Charlyn Belluzo         I am delighted to be here. Thank you so much for the invitation.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Well, we are happy to have you. I know there's been a lot of questions come in, and so we're just going to pick your brain if that's okay with you.<br /> <br /> Dr Charlyn Belluzo         Fabulous. Let's get started.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 We're talking about amino acids and we're going to get into a bit of the science. There seems to be a lot of education that I guess would need to happen with a lot of people out there. They're just not familiar with amino acids. I thought this would be a great way to help them get educated. We've got a lot of educational things on our website, but there's no better substitute than to have somebody that really understands from a medical standpoint. Although your background is been more on the human side, I think as we get through this, people understand how it can translate right over into the horse world. One of the things that we were talking about, what's your take on the physiology standpoint, John Dowdy clean 1:09:13
034 – Lori Ganacha – Severe Laminitis – Thin Soles – Now happier and trimming every 3 weeks https://www.teamequinety.com/034-lori-ganacha-severe-laminitis-thin-soles-now-happier-and-trimming-every-3-weeks/ Wed, 23 Oct 2019 13:00:40 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1771   Lori Ganacha - Severe Laminitis - Thin Soles - Now happier and trimming every 3 weeks   John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. This week we're swinging out to Berthoud, Colorado, and talking with Lori Ganacha. She's got an eight year old mustang that came down with some laminitis and was her first time dealing with something like this. I'm excited to share this one with you because we've been getting a lot of phone calls and emails with horses with hoof issues and thin soles and all this type of stuff, and this is going to be the perfect, at least in my opinion, perfect podcast to touch upon these things and what this mustang has gone through. So without further ado, Lori, welcome to The Equinety podcast. Lori Ganacha:                Thank you, John. It's good to be here. I'm excited to share my story. John Dowdy:                 That's great. Well, we're excited to have you. I believe it was back in June of this year, right around the 13th, so it's been about four months ago, you had reached out to us and I believe you and I spoke directly. You were telling me some things that were going on with your mustang. Why don't we just step back in time a little bit and share with everybody what you were going through at that time? Lori Ganacha:                Okay, John. Well, I've got an eight year old mustang, as you said, and last May, approximately five, six months ago, he had, we had, I had what I would consider the perfect storm for a laminitic episode with my mustang, who has never had that problem before. I'll tell you what the perfect storm was. It was the beginning of spring. There was green grass coming up. They were out on pasture. I was limiting their pasture time. I've got two other horses as well, but spring grassing I've always been aware of, so it's not a full blown thing. I try to acclimate them to it. So they were on spring grass. He got his hoofs trimmed because he's a barefoot horse, and, without speaking unkindly about the farrier who did it, it was very, very, very short trim. To the point where he was lame on all four feet right after the trim. So that was the second part of this perfect storm. The third part was we got a horrific spring storm two days later that was a combination of snow and rain and cold and nasty, windy ick. So that was the third part, and the fourth part of this perfect storm, I think, was the spring hormonal levels in this mustang. He came out of that storm because there wasn't a lot we could do during it. I got the vet out here, and he was doing okay in the mud because he had a little bit of insulation and a little bit of cold on his feet, but we took x-rays of this lame horse and he had rotated slightly in his coffin bone. As I said, his feet were just ridiculously short trimmed and my vet basically said in a nutshell, "The next two weeks is going to be critical for him. I can't give you a great outlook on this, but I'm not going to say it couldn't be, but I'm not going to do that for you." So we also tested him for insulin resistance, which he was, and he was put on a pretty strenuous diet. She told me he's by no means obese but he needs to drop about 40-50 pounds just to take some pressure off of his feet. So that was where we sat there. I was going through this two week period, trying to keep him as comfortable as possible. I did get him in some soft ride boots, but he was pretty sore dude, let me tell you. He ended up going in his stall for the most part. Because he was so sore, we didn't want him to do anything silly if he had the opportunity to do it, like think he feels good and go run and buck or anything. Plus he had the soft ride boots on, which was keeping him a little bit less mobile. So the outcome was not looking completely rosy. I, John, have never dealt with laminitis in a horse before, not my own. So as we say, you learn a lot about the things you have the problems with and so I was doing all sorts of ...

 

Lori Ganacha – Severe Laminitis – Thin Soles –
Now happier and trimming every 3 weeks

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. This week we’re swinging out to Berthoud, Colorado, and talking with Lori Ganacha. She’s got an eight year old mustang that came down with some laminitis and was her first time dealing with something like this. I’m excited to share this one with you because we’ve been getting a lot of phone calls and emails with horses with hoof issues and thin soles and all this type of stuff, and this is going to be the perfect, at least in my opinion, perfect podcast to touch upon these things and what this mustang has gone through. So without further ado, Lori, welcome to The Equinety podcast.

Lori Ganacha:                Thank you, John. It’s good to be here. I’m excited to share my story.

John Dowdy:                 That’s great. Well, we’re excited to have you. I believe it was back in June of this year, right around the 13th, so it’s been about four months ago, you had reached out to us and I believe you and I spoke directly. You were telling me some things that were going on with your mustang. Why don’t we just step back in time a little bit and share with everybody what you were going through at that time?

Lori Ganacha:                Okay, John. Well, I’ve got an eight year old mustang, as you said, and last May, approximately five, six months ago, he had, we had, I had what I would consider the perfect storm for a laminitic episode with my mustang, who has never had that problem before. I’ll tell you what the perfect storm was. It was the beginning of spring. There was green grass coming up. They were out on pasture. I was limiting their pasture time. I’ve got two other horses as well, but spring grassing I’ve always been aware of, so it’s not a full blown thing. I try to acclimate them to it. So they were on spring grass. He got his hoofs trimmed because he’s a barefoot horse, and, without speaking unkindly about the farrier who did it, it was very, very, very short trim. To the point where he was lame on all four feet right after the trim. So that was the second part of this perfect storm.

The third part was we got a horrific spring storm two days later that was a combination of snow and rain and cold and nasty, windy ick. So that was the third part, and the fourth part of this perfect storm, I think, was the spring hormonal levels in this mustang. He came out of that storm because there wasn’t a lot we could do during it. I got the vet out here, and he was doing okay in the mud because he had a little bit of insulation and a little bit of cold on his feet, but we took x-rays of this lame horse and he had rotated slightly in his coffin bone.

As I said, his feet were just ridiculously short trimmed and my vet basically said in a nutshell, “The next two weeks is going to be critical for him. I can’t give you a great outlook on this, but I’m not going to say it couldn’t be, but I’m not going to do that for you.” So we also tested him for insulin resistance, which he was, and he was put on a pretty strenuous diet. She told me he’s by no means obese but he needs to drop about 40-50 pounds just to take some pressure off of his feet. So that was where we sat there. I was going through this two week period, trying to keep him as comfortable as possible. I did get him in some soft ride boots, but he was pretty sore dude, let me tell you. He ended up going in his stall for the most part. Because he was so sore, we didn’t want him to do anything silly if he had the opportunity to do it, like think he feels good and go run and buck or anything.

Plus he had the soft ride boots on, which was keeping him a little bit less mobile. So the outcome was not looking completely rosy. I, John, have never dealt with laminitis in a horse before, not my own. So as we say, you learn a lot about the things you have the problems with and so I was doing all sorts of research, but what I was doing was I was really praying about this and I got a lot of people on board to pray about this. I felt a certain amount of guilt that I think a lot of people feel when their horse goes through something like this. We always say maybe I would’ve, should’ve, could’ve done something different, but I started praying a lot about it.

Got a ton of people praying and in fact you, John, when I called you, you prayed, and so that takes us to the next two weeks. He was doing a little bit better. His feet didn’t look a bit different. They were still the short trim mess that they started out with. He was on a diet which was making him less than a hundred percent happy, and just a little side note, I did talk to another farrier, actually my vet’s husband, who didn’t give me the best outlook for this either. My vet also told me that there was a potential that he could have to be put into these wooden clogs, which I’ve never heard of those, but something that might help him to keep everything stable inside of his hoof, at some point in the game so that he could rejoin his other two friends and be part of the herd again.

He talked to me a lot about laminitis. As a farrier, he had a really somewhat grim outlook on the whole thing. He says it can just be ugly and messy and a downward spiral. He said, “But I guess there’s a little bit of hope,” and I just kept thinking, but there’s a lot of prayers and that’s what kept me going through this. But in the meantime, I was doing a lot of research and this and that. My vet did put him on a couple of products to help them out a little bit. But then a friend of mine from Montana called me out of the blue, and Rod and I were talking about this laminitic episode. For some reason, Rod just said, “Have you ever looked into Equinety?” I’m like, no, because I’ve never heard of it.

He said, “Well, I’ve never used it and I’ve never tried it, but you might want to look into this.” I just thought that was kind of ironic and probably a God orchestrated comment that came out of his mouth. We’d never really used it. So, but he’s also a horse chiropractor and a horse healer. He said, “You might want to look into this.” So of course I did. I called you John, within 10 minutes of getting off the phone with Rod and we talked about it. I told you what was going on and you so kindly said, “Get this horse on this product, I will overnight it to you and get him on it ASAP.” So I did, and he’s been on it ever since. He’s expecting his next load of it coming in the mail today.

John Dowdy:                 Right. So our phone call was on June 13th which, today the time of this recording is October. So that’s right at four months. So you received the product and how quickly did you begin to notice some changes?

Lori Ganacha:                It was kind of difficult at first because he’s in the soft ride boots, but I noticed a change in attitude. I just noticed something different, something that changed within probably a week to 10 days. Two weeks later, I did take off … I was taking off soft boots periodically, but I took them off and I got a really good look at his feet a couple of weeks later and I was like, “Oh my gosh, he’s growing some hoof.” The thing about that, John, is from all my research and from talking to people, et cetera, and I mean professionals, with a horse that has had a laminitic episode, hoof growth is ridiculously slow. Horribly slow, and that’s a very painful part of this whole process is waiting for your horse’s hoof to grow.

My vet did tell me, she said, “Your horse will grow a brand new hoof within a year just naturally.” But with the Equinety, I think he’s going to grow a brand new hoof way before a year. To go back a little way, so I was checking his hoof growth and within four weeks it was like, “Wow, I think he’s got a quarter, half an inch of growth.”

John Dowdy:                 Wow.

Lori Ganacha:                That was amazing. Remember the short trim?

John Dowdy:                 Oh yeah.

Lori Ganacha:                Yes. So within six or eight weeks, because we were limiting him and I was exercising him but not overdoing it, not giving him the opportunity to go nuts and taking off his boots, getting them out of those and everything else. I would say within six to seven weeks, he needed his feet trimmed. We were trying to get him out of those boots and get him on a whole different path with this whole thing. So, yeah, he needed his feet trimmed and he needed his feet trimmed because they were about a half an inch.

John Dowdy:                 That’s incredible.

Lori Ganacha:                That’s pretty amazing. That’s pretty amazing. So we did trim his feet and I will tell you he did get a little sore from that because he was used to having that growth, and then we took it off. We didn’t take too much off. He got a little sore. He got through that very, very well. We got him out of soft ride boots. He’s been out of them ever since. He gets his feet trimmed every three weeks. We’re no longer using nippers on him, we’re just rasping them every three weeks to keep them where we want them. I tell you John, every three weeks he needs this done. I’m not willing to wait longer because I don’t want to have to use the nippers because I don’t want that kind of a change real quick.

John Dowdy:                 So if we back up a little bit, so you’re dealing with an extreme case here. The vet’s not giving you a very good outcome. Not really wanting to say a whole lot, and then of course your farrier is giving you all of the bad possible outcomes that could come from laminitis. So here you are. So, you get a little prayer chain going and then throw in some Equinety and now we are with some crazy hoof growth, healthy hoofs. So has the vet or this farrier that you initially spoke with, that were giving you all the outcomes, have they seen the horse since or lately or since they been on Equinety?

Lori Ganacha:                Absolutely. Well first of all, my vet was just, she was being tactful and just not wanting to say he’ll be just fine because we did not know. She wasn’t really giving me a horrible outlook. She just said, “I couldn’t give you a perfectly positive outlook because I didn’t know.” She said, “I’ve seen cases exactly like his either go be great or completely fall apart.” So I appreciated her honesty with that. Absolutely. She’s been out here several times since then and in fact, she was out here a couple of weeks ago looking at one of my other horses and I just said, “You want to look at my mustang’s feet?” She’s like, “Absolutely.” She said, “They look amazing.” Amazing. The other thing that I thought was interesting is, at first with the x-ray she said, “You can see where some of the laminae has died” and this and that and everything else.

She said, “At some point pretty soon, we’re going to be, someone’s going to be rasping him and it’s going to start getting kind of grainy because of that dead laminae.” It’s never happened yet. In fact, my farrier was like, “Lori, I just don’t see anything that even looks like this horse has ever been laminitic.” But I do know some of the laminae died, but I think, I don’t know, by the power of God. I told God from the beginning, if you heal this mustang, I will give you all the glory. God’s got all the glory, but God also turned me on to the Equinety through my friend Rod, and I think the perfect storm of blessings was culminated as well as the perfect storm of how this happened.

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Lori Ganacha:                It’s called a great vet, a great farrier, Equinety, but number one, God and a lot of love involved in this whole thing.

John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. Well, I tell you, we are blessed. Our company is blessed for all the things that this product has done for horses from one extreme to the other and even getting into the performance horse, which doesn’t really have a lot of issues, it helps with recovery and stamina. What this product, for those of you tuning in for the first time, what this product is actually doing, first of all, it’s 100% pure amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. We all have to have them. But these are specifically formulated and put in this stack of eight amino acids to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body. That’s what releases the necessary hormones, which then help the body heal at a cellular level. So in this case, we’re dealing with laminitis, also insulin resistance, which by the way, how’s the IR doing?

Lori Ganacha:                John, we haven’t retested it. His whole diet has changed. So I’m giving it … We’ll probably have it retested in the next several months. I can tell it’s different because in the beginning, he had a pretty hard crusty neck. He always has. My vet is like, “His neck is so much softer and it’s actually going down.” I would hope that has something to do with the Equinety. I’m assuming it does, but also with insulin resistance, there’s got to be a pretty complete feed change, which he’s on a complete feed change. He’s no longer on a super strict diet, but he’s on a different diet.

John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah, and so when we’re talking about … These are completely different things going on, laminitis versus insulin resistance. Then you look at the Equinety. So from the Equinety aspect, the amino acids stimulate the pituitary to release hormones. So essentially what we’re doing is we’re giving the horse what it needs to release hormones and then the body decides where to send the hormones for the healing. That’s why we can deal with laminitis. We can help with the IR. Now of course, keep in mind it’s all about the proper nutrition and exercise and things for the horse. But when you add the Equinety to it, it’s going to help enhance everything that you’re doing. So it’s not like it’s the one that one all, be all kind of a thing. But boy, you put this thing in there and it is a definitely a power packed supplement for the horse.

If you’re tuning in and just finding out about this for the first time, go on our Facebook page, look at the reviews. There’s tons and tons and tons of them, our website team equinety.com, but we try to do these podcast once a week, or we are doing them once a week, for testimonial purposes like this. You can hear not from us as a company, but in this case, Lori, you are a customer that was looking for a solution or a possible solution and ended up being exactly what you were looking for. My opinion would be that it probably exceeded your expectations.

Lori Ganacha:                It did. It’s something that he’ll be on for life, which is great. The price is right. I would do anything for any of my horses or my dogs, which by the way, I got a dog that’s going to be going on it as well. But I just have to think of God’s orchestration in this. There was no reason for Rod to bring this up, and I’m not sure if I would’ve had the wherewithal to look into it if it wasn’t brought up to me.

John Dowdy:                 That’s right. That’s right.

Lori Ganacha:                You just have to say, wow, it’s supposed to be this way. So like the perfect storm that created this laminitic episode, there was the perfect storm that created the outcome, which is very, very, very good.

John Dowdy:                 Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah, that’s right. Like I said before, we’re definitely blessed and what it’s doing for horses around the world. That’s why our tagline is helping horses worldwide and I believe there’s a blessing that goes out with every tub.

Lori Ganacha:                [inaudible 00:18:40].

John Dowdy:                 Now other thing, in our pre-call, you had mentioned also the soles had thickened. What can you tell us about that?

Lori Ganacha:                Absolutely. So we haven’t had a lot of moisture in Colorado here for about four months, and so his feet have not really been out in mud or much any thing for four months. He’s growing sole like nobody’s business, and because we haven’t had any moisture to help him slough that soul, it’s pretty apparent that there is a lot of it in there. Just a lot of sole that’s sloughing off. He’s doing it himself. We did get some moisture a couple of weeks ago, which really helped to get that sole shedding out of there. But it is just ridiculous the sheer amount and thickness of it, which anybody with a laminitic horse knows, especially they’ve had a rotating of the coffin bone, you want as much sole depth as you can get. He’s got so much that, and maybe it’s just him in particular, but I don’t think so, that the shedding is ridiculous.

Because I won’t let my farrier cut it out with a knife. In my opinion, it just needs to slough off naturally. But he’s like, “Wow. It just keeps coming.” So I think that that’s … There’s so many horses with thin soles and that creates so many problems. Laminitis is just one of the problems that creates. I do equine body work, so I run across a lot of people and a lot of horses, and a lot of people are talking about thin soles. I don’t know where that comes from or why that is, but if there’s a way to make them thicker, let’s do it.

John Dowdy:                 Sure, absolutely. Yep. No, you’ve got to have a healthy hoof and everything to have a horse that’s rideable and can perform and do the things you need it to do. So that’s awesome.

Lori Ganacha:                Comfortable and happy and happy in his own hooves. It’s amazing. It’s just amazing John, the hoof growth and the sole growth.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, it is, and this is one of the things that we hear this time and time and time again. Of course we have a lot of people, “Oh, does this help with hoof growth?” So I’m really excited that we were able to capture your story on this because this was a pretty important one. Severe type of a situation and we’ve got a couple ads running right now with some x-rays of showing the thickness of souls and plenty of before and after pictures. So if you’re dealing with a situation, whether it be laminitis or thrush or white line or anything to do with the hoof, and need faster, healthier growing hooves then this product, not only does it help with that, it’s going to help with overall healing and balance from the inside out.

Now a lot of times, and we hear this a lot, you’ll have a horse that might be going through, let’s take this particular situation. Or they might be the pasture ornament, retired, or maybe they just are getting older and they don’t feel as well anymore. A lot of feedback we’ve heard, and I’ll ask you this, if you’ve heard of this or seen this for your self, when you start giving the Equinety, they seem to have a bit more spunk and you might see him out there running around, bucking and playing. Is that what you’ve experienced as well with your mustang?

Lori Ganacha:                I have, I have. I’ve stood in my house and took videos of him. It’s like, “Wow, I’m glad I’m not on his back because he can buck like no one’s business. He’ll just do laps of bucking and bucking and that’s beautiful. It’s because he feels good and because he’s happy. So it’s like a happy horse is a happy owner’s horse, and it’s beautiful. I have seen that in him.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Now for those listening, and don’t mistaken this as this product gives your horse some heavy loaded caffeine or anything. There’s nothing in here that makes your horse hot or make them buck or do anything. They just feel better, so they might have a little bit extra giddy up and go. So nothing to be alarmed about. They just feel better. That’s really what it is. Well Lori, I can’t thank you enough for taking the time to share your story here on the Equinety podcast. Before we sign off, is there anything else that you would like to say or give anybody any little push over the fence if they’re still thinking about it or anything else you’d like to say?

Lori Ganacha:                Well, I really appreciate the opportunity to share my story because it’s a big story and I know that there’s other people that have or will be going through the same thing that I’ve gone through. So, if you hear this and unfortunately if you ever get into this situation, because sometimes it just happens, remember this product. It really has been remarkable for us and I think it will be for you and it’s not just laminitis, it’s with anything. It’s worth a try. That’s for sure. If it works for you like it works for me and my horse, I think you made a really wise move. It’s just one of those things that a lot of people may not want to try it unless there a problem, but you might be able to alleviate a problem if you get on board before the problem starts.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, absolutely. We have a lot of people that use it as a preventative type thing because you’re helping to keep those cells operating at their optimal levels. So it might be a good preventative as well. All right, well, Lori Ganacha from Berthoud, Colorado, thank you so much.

Lori Ganacha:                Well, thank you John. I appreciate you having me on your show.

John Dowdy:                 You bet. Bye-Bye.

 

 

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  Lori Ganacha - Severe Laminitis - Thin Soles - Now happier and trimming every 3 weeks   - John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. This week we're swinging out to Berthoud, Colorado,  <br /> <br /> <br /> Lori Ganacha - Severe Laminitis - Thin Soles -<br /> Now happier and trimming every 3 weeks<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. This week we're swinging out to Berthoud, Colorado, and talking with Lori Ganacha. She's got an eight year old mustang that came down with some laminitis and was her first time dealing with something like this. I'm excited to share this one with you because we've been getting a lot of phone calls and emails with horses with hoof issues and thin soles and all this type of stuff, and this is going to be the perfect, at least in my opinion, perfect podcast to touch upon these things and what this mustang has gone through. So without further ado, Lori, welcome to The Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Lori Ganacha:                Thank you, John. It's good to be here. I'm excited to share my story.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 That's great. Well, we're excited to have you. I believe it was back in June of this year, right around the 13th, so it's been about four months ago, you had reached out to us and I believe you and I spoke directly. You were telling me some things that were going on with your mustang. Why don't we just step back in time a little bit and share with everybody what you were going through at that time?<br /> <br /> Lori Ganacha:                Okay, John. Well, I've got an eight year old mustang, as you said, and last May, approximately five, six months ago, he had, we had, I had what I would consider the perfect storm for a laminitic episode with my mustang, who has never had that problem before. I'll tell you what the perfect storm was. It was the beginning of spring. There was green grass coming up. They were out on pasture. I was limiting their pasture time. I've got two other horses as well, but spring grassing I've always been aware of, so it's not a full blown thing. I try to acclimate them to it. So they were on spring grass. He got his hoofs trimmed because he's a barefoot horse, and, without speaking unkindly about the farrier who did it, it was very, very, very short trim. To the point where he was lame on all four feet right after the trim. So that was the second part of this perfect storm.<br /> <br /> The third part was we got a horrific spring storm two days later that was a combination of snow and rain and cold and nasty, windy ick. So that was the third part, and the fourth part of this perfect storm, I think, was the spring hormonal levels in this mustang. He came out of that storm because there wasn't a lot we could do during it. I got the vet out here, and he was doing okay in the mud because he had a little bit of insulation and a little bit of cold on his feet, but we took x-rays of this lame horse and he had rotated slightly in his coffin bone.<br /> <br /> As I said, his feet were just ridiculously short trimmed and my vet basically said in a nutshell, "The next two weeks is going to be critical for him. I can't give you a great outlook on this, but I'm not going to say it couldn't be, but I'm not going to do that for you." So we also tested him for insulin resistance, which he was, and he was put on a pretty strenuous diet. She told me he's by no means obese but he needs to drop about 40-50 pounds just to take some pressure off of his feet. So that was where we sat there. I was going through this two week period, trying to keep him as comfortable as possible. I did get him in some soft ride boots, but he was pretty sore dude, let me tell you. He ended up going in his stall for the most part. Because he was so sore, we didn't want him to do anything silly if he had the opportunity to do it, like think he feels good and go run and buck or anything.<br /> <br /> Plus he had the soft ride boots on, which was keeping him a little bit less mobile. So the outcome was not looking completely rosy. I, John, have never dealt with laminitis in a horse before, John Dowdy clean 26:04
033 – Kristen Wright – Trailer Accident – Superior Hoof Recovery with Equinety https://www.teamequinety.com/033-kristen-wright-trailer-accident-superior-hoof-recovery-with-equinety/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 13:00:38 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1762     Kristen Wright - Trailer Accident - Superior Hoof Recovery with Equinety   John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. I am excited this week because we've got Kristen Wright out of Commerce, Georgia on this week's podcast and she has gone through something that everybody hopes they never have to go through. And that's a trailering accident with severe injury to her horse. And without further ado, Kristen, welcome to the Equinety Podcast. Kristen Wright:             Thank you, guys. It's very nice talking to you guys and joining you on this beautiful day. John Dowdy:                 Yes. Well, and I tell you the story that you have is something that everyone hopes they never have to go through. And unfortunately, you have gone through a pretty bad thing, but things are definitely looking positive. So let's go back to, Reno, is your horse's name? Kristen Wright:             Yes. John Dowdy:                 And so tell us about Reno, how long you've had him? I understand he's a 1300-pound buckskin, so no small animal here. But tell us how you acquired him and everything about him. Kristen Wright:             I acquired Reno as a three-year-old and he had a pretty bad attitude. He was pretty pushy. He was just the resale project that I had planned on putting some time on in getting his bucking issues under control and sending him down the road. But he won my heart over and we ended up being a team. So come September 4th, I've owned him three years now and he has ended up being my best friend and my best hauling and partner and my only hauling partner for the past three years. So he's a cool guy. John Dowdy:                 Now, I understand also, he's a barrel horse. Kristen Wright:             He is a barrel horse. John Dowdy:                 Tell us how he has done since you've a transformed him from this project into running patterns. Kristen Wright:             Honestly, he's blown away every expectation. He's helped me reach every goal that I've set. We've competed with some of the best of the best and we stayed at the top. We placed in our first rodeo, we got second at our second rodeo ever this year. We usually, run 1D/2D about everywhere we go. And this whole situation is a little heartbreaking because we're sidelined for a little while, but we're hoping for a comeback for sure. John Dowdy:                 Sure. And you had hoped just to win one race this year, but you actually won two with him? Kristen Wright:             Yes. My goal was to win a barrel race this year and we've ended up winning two this year. One of those we were actually the only person in the 1D and that was an absolutely thrill. It wasn't the biggest show, but a lot of times that's not what matters sometimes. John Dowdy:                 Right. Yeah. Getting the experience with him out there and yep. So then around, let's see, when was it? August 31st of this year, you are headed to an event and tell us what happened there? Kristen Wright:             We were heading to a Tennessee to a barrel race, me and my mother and we were probably about an hour from our destination and the unthinkable happens and somebody in front of me... I was only traveling about 45 miles an hour and they gave no warning that they were stopping. So it was either go into oncoming traffic or go off an embankment, hit the truck or try and stop. And I tried to stop. And I didn't hit the truck. I did get stopped. But the way I had to stop ended up by sending him through my tack room wall, which is a metal wall that separates the tack room from the horse area. John Dowdy:                 So once everything got settled down, as you made your way back to go check on him, what did that look like? Visualize. We're all listening here, but just trying to picture this as you? Kristen Wright:             It was kind of a blood scene. It was something scary because I didn't realize where it was coming...

 

 

Kristen Wright – Trailer Accident – Superior Hoof Recovery with Equinety

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. I am excited this week because we’ve got Kristen Wright out of Commerce, Georgia on this week’s podcast and she has gone through something that everybody hopes they never have to go through. And that’s a trailering accident with severe injury to her horse. And without further ado, Kristen, welcome to the Equinety Podcast.

Kristen Wright:             Thank you, guys. It’s very nice talking to you guys and joining you on this beautiful day.

John Dowdy:                 Yes. Well, and I tell you the story that you have is something that everyone hopes they never have to go through. And unfortunately, you have gone through a pretty bad thing, but things are definitely looking positive. So let’s go back to, Reno, is your horse’s name?

Kristen Wright:             Yes.

John Dowdy:                 And so tell us about Reno, how long you’ve had him? I understand he’s a 1300-pound buckskin, so no small animal here. But tell us how you acquired him and everything about him.

Kristen Wright:             I acquired Reno as a three-year-old and he had a pretty bad attitude. He was pretty pushy. He was just the resale project that I had planned on putting some time on in getting his bucking issues under control and sending him down the road. But he won my heart over and we ended up being a team. So come September 4th, I’ve owned him three years now and he has ended up being my best friend and my best hauling and partner and my only hauling partner for the past three years. So he’s a cool guy.

John Dowdy:                 Now, I understand also, he’s a barrel horse.

Kristen Wright:             He is a barrel horse.

John Dowdy:                 Tell us how he has done since you’ve a transformed him from this project into running patterns.

Kristen Wright:             Honestly, he’s blown away every expectation. He’s helped me reach every goal that I’ve set. We’ve competed with some of the best of the best and we stayed at the top. We placed in our first rodeo, we got second at our second rodeo ever this year. We usually, run 1D/2D about everywhere we go. And this whole situation is a little heartbreaking because we’re sidelined for a little while, but we’re hoping for a comeback for sure.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. And you had hoped just to win one race this year, but you actually won two with him?

Kristen Wright:             Yes. My goal was to win a barrel race this year and we’ve ended up winning two this year. One of those we were actually the only person in the 1D and that was an absolutely thrill. It wasn’t the biggest show, but a lot of times that’s not what matters sometimes.

John Dowdy:                 Right. Yeah. Getting the experience with him out there and yep. So then around, let’s see, when was it? August 31st of this year, you are headed to an event and tell us what happened there?

Kristen Wright:             We were heading to a Tennessee to a barrel race, me and my mother and we were probably about an hour from our destination and the unthinkable happens and somebody in front of me… I was only traveling about 45 miles an hour and they gave no warning that they were stopping. So it was either go into oncoming traffic or go off an embankment, hit the truck or try and stop. And I tried to stop. And I didn’t hit the truck. I did get stopped. But the way I had to stop ended up by sending him through my tack room wall, which is a metal wall that separates the tack room from the horse area.

John Dowdy:                 So once everything got settled down, as you made your way back to go check on him, what did that look like? Visualize. We’re all listening here, but just trying to picture this as you?

Kristen Wright:             It was kind of a blood scene. It was something scary because I didn’t realize where it was coming from or what really was going on up until I got in the trailer. And I realized that his hoof had went through the welds on the metal wall and so he was hung by his hoof. So the sheets metal, which is what the wall is made of was actually cutting off the right side of his right front foot with every movement he made or I made. It was cutting deeper and deeper.

Kristen Wright:             Luckily, I had my mother with me and she had gotten on the inside of the tack room and I stayed in the horse area. Because I knew I could keep him calmer and we had to seesaw his foot back to the widest point where it originally went through just to get his foot out. And at that point, there was a few people that had stopped to help and that we are very thankful for them also.

Kristen Wright:             But we ended up about the time we got him free. Like I said, my mom was helping and I went to pull Reno’s foot out, but Reno took a step and he ended up stepping on my mom’s hand. So her hand was also broke in the whole situation. And once we got him free, I realized the extent the blood was just pouring everywhere. It was spraying, pouring. It was a site that I truly don’t ever wish on anybody or do I want to see again.

John Dowdy:                 No way. So at this point, were you able to have somebody come out then or did you just have to wrap things up and try to get back home to a vet or what did you do at this point?

Kristen Wright:             At that point, I laid on the ground for what felt like hours and hours, but it was about an hour waiting on an emergency vet. I laid on the ground holding his foot back together and the blood was just pouring over my hands and I was just stunned at the whole situation. So I feel like my mind wasn’t working just right and I was more or less concerned with the bleeding, getting the bleeding stopped.

Kristen Wright:             And so we ended up having to wait for that vet. Well, when that vet got there, it was one of the situations. They threw a pressure bandage on and sent us on our way. And so we ended up having to have another truck and trailer come and get him just because I couldn’t put him through going back in the same trailer.

John Dowdy:                 So what happened at that point? So he goes back to the vet clinic, they do x-rays, and what did they find in addition to the visual damage? What happened internally in that hoof?

Kristen Wright:             What happened internally is we sustained a P3 break, which is the coffin bone break and I think it’s a articular wing break. So it’s the wing section of the coffin bone. That was honestly very shattering news along with how deep everything had cut down. It cut about 25% down into the hoof itself about down to the nail holes. And so at that point, the vet was just like, “Look, we’re going to put a hoof cast on the bottom part to try and keep the coffin bone break still and we’ll play it by year.”

John Dowdy:                 So they didn’t really have any positive things? It was really just a repair situation or try to get everything to a baseline so they can even try to work with what they’ve got.

Kristen Wright:             Yeah, yeah. It was literally just trying to find a baseline to see if it was going to heal or if it was… Nobody really knew at that point.

John Dowdy:                 Because also the coronary band is all damaged.

Kristen Wright:             Yes. Yeah. The coronary band took a very rough… It got cut off along with some through the pastern and everything was pretty much damaged.

John Dowdy:                 So now going to the first vet, so now the coronary band’s damaged. You’ve got a coffin bone that’s broke. The hoof is about sheered off. And by the way, for those tuning in on our website at teamequinety.com which is one of the places this podcast will be posted and the podcast is also transcribed. We’ll put some pictures in there, which are a bit on the graphic side, but you can see what Kristen was dealing with here initially. And so now you go to the first vet. Tell us about what was going on there, what the vet was recommending, and what they had to do for Reno?

Kristen Wright:             The recommendations they had were kind of simple stuff and I followed what he had advised to a T and within a couple of days the foot just it was turning kind of brown. It did have a little bit of a smell to it. And then Reno started having diarrhea. So I started kind of blowing up the vet phone and was like, “Something’s not right. Something’s wrong. What needs to be done, can we get you back out?” And they ended up sending us to UGA, which is one of the biggest hospitals here in Georgia.

John Dowdy:                 And with that, so they ended up having to or was their findings or recommendations or anything significantly different from the first vet or what did they do differently over there?

Kristen Wright:             UGA pretty much went in as we need to check everything, every vital, every ounce of bloodwork, kidney functions to figure out why he has diarrhea, why everything’s going on, why did this turn necrotic? And then they went in and cut all of the necrotic tissue out. There was some cartilage that had died off also. So they had to go in and cut that out also. And they wanted to see how deep it was cut down into the hoof.

Kristen Wright:             They knew that the coffin bone break was there because they had got the x-ray forwarded to them. So they already knew about that. So pretty much it was addressing the wound and how to heal the wound or assess if the quality of life was going to be good enough to keep fighting to keep him alive or if it was too significant to keep him alive.

John Dowdy:                 Because I imagine that was probably going through your mind as well is all of this worth putting him through or is there a chance that we can come out of this? That was probably iffy for a little while as well.

Kristen Wright:             It was very iffy, especially when the vets told us, “You know, look, we need to take this 12 hours at a time.” That’s really scary, especially when it’s your best friend on the line. And I would never want to put him in pain that he doesn’t need to be put in if it’s not going to heal. So that’s kind of where we were at UGA. The very first visit, they weren’t as positive, but I understand they didn’t want to give false hope. So we left it at that. But we went home and we prayed about it a lot and we started Equinety and that’s when everything started changing around.

John Dowdy:                 Now, prior to the Equinety, what other things did you have him on for just like the time?

Kristen Wright:             Reno has been on a Kimmie’s Cocktail, which is an all-natural supplement. It’s a overall bloomer. It just pretty much helps them on the road. It’s got every mineral vitamin that they need. I’ve never had issues with ulcers even though we compete every weekend. We’ve got amazing coat, amazing mane, and tail. This guy, he’s just pretty and so cocktail was always our go-to. But after the extent of these injuries, we knew that wouldn’t be enough.

John Dowdy:                 And with the injury now you had him on Bute, did you have any him on anything else?

Kristen Wright:             Yes, he was on Bute and he was also on Equioxx, which is another pain medication. And he was honestly getting two scoops of Bute in the AM, two scoops in the PM and this is all per vet. At the first UGA visit, they were like, let’s wean them down and see how he reacts. And they were honestly worried about laminitis setting in and causing more injury to the opposing legs that weren’t injured but could have became injured if we had put too much stress.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. So he had been on all that for a couple of weeks at this time. By the time you went over to UGA?

Kristen Wright:             Yeah.

John Dowdy:                 So when you realize that, okay, well he’s going to need a little bit more than or something else to help, then you went on the Internet search as a lot of folks do. And what were you initially searching for and then what popped up?

Kristen Wright:             I was honestly searching for healing of bone, which I know, especially in horses that’s a lot different than humans. And so I was on a search of people that have had coffin bone breaks before and how they healed it or breaks period. I was just kind of on a hunt of, all right, let’s get ahead of this and see what we can do. And Equinety kept popping up and that’s when I started watching their videos and reading everybody’s reviews. And I’ve seen some off and on reviews, but there was way too much good not to try it.

John Dowdy:                 And so you brought the Equinety in and you had reached out to us to ask one scoop versus two scoops. And of course, when we’re talking about an injured horse or one that maybe have come out of surgery, even for the performance horse that doesn’t really have any issues, we always recommend two scoops. Because it just helps with the recovery whether it be performance recovery or in this case we’re talking about an injury recovery. And so now you’re two weeks in, you start the Equinety I believe at the 1st of September timeframe. September 6th or something like that.

Kristen Wright:             Yes.

John Dowdy:                 Today is at the time of this recording is October 14th, so we’re talking five weeks.

Kristen Wright:             Yep.

John Dowdy:                 So what has now transpired over five weeks? Now, by the way, the horse was casted up and you couldn’t see. Tell us about that. So they’re going to put it in a cast and tell us about cast changes.

Kristen Wright:             He was in a full cast from the pastern down. It was like a big 10-pound cast. This thing was pretty huge and we couldn’t doctor the wound. I couldn’t see the wound. I think that was probably the scariest part, especially the first casting is that you know how bad that wound is, but you couldn’t see it, you couldn’t doctor it. And we’re naturally fixers. So that was a really rough two weeks, especially when they’re like give it 12 hours at a time, take it 12 hours at a time. It was pretty scary.

Kristen Wright:             Our second visit to UGA is when I was scared to death. I didn’t want to see it. I wasn’t sure what to expect. And when they finally got that cast cut off, it was like a breath of fresh air. It was like, “Oh my gosh, what happened?” And I started thinking, I’m like, “The only product that we’ve added to his diet is the Equinety.” And by our third visit, we have not complete healing. But two-thirds of the injury is healed. The coronary band too. There’s just the coronary band is healed and we do have growth.

John Dowdy:                 And how many months ahead of schedule are they saying that this injury has come along?

Kristen Wright:             We are months, I want to say probably closer to six months. They were thinking it would take a long time just to get any amount of growth at all.

John Dowdy:                 That is incredible. And for those tuning in for the first time, and maybe this is the first time you’re hearing about the Equinety product. It’s 100% pure amino acids. And essentially in short, what we’re doing is we’re giving the body what it needs to release the necessary hormones, which help the body heal at a cellular level. So this includes a skeletal, ligaments, tendons, muscle, everything. And this is really what you’re experiencing at this point. So now we’re 45 days into this. When is the next checkup?

Kristen Wright:             We go back on the 22nd and he is actually completely out of the full cast. He’s not even in a cast anymore, which we thought we would have to cast him for months. But they felt confident enough in the way he’s healed to put him in what’s called a rim cast. So it goes around the bottom of the hoof to hold the coffin bone break. So the wound itself, I can actually see the wound now and I can see the growth and I can see the healing in the coronary band.

John Dowdy:                 And as far as lameness goes, where is he at this point? The walking versus anything else?

Kristen Wright:             This is the most exciting part. He’s actually sounded a walk that was pretty much even the vets stated in our last vet report that they were very impressed with the fact that he sounded a walk. Of course, we really don’t want him trotting around or anything like that. But that doesn’t say he doesn’t try so.

John Dowdy:                 So I’m going to back up too because with all the Bute and Equioxx that you had him on, so he’s not taking that anymore? Is he just using the Equinety?

Kristen Wright:             Yes. He’s just using the Equinety. He has not had Bute or anything for pain in probably about three and a half weeks. He’s been off of all medications, all everything.

John Dowdy:                 Just healing up real nice.

Kristen Wright:             Yes.

John Dowdy:                 That’s exciting. Well, I tell you what, if this story doesn’t move a person listening, I don’t know what does. Because it’s absolutely horrific. And I know both you and Reno have been through a lot here. But everything is looking very, very positive. I would love to do a followup podcast with you in the coming months, so we can do another checkup on Reno. That would be great to hear.

John Dowdy:                 In the meantime, as I mentioned before in our podcast on our website, I’ll put those pictures so people can take a look at those, which they are pretty brutal. But the-

Kristen Wright:             They are.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, the before ones anyway even the after ones, they’re healing up very nice. So it’s great to hear. So well-

Kristen Wright:             It’s great to hear and it’s great to see.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, absolutely. Well, hopefully, nobody else has to go through what you had to go through. It does happen, but with any type of injury, I hope that those tuning in will take a look and try the Equinety product. And Kristen, is there anything else that you want to add to this story or maybe let anybody else know that might be tuning in?

Kristen Wright:             I am very skeptical on all supplements. I’m not a big supplement person. I’ve always stuck to the more all-natural route and Equinety, I have all faith in Equinety. I literally am blown away with the Equinety product and what it has done for us. It is saved my guy’s life and he’s going to be a miracle story and hopefully, his come back story is bigger than this.

John Dowdy:                 That would be pretty darn exciting right there. You’d get him back and running again. Holy smokes.

Kristen Wright:             Yes, sir.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Well, awesome.

Kristen Wright:             And he’s young and he’s got his whole life ahead of him. And so what’s a year off?

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. That’s right.

Kristen Wright:             Some people forget that. What’s a year? I understand he’s healing from an injury, but it’s hopefully healing it helping his mind and everything too. And that’s all we could pray for and hope for.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, absolutely. So awesome. Well, Kristen Wright from Commerce, Georgia. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your Equinety story here on the Equinety Podcast.

Kristen Wright:             Yes, sir. Thank you.

John Dowdy:                 All right, bye-bye.

Kristen Wright:             Bye.

 

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  -   Kristen Wright - Trailer Accident - Superior Hoof Recovery with Equinety   - John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. I am excited this week because we've got Kristen Wright out of Commerce,  <br /> <br />  <br /> Kristen Wright - Trailer Accident - Superior Hoof Recovery with Equinety<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. I am excited this week because we've got Kristen Wright out of Commerce, Georgia on this week's podcast and she has gone through something that everybody hopes they never have to go through. And that's a trailering accident with severe injury to her horse. And without further ado, Kristen, welcome to the Equinety Podcast.<br /> <br /> Kristen Wright:             Thank you, guys. It's very nice talking to you guys and joining you on this beautiful day.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yes. Well, and I tell you the story that you have is something that everyone hopes they never have to go through. And unfortunately, you have gone through a pretty bad thing, but things are definitely looking positive. So let's go back to, Reno, is your horse's name?<br /> <br /> Kristen Wright:             Yes.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 And so tell us about Reno, how long you've had him? I understand he's a 1300-pound buckskin, so no small animal here. But tell us how you acquired him and everything about him.<br /> <br /> Kristen Wright:             I acquired Reno as a three-year-old and he had a pretty bad attitude. He was pretty pushy. He was just the resale project that I had planned on putting some time on in getting his bucking issues under control and sending him down the road. But he won my heart over and we ended up being a team. So come September 4th, I've owned him three years now and he has ended up being my best friend and my best hauling and partner and my only hauling partner for the past three years. So he's a cool guy.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Now, I understand also, he's a barrel horse.<br /> <br /> Kristen Wright:             He is a barrel horse.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Tell us how he has done since you've a transformed him from this project into running patterns.<br /> <br /> Kristen Wright:             Honestly, he's blown away every expectation. He's helped me reach every goal that I've set. We've competed with some of the best of the best and we stayed at the top. We placed in our first rodeo, we got second at our second rodeo ever this year. We usually, run 1D/2D about everywhere we go. And this whole situation is a little heartbreaking because we're sidelined for a little while, but we're hoping for a comeback for sure.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Sure. And you had hoped just to win one race this year, but you actually won two with him?<br /> <br /> Kristen Wright:             Yes. My goal was to win a barrel race this year and we've ended up winning two this year. One of those we were actually the only person in the 1D and that was an absolutely thrill. It wasn't the biggest show, but a lot of times that's not what matters sometimes.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Right. Yeah. Getting the experience with him out there and yep. So then around, let's see, when was it? August 31st of this year, you are headed to an event and tell us what happened there?<br /> <br /> Kristen Wright:             We were heading to a Tennessee to a barrel race, me and my mother and we were probably about an hour from our destination and the unthinkable happens and somebody in front of me... I was only traveling about 45 miles an hour and they gave no warning that they were stopping. So it was either go into oncoming traffic or go off an embankment, hit the truck or try and stop. And I tried to stop. And I didn't hit the truck. I did get stopped. But the way I had to stop ended up by sending him through my tack room wall, which is a metal wall that separates the tack room from the horse area.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 So once everything got settled down, as you made your way back to go check on him, what did that look like? John Dowdy clean 22:44
032 – Cheyenne Wimberley – Ranked 14 in the world – NFR – High Performance Horses – Recovery – Stamina – Focus – Healthy and Happy Horses https://www.teamequinety.com/032-cheyenne-wimberley-ranked-14-in-the-world-nfr-high-performance-horses-recovery-stamina-focus-healthy-and-happy-horses/ Wed, 09 Oct 2019 13:00:12 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1752     Cheyenne Wimberley - Ranked 14 in the world - NFR - High Performance Horses - Recovery - Stamina - Focus - Healthy and Happy Horses John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am so excited this week to have on Cheyenne Wimberley out of Stevenville, Texas. Cheyenne, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yes, thanks. Thanks for having me. We're ready to talk some Equinety today. John Dowdy:                 Well that's great. I'm excited to have you on and for those tuning in and thinking to yourself, hey, I know that name, Cheyenne Wimberley. That's right, she is ranked number 14 in the world. Going to the NFR, how does that make you feel? Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well, it's been hard to sink in but now it's getting exciting because it's been 20 years since I've been to the NFR, so it's exciting to actually be prepared to kind of try to get back to reality over there in Las Vegas. John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Now, so 20 years. You were first at the NFR 97, 98. Tell us a little bit about that and your hiatus that you took. Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well, I had a really great horse back in 97 and 98 and then in 98 he had a career ending injury. And so I have taken a break. I went back to school and graduated and did some life things and I continued to train for charity horses and train my personal horses. But I didn't rodeo as much as I did. And so this past year has really been a change in reality of getting back on the road. John Dowdy:                 Speaking of that, being on the road, what was your favorite rodeo this year? Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well I think I would have to say Cheyenne, which is kind of ironic. But Cheyenne's in July and at that time I had been rodeoing all year, but I hadn't really pushed myself and I had three horses that I was riding at that time and I had only ran them a couple times a piece, trying to get with them. And then I ran the fastest time of the rodeo at Cheyenne. And so that was a big turning point at a really tough time of year. Because at that point you either need to keep going really hard or you need to go home. And so at that point it was like, oh, those horses were starting to really, we were starting to click, things were going good. And so that was really a turning point for my year. John Dowdy:                 Yeah, so running the fastest time, then you're thinking, well hey, maybe there's a shot. We're just going to go all in on this thing and see what happens. Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yeah. At that point it was like, you know what? We're going to keep going. We're going to put our head down and see if we can grind it out a little bit. But that only starts the next month. That really was a grueling month. But when you're at this level, you either have to get all in or get all out. We decided to get all in at that point. John Dowdy:                 Yeah, pretty much living well on the road 24/7. Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yes, living the dream. John Dowdy:                 That's right. Absolutely. For those that are looking or that maybe this is a kind of a dream for them to reach this high level, what's the best advice well that you've been given? Just through the years in barrel racing and rodeo in general? Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well, I'd have to start, if I was getting into barrel racing from the start, I would make sure that my horsemanship skills were up to par. I think that the whole industry starts with horsemanship. Then it makes the rest of the learning a little bit easier. And then I would, there's tons of clinicians out there and I would pick a style that you like and I would stick with that style because it's easy to jump around. But then you never really master one and I would learn and just become a student of the game and go through the levels. Nowadays there's so many levels. You can start from a 5D level and work your way to the 1D level. And once you get to that 1D level,

 

 

Cheyenne Wimberley – Ranked 14 in the world – NFR – High Performance
Horses – Recovery – Stamina – Focus – Healthy and Happy Horses

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am so excited this week to have on Cheyenne Wimberley out of Stevenville, Texas. Cheyenne, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yes, thanks. Thanks for having me. We’re ready to talk some Equinety today.

John Dowdy:                 Well that’s great. I’m excited to have you on and for those tuning in and thinking to yourself, hey, I know that name, Cheyenne Wimberley. That’s right, she is ranked number 14 in the world. Going to the NFR, how does that make you feel?

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well, it’s been hard to sink in but now it’s getting exciting because it’s been 20 years since I’ve been to the NFR, so it’s exciting to actually be prepared to kind of try to get back to reality over there in Las Vegas.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Now, so 20 years. You were first at the NFR 97, 98. Tell us a little bit about that and your hiatus that you took.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well, I had a really great horse back in 97 and 98 and then in 98 he had a career ending injury. And so I have taken a break. I went back to school and graduated and did some life things and I continued to train for charity horses and train my personal horses. But I didn’t rodeo as much as I did. And so this past year has really been a change in reality of getting back on the road.

John Dowdy:                 Speaking of that, being on the road, what was your favorite rodeo this year?

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well I think I would have to say Cheyenne, which is kind of ironic. But Cheyenne’s in July and at that time I had been rodeoing all year, but I hadn’t really pushed myself and I had three horses that I was riding at that time and I had only ran them a couple times a piece, trying to get with them. And then I ran the fastest time of the rodeo at Cheyenne. And so that was a big turning point at a really tough time of year. Because at that point you either need to keep going really hard or you need to go home. And so at that point it was like, oh, those horses were starting to really, we were starting to click, things were going good. And so that was really a turning point for my year.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, so running the fastest time, then you’re thinking, well hey, maybe there’s a shot. We’re just going to go all in on this thing and see what happens.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yeah. At that point it was like, you know what? We’re going to keep going. We’re going to put our head down and see if we can grind it out a little bit. But that only starts the next month. That really was a grueling month. But when you’re at this level, you either have to get all in or get all out. We decided to get all in at that point.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, pretty much living well on the road 24/7.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yes, living the dream.

John Dowdy:                 That’s right. Absolutely. For those that are looking or that maybe this is a kind of a dream for them to reach this high level, what’s the best advice well that you’ve been given? Just through the years in barrel racing and rodeo in general?

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well, I’d have to start, if I was getting into barrel racing from the start, I would make sure that my horsemanship skills were up to par. I think that the whole industry starts with horsemanship. Then it makes the rest of the learning a little bit easier. And then I would, there’s tons of clinicians out there and I would pick a style that you like and I would stick with that style because it’s easy to jump around. But then you never really master one and I would learn and just become a student of the game and go through the levels. Nowadays there’s so many levels. You can start from a 5D level and work your way to the 1D level. And once you get to that 1D level, then you probably are ready to start entering the rodeos and going to the amateur ranks onto the professional ranks.

Of course it’s like anything, when you’re mastering that skill and you’ve learned one thing, it’s hard to jump around and continue to master that skill. When you’re trying to work your level up and if that’s your goal is to work up to the highest level, then you have to continue to master each skill at the time. But there, the good thing of today is that, there is lots of learning material and you can really be a student of the game.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Absolutely. The technology that we have today and online stuff and plenty of clinics around for sure.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Correct.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. With, here’s a good question for you, at least I think it is. With the rodeo season as long as it is, all the miles that you travel, what keeps you motivated? Typically, what’s your day look like? Especially maybe after you’ve come out of a bit of a slump. What do you do to keep yourself high energy and focused on the goal that you’re trying to achieve?

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well, I’m a person of pretty high goals and so if this year I haven’t rodeoed professionally full time in 20 years. When I, it became a goal that hey, I’m going to make the NFR, then going home wasn’t an option. And when going home is not an option, you have to stay positive to reach that goal. And I surround myself with positive people. Negativity is a killer of all source. It’ll drag the whole rig down. But when you’re running at that level, there’s so many things that are out of your control, the weather, the ground, you’re indoors and outdoors. But the one thing you can control is your positivity and your goal. Because that goal is to make it to the end. And I just reminded myself constantly that, you know what? We’re out here for a reason and that reason is to accomplish it.

And it’s a high goal. And sometimes a lot of people don’t get to accomplish it, but I bet they’ve proven to themselves that they are able to accomplish it. And maybe that’s one of the building blocks to the next part. It wasn’t like I was going to have a lot of do overs, so it was like, you know what? We’re going to put our head down. We’re going to work as hard as we can. We’re going to keep the horses as healthy as we can and we’re going to try to accomplish the goal that we set.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Now you just mentioned, and I touched on this before and we kind of skipped over it. You haven’t been back to the NFR in 20 years and I had mentioned earlier about the hiatus. You had a career ending injury with the horse that you had back in 99. What did you do through those 20 years there up until this point where you just came back into the picture?

Cheyenne Wimberley:   I’d like to say I was just a couch potato, buy anyway, I went back to college. I had about a year left of college and I went back to college and then I started working in the insurance industry and I worked the industry, that industry for several years, for about five years and I continued at that time to train horses for myself and I never quit riding ever. But and then I started, I would say probably I got into the breeding business a little bit and I had four or five brood mares and I raised and bred my own colts and trained them, sold them. Then I would say probably it’s been in the last 10 years I have raised or bought name brand, I say name brand and I mean the dash to fame, the streak of things, a Frenchman’s guys, I would buy one or two colts a year. I would get them to buy them as two year olds. I would train them for charity them and get them seasoned and ready for somebody to buy them to go rodeo on. That was the end goal.

Now, some of those don’t make it to that level and those horses were sold at the level that they needed to be sold to. But it was kind of a business that I was, I would ride about anywhere from five to eight horses a year, selling the ones that I make and bought, make and sell. That’s kind of the rotation of it. And I’ve done that for the last probably 10 years up to now. It wasn’t like I was out of the game. I still did it a lot. I just didn’t do it at that level.

John Dowdy:                 As you’re out on the road doing these things, was it the Cheyenne run that kind of said, “Hey, maybe we’ve got a chance here to get back to the NFR?” Or what was your mindset?

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yeah, I don’t say that. I was offered some really great horses this year. I don’t own couple of the horses that I’m taking. Robyn Weaver owns them and they were great horses. They’d been outstanding horses through their furturity and derby years. They’re outstanding horses. I was offered those couple of horses and it was kind of one of those things I had another two horses. I had a horse that I had one Chicago on the WCRA on and that was a really good building horse. Then I had another horse that I’d had for about two years and her name’s Dash to Sue’s and she was continually getting better and better and better, and I was starting to run her outside. I had these combination of horses and then I thought to myself, you know what? I may never have this group of horses in my barn again.

If there was any inclination that I might want to go again, it would be a good time to try it now. But now it was kind of hard because I wasn’t qualified into any of the bigger building rodeos. I kind of had to do it the hard way. You kind of had to start at that bottom level, try to get into the next rodeo and the next rodeo and travel more than you probably would ever want to travel. But when you’re starting at that ground level, you’ve got to start somewhere. Even though I had been to the finals 20 years ago, I didn’t have any kind of leeway getting into anything. I wasn’t granted an entry. You had to start from the bottom and sure enough just kind of get after it. Try to enter at the right places, go to the right rodeos and win, win at the right ones.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, that’s incredible. That is an incredible story.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   I like to say that, we all like a good comeback story. And after 20 years it sounds pretty good.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, absolutely. No doubt. I got to ask you this because being around a lot of professional athletes through the years, they all seem to have rituals, quirks, anything like that. Is there anything that you do specifically that’s just your own little thing before you run a pattern?

Cheyenne Wimberley:   I like to be prepared, real prepared for myself. I usually, this time around I hadn’t been to some of the places and I had been to some of them. And by now they’ve built new arenas, new facilities, it’s not the same. I would make sure that I would find a video of somebody running barrels in that arena. I felt like that prepared me, pre-prepared me. It got me in the state of mind of hey where the barrels were setted, kind of where the alley was and maybe what horse I was going to ride because I rode four horses throughout the year and through the summertime I rode three. And so I was riding three different horses every weekend. I wanted to make sure, it’s kind of like a dice game, but I didn’t want to roll the dice and hopefully I picked the right one. I wanted to make sure when I got on that horse that was the right horse for the right pattern at the right time.

And I didn’t do any quarterbacking when I picked that horse for that pen. I went with that. And most of the time I had picked that horse before I got there because I had prepared myself through videos and preparation of getting there. And so I felt like it wasn’t going to be something new when I got there.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Not just some pull up and willy nilly.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yeah. I don’t do very, I wanted to make sure when I got there I kind of knew what I was getting into because sometimes you don’t have all that time to get up there and oh I want to do this, this and that, or get to ride in the arena or stuff like that. I felt like being prepared before I got there was really a benefit for myself.

John Dowdy:                 Absolutely. Also through the years you also have a saddle company.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yes. Yeah, my family, we started Cowboy Classic Saddlery about 25 years ago and my dad started it and I’m the only child so of course you get brought into all things family. But anyways, yes, we sell numerous saddles. We sell a lot of trophy saddles. We make several different saddle lines for a couple of different barrel racers and we majority sell roping, team roping saddles and barrel saddles. That’s really our business. And we’ve done a lot of trophy lines. We’ve made saddles for the college national finals, for the NFR, for the Texas circuit finals. Several circuits. We’re currently doing the southeastern circuit finals, so we make a lot of saddles for several different organizations and individuals. It’s been a great business. My mom and I continued to run it when we were on the road. Thank goodness for FaceTime so you could run your shop while you’re driving.

John Dowdy:                 No doubt.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yeah, technology changed everything for everybody because I don’t know what we would do if we hadn’t had technology.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Now the website is cowboyclassicsaddlery.com

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yes.

John Dowdy:                 Awesome. Well anybody listening…

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yes. And if you call you’re probably going to talk to my mom or myself. We’re still pretty, we’re definitely hands on. We didn’t get to the summer but we usually, majority of the time we are messing with every saddle that leaves the shop.

John Dowdy:                 Great. Yeah. Getting into the, your program for your horses to keep them in top shape. What are some of the things that you’ve done through the years prior to coming across the Equinety, because we’ll get into a little bit of that. What are some of the things that you do to keep your horses in tip top shape?

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well I would say when I’m, I first like to start with a foundation. I feel like a good clean feed is really important. I try to feed zero sugars, no molasses. I personally feed oats and sunflower seeds. I do not feed a feed that has any type of byproduct in or any type of soy. I like to start clean and then I try to find the best hay quality that I can feed. We also turn most of our horses out on a rotation through grass and we have coastal Bermuda in our area. We don’t have them all in stalls all the time. They’re all rotated in through some kind of pasture. But I feel like when you start with a good basic program, then you can add to your program what you feel like your horse needs.

I’ve always said herbs from Equine Natural Care. I feed their herbs and I fed herbs for years and years, but I also educated myself with herbs so I don’t feed the same herbs over and over. I feed what I feel like that horse at that time kind of needs to get it through its system. I’m pretty basic so I feel I feed along that line. When I came to the point of Equinety, I actually had talked to a couple of different friends that I knew who was getting it and I kind of asked around about their stories, but when I started leading Equinety, it was simply amazing the difference that I was seeing in the horses that were getting fed Equinety. Maybe something that was a little bit more added to such a high performance athlete. Their recovery, they were making two, three runs a weekend and we’re talking every weekend driving 400 miles in between each run.

They were making those runs every weekend from July to September and they were just rebounding greatly. They looked outstanding. They look like show horses, they never lost weight, their hair coat was shiny, dappled out, and they might be a little bit tired on Monday, but on Tuesday they were ready to go. And it was just amazing that you could see that difference on such a athletic level.

John Dowdy:                 Right. Well and those for tuning in for the first time, what I’ll give a little bit of education on what the Equinety product is. It’s 100% pure amino acids. There’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches, just 100% pure aminos. But these are specifically formulated and put together to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body. And that’s what releases the necessary hormones, which help keep the cells operating at their optimal levels. When it comes to high performance horses like we’re talking about in this case, faster recovery, more stamina, focus, they haul better, their recovery just overall, they look fantastic and you get into horses that are having all kinds of other issues, whatever it might be. Again, we’re giving the body what it needs to release those hormones so the body can help heal itself. It’s customizing to each horse. I would just guess that when people saw you pulling into the showgrounds, they’re like, ah crap, here comes Cheyenne and those good looking horses.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well I will say numerous times I would have people say, “Gosh, your horses look outstanding. I can’t believe they look like this, being hauled.” And because really and truly the trailering is just probably harder on them as the running. And we say that we weren’t really going that far, but we were going 400 miles every day. We were going back and forth because you’re just, you’re up in the northwest at that time. You’re just making some big circles. And it doesn’t feel like that bad because you’re not driving all night. But it’s still a lot of miles. And they were looking outstanding. They came home looking as good as they did when they left. It was just, it was crazy. It was just one of those things that you just couldn’t believe it that you kept having to go back and it has to be, the program is working. You just had to stick with your program.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. And I know one of the other things, you have a PMF machine?

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yes.

John Dowdy:                 Yep. In combination, and that’s what we try to do our best to educate people from our side, and all the Equinety product does a lot for your horse. It always helps to be in tune with your horse and know what they really need. But in combination with all of these different things, it is a dynamite product if I do say so myself.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yes, I would say that.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Yeah. But well that’s awesome. Well, as we wrap up here, is there anything else that you would like to touch on or any advice that you would have to give or maybe somebody that might be on the fence about trying the Equinety? Anything you’d have to say to them?

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well, I don’t really, I feel like they need to try it. I have truly never seen horses that look as good as they look. And I also know, we talked about this earlier, I make saddles for Bob and Marnie Loosenort. And so Marnie and them have used your product also. Well their horses are high performance horses. And I feel like if you’re starting to see a trend where multiple people and trainers are using the product, it’s probably good to try the product. We can all read about it, but until you try it, you can’t be a believer.

But I’m definitely a believer, so I feel like it’s definitely going to stay in my program because I can’t imagine my horses performing without it because I feel like as an athlete myself, we exercise hard and we train hard. We take amino acids too. And the recovery is just phenomenal and you’re not on it until you are on it. It’s kind of one of the things I feel like if it works for me, I got to try it on my horses and now I’ve seen it work on my horses. I feel like it’s just a win, win situation.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. That’s fantastic. Well, Cheyenne, I want to thank you so much for taking the time out. I know you’re very busy and it’s been a great call. I know there’s a lot of people that are going to get a lot out of this. Cheyenne Wimberley: from Stevenville, Texas, thank you so much.

Cheyenne Wimberley:   Thank you for having me.

John Dowdy:                 You bet. Bye bye.

 

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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  -   Cheyenne Wimberley - Ranked 14 in the world - NFR - High Performance Horses - Recovery - Stamina - Focus - Healthy and Happy Horses John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast.  <br /> <br />  <br /> Cheyenne Wimberley - Ranked 14 in the world - NFR - High Performance<br /> Horses - Recovery - Stamina - Focus - Healthy and Happy Horses<br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am so excited this week to have on Cheyenne Wimberley out of Stevenville, Texas. Cheyenne, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yes, thanks. Thanks for having me. We're ready to talk some Equinety today.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Well that's great. I'm excited to have you on and for those tuning in and thinking to yourself, hey, I know that name, Cheyenne Wimberley. That's right, she is ranked number 14 in the world. Going to the NFR, how does that make you feel?<br /> <br /> Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well, it's been hard to sink in but now it's getting exciting because it's been 20 years since I've been to the NFR, so it's exciting to actually be prepared to kind of try to get back to reality over there in Las Vegas.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Now, so 20 years. You were first at the NFR 97, 98. Tell us a little bit about that and your hiatus that you took.<br /> <br /> Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well, I had a really great horse back in 97 and 98 and then in 98 he had a career ending injury. And so I have taken a break. I went back to school and graduated and did some life things and I continued to train for charity horses and train my personal horses. But I didn't rodeo as much as I did. And so this past year has really been a change in reality of getting back on the road.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Speaking of that, being on the road, what was your favorite rodeo this year?<br /> <br /> Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well I think I would have to say Cheyenne, which is kind of ironic. But Cheyenne's in July and at that time I had been rodeoing all year, but I hadn't really pushed myself and I had three horses that I was riding at that time and I had only ran them a couple times a piece, trying to get with them. And then I ran the fastest time of the rodeo at Cheyenne. And so that was a big turning point at a really tough time of year. Because at that point you either need to keep going really hard or you need to go home. And so at that point it was like, oh, those horses were starting to really, we were starting to click, things were going good. And so that was really a turning point for my year.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yeah, so running the fastest time, then you're thinking, well hey, maybe there's a shot. We're just going to go all in on this thing and see what happens.<br /> <br /> Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yeah. At that point it was like, you know what? We're going to keep going. We're going to put our head down and see if we can grind it out a little bit. But that only starts the next month. That really was a grueling month. But when you're at this level, you either have to get all in or get all out. We decided to get all in at that point.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yeah, pretty much living well on the road 24/7.<br /> <br /> Cheyenne Wimberley:   Yes, living the dream.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 That's right. Absolutely. For those that are looking or that maybe this is a kind of a dream for them to reach this high level, what's the best advice well that you've been given? Just through the years in barrel racing and rodeo in general?<br /> <br /> Cheyenne Wimberley:   Well, I'd have to start, if I was getting into barrel racing from the start, I would make sure that my horsemanship skills were up to par. I think that the whole industry starts with horsemanship. Then it makes the rest of the learning a little bit easier. And then I would, there's tons of clinicians out there and I would pick a style that you like and I would stick with that style because it's easy to jump around. But then you never really master one and I would learn and just becom... John Dowdy clean 21:57
031 – Sommer Smith – Performance Horses THRIVE on Equinety – Skin Allergies – Muscle Tone – Recovery – Stamina – Shinier Coat https://www.teamequinety.com/031-sommer-smith-performance-horses-thrive-on-equinety-skin-allergies-muscle-tone-recovery-stamina-shinier-coat/ Wed, 02 Oct 2019 13:00:27 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1738     Sommer Smith - Performance Horses THRIVE on Equinety - Skin Allergies - Muscle Tone - Recovery - Stamina - Shinier Coat John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. This week we've got Sommer Smith out of Temecula, California, and this is probably ... well, it is a new one that we have not done before. This is going to focus around the English side of show horses and, well, we're going to talk about four this morning. So without further ado, Sommer, welcome to the Equinety Podcast. Sommer Smith:             Hi and thank you for having me. I'm excited to talk about your wonderful product and excited that we have something like this on the market for our equines and all their needs. John Dowdy:                 Awesome. Well, and I hear some foot clopping in the background. Might you be riding a horse right now? Sommer Smith:             Yes, I am currently on a horse. I'm here out riding out on the trails and trying to beat the heat in Southern California this year. John Dowdy:                 Awesome. Well, that's great. Okay, so you and your husband actually have race horses, but as you were telling me in the pre-call, you decided to use your for-show horses as a test batch to see how this stuff really works. Sommer Smith:             Correct. I originally purchased the product for one of my show horses as my test subject with the idea of using it on our race horses. The reason I decided to use it on my show horses first was I actually ride those horses versus the race horses that I do not. It gives me a better baseline of knowing the horse that I'm on and seeing how the product affects my horse when I can actually ride it myself. John Dowdy:                 No, that makes perfect sense. And for those of you who might be tuning in, who do have high performance horses that, you know, "Hey, the horses are doing great, why would I need this product?" This is a podcast for you. So, what the quality of the horses that you have prior to even trying the Equinety, what was the overall conditions of the horses just in general? Sommer Smith:             My horses are all in good health and show fit. The horse that I originally bought the product for, he had a minor strain that he sustained out playing out in the pasture. It was nothing major, but I was looking for something that might aid in the recovery so that I could get back to the show ring without missing too much of the season. So he became the inspiration of looking for something that would support healthy tissue growth and being able to return him to competition. John Dowdy:                 Sure. So let's talk about this first horse. He's an eight year old hunter? Sommer Smith:             Yes. He's quite a large horse. He's 17.1, about 1,400 pounds, so he's not a little guy. He was out playing in the pasture, kicked the fence, hooked the shoe in the fence and just had a minor strain behind. Wasn't anything major. The vet just give him a couple of weeks off and he could go back to working. I tend to be conservative with my horses and I had already planned to give him double the time off. It was fortunately not during competition season and I just wanted to get something to help support his healing, and that's when I found Equinety. John Dowdy:                 Sure. How long has this one been on product? Sommer Smith:             He's actually been on it now for four months. John Dowdy:                 Okay. And how's he doing now? Sommer Smith:             He's fantastic. We returned to the show ring, got some of the highest scores we've ever received. The trainer that I show with doesn't see my horse on a regular basis because he's out on the circuit all the time and I'm only out there part of the time, and he remarked about how wonderful the horse looks physically. And then when he rode him, he said, "This horse feels better than he's ever felt." John Dowdy:                 Wow.

 

 

Sommer Smith – Performance Horses THRIVE on Equinety –
Skin Allergies – Muscle Tone – Recovery – Stamina – Shinier Coat

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. This week we’ve got Sommer Smith out of Temecula, California, and this is probably … well, it is a new one that we have not done before. This is going to focus around the English side of show horses and, well, we’re going to talk about four this morning. So without further ado, Sommer, welcome to the Equinety Podcast.

Sommer Smith:             Hi and thank you for having me. I’m excited to talk about your wonderful product and excited that we have something like this on the market for our equines and all their needs.

John Dowdy:                 Awesome. Well, and I hear some foot clopping in the background. Might you be riding a horse right now?

Sommer Smith:             Yes, I am currently on a horse. I’m here out riding out on the trails and trying to beat the heat in Southern California this year.

John Dowdy:                 Awesome. Well, that’s great. Okay, so you and your husband actually have race horses, but as you were telling me in the pre-call, you decided to use your for-show horses as a test batch to see how this stuff really works.

Sommer Smith:             Correct. I originally purchased the product for one of my show horses as my test subject with the idea of using it on our race horses. The reason I decided to use it on my show horses first was I actually ride those horses versus the race horses that I do not. It gives me a better baseline of knowing the horse that I’m on and seeing how the product affects my horse when I can actually ride it myself.

John Dowdy:                 No, that makes perfect sense. And for those of you who might be tuning in, who do have high performance horses that, you know, “Hey, the horses are doing great, why would I need this product?” This is a podcast for you. So, what the quality of the horses that you have prior to even trying the Equinety, what was the overall conditions of the horses just in general?

Sommer Smith:             My horses are all in good health and show fit. The horse that I originally bought the product for, he had a minor strain that he sustained out playing out in the pasture. It was nothing major, but I was looking for something that might aid in the recovery so that I could get back to the show ring without missing too much of the season. So he became the inspiration of looking for something that would support healthy tissue growth and being able to return him to competition.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. So let’s talk about this first horse. He’s an eight year old hunter?

Sommer Smith:             Yes. He’s quite a large horse. He’s 17.1, about 1,400 pounds, so he’s not a little guy. He was out playing in the pasture, kicked the fence, hooked the shoe in the fence and just had a minor strain behind. Wasn’t anything major. The vet just give him a couple of weeks off and he could go back to working. I tend to be conservative with my horses and I had already planned to give him double the time off. It was fortunately not during competition season and I just wanted to get something to help support his healing, and that’s when I found Equinety.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. How long has this one been on product?

Sommer Smith:             He’s actually been on it now for four months.

John Dowdy:                 Okay. And how’s he doing now?

Sommer Smith:             He’s fantastic. We returned to the show ring, got some of the highest scores we’ve ever received. The trainer that I show with doesn’t see my horse on a regular basis because he’s out on the circuit all the time and I’m only out there part of the time, and he remarked about how wonderful the horse looks physically. And then when he rode him, he said, “This horse feels better than he’s ever felt.”

John Dowdy:                 Wow.

Sommer Smith:             So that was encouraging. I ride the horse daily and sometimes we don’t notice subtle changes in them, but when you get feedback from somebody who’s very trusted in the industry and has known the horse for two years and just keeps raving about how great the horse has returned, and it was very encouraging.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. And under saddle, how have you noticed just recovery and stamina and things of that nature, being a performance horse?

Sommer Smith:             My horse is … He tries very hard for me. I am an amateur. I make a lot of mistakes and sometimes I ask him for unusual feats of athleticism, which he’s more than happy to give me, but because of doing so, he does get tired. By the end of the horse show it’s all I can do to kind of keep him going as far as energy level, but on Equinety I don’t feel that at all. He’s the same day one as he is day four and that is simply amazing to me. Again, I’ve been showing this horse for two years and have struggled on the last day with stamina and no longer have that struggle.

John Dowdy:                 That’s incredible. Yeah. Okay, let’s go into horse number two, which is a four year old hunter as well that you just acquired from Europe?

Sommer Smith:             Correct.

John Dowdy:                 Yep, okay.

Sommer Smith:             We castrated him before shipping him over and that’s hard on a horse in general anyways, just the castration alone, but then getting on a flight and having to come to California and quarantine. He lost a lot of weight in the process. It’s a stressful thing for a young horse and weight loss is to be expected, but his was a little more than was anticipated. So we put him on Equinety right away and he just bloomed so quickly and was able to go to work after clearing quarantine. He picked up weight. It just was phenomenal on him. Sorry my horse is jumping forward at the moment.

John Dowdy:                 That’s okay. He’s getting excited.

Sommer Smith:             Yeah, yeah. Sorry about that.

John Dowdy:                 So you noticed the weight came back on quicker than expected, muscle tone.

Sommer Smith:             Muscle tone’s great. Another thing, when we castrate horses, their coats tend to get a little dull afterwards just with the loss of hormones, and his coat never went through that. And I have to credit Equinety with that. I’ve never had a horse castrated who didn’t have just a change in their hair coat, and this horse, if anything has changed, has been for the better.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. And as a side note, since you mentioned that, for those listening and for the first time, what the Equinety product is it’s 100% pure amino acids. There’s no fillers, no sugars, no starches, there’s no loading dose, and a serving size is 5.2 grams, which is not even a tablespoon. What it’s specifically formulated to do is stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body, and that’s what triggers all the hormones, specifically the hormones that help heal at a cellular level.

So, as we’re going through each of these horses and horse number one, the recovery was better, happier, comfortable, recovered very nice from that strain. Just the overall endurance and everything is better. In the second horse where you’re shipping across from Europe, significant weight loss, and just adding the Equinety helped with the weight gain, the muscle tone, the overall look and feel. And as you mentioned, didn’t lose the coat.

Sommer Smith:             [inaudible 00:07:47] of his coat.

John Dowdy:                 Correct, yes. So that gives a little bit of insight for what the product is and how it’s working and why it helps in so many different scenarios. So, let’s go into horse number three, which is a mare that’s a bit spicy and hot as you told me earlier, and is a jumper. Tell us about this one.

Sommer Smith:             Yeah, so horse number three is a high-level show horse. She competes at the meter 20 level. She’s just a hotter type mare. Doesn’t make her un-rideable by any means, but she’s spicy and I love her for that. She also takes very good care of me out there. I decided to try her on it because I wanted to find out if it made her hot or hotter and it does not at all. If anything, she a little bit happier on the product. She’s another one who tries her heart out for me and can get a little tired at the end of a horse show. Doesn’t really compromise her ability to do anything, but it makes me have to ride a little bit harder and putting her on Equinety, I don’t have that. Again, she’s the same the first day of the horse show as the last day of the horse show.

I recently had taken her to a series of horse shows and so we were at the show for two weeks, and prior to Equinety, it was a little harder the second week. But on Equinety, she’s again, she’s the same horse the first day of the show as the last day. And just the recovery on her is significant. I was so pleased that she feels so good on it all the time without getting hot or fresh.

John Dowdy:                 Yes, absolutely. Well, and as you mentioned before, your entire goal from the beginning was, hey, let’s test this on a few horses. Because your horses are already in great shape, but if you can help them be a little happier, a little healthier, and they’re doing things that are like a professional athlete. So they’re, you know, the stress and the strain and all those types of things. Let’s go into horse number four, which has only been on the product for how long?

Sommer Smith:             For a week.

John Dowdy:                 Okay. One week on the product, and what were the things going on with this horse that you thought, “Well, let’s try the product and see if this helps.”?

Sommer Smith:             His weight was a little light. I just bought the horse so I don’t really have any previous information on him. He kind of had some skin allergy issues where he was always itchy and scratchy. His coat was a little dull. He was rubbing his tail really bad. I had tried washing the tail and conditioning it and using topical products and nothing really seemed to alleviate the itchiness that he had. So I put him on Equinety, and low and behold, he stopped itching the very next day. He stopped rubbing his tail. It’s actually growing. People have remarked about how his coat color looks different. And again, he’s just thriving on it. I was shocked. I didn’t think I would see a difference in the horse in that short of a time. I’m so thrilled that he is comfortable, literally comfortable in his own skin now, and he’s just a happier horse.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, that’s great. Well, and one of the things … This product actually starts working in 24 hours. It stimulates the pituitary gland as soon as it’s absorbed, which is fairly quickly and starts working in 24 hours. We’ve seen in two to three days, horses that have a lot of stress and anxiety, just complete demeanor change. In this case, one week on product, it’s already benefited from the skin allergies and a better coat, which is quite remarkable in as little as one week. That’s something now. How big of a barn are you in?

Sommer Smith:             We have 70 horses on the farm. The hunter-jumper division has about 20 horses in it, and the rest are race horses or layup horses of various types. We do breeding and foaling. We start horses to go to the track. We do layups, retirements, you name it, we do it. I feel I can say from conception to cremation

John Dowdy:                 That would cover all basis for sure.

Sommer Smith:             Yes.

John Dowdy:                 Yep, yep. So, how would you say your horses look compared to other horses that are in there? Because again, this is a high-end barn where they get the best of things. How would you say yours compare just look-wise?

Sommer Smith:             So, my four horses that are on the product, their coats are very tight and shiny. The rest of the horses in the barn are actually starting to grow their winter coats, whereas mine have not yet. The only difference between the other horses and my four horses is Equinety.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Wow. That has to be encouraging for anyone tuning in, especially for the show horse crowd that if you find that your horses are doing fine, you don’t think that they need anything extra, maybe you should give the Equinety a try and just see how it works for your horse. A lot of people even use it as a preventative because it’s helping those cells operate at their optimal levels, so that’s always a plus. But if nothing else, for recovery, stamina. They haul better and all those types of things.

Well, I tell you what, Sommer, this I know is going to be very beneficial for the folks listening in. Is there anything else that you could think of that we haven’t talked about or maybe a piece of advice for anyone thinking about trying the product and maybe hadn’t pulled-

Sommer Smith:             Yeah. There’s lots of products out on the market, but there’s nothing that compares to Equinety for what you’re getting for your horse and cost-wise. It’s so much more cost-effective than I would say 98% of the products out there. But more than the cost, it works fantastic and it’s worth giving a shot.

John Dowdy:                 I couldn’t have said that better and I did not pay you for that comment. Just so …

Sommer Smith:             Well, it’s true. I mean, I tried it because, again, I own a lot of horses and so I do have to be conscious of what costs are. And I’m one of those you get what you pay for type, and you don’t want to cut corners. You want to get the best product you can, but when you have as many horses as I do, you do have to be conscious of how much you’re spending on a daily basis. And your product is not only remarkable of what it’s doing for my horses, it’s cost-effective to feed and that’s just amazing.

John Dowdy:                 Sure, absolutely. Well, Sommer, thank you so much. Sommer Smith from Temecula, California. Thanks again for sharing your stories on the Equinety Podcast.

Sommer Smith:             Well, thank you for having me on.

 

ORDER Equinety TODAY!

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  -   Sommer Smith - Performance Horses THRIVE on Equinety - Skin Allergies - Muscle Tone - Recovery - Stamina - Shinier Coat John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. This week we've got Sommer Smith out of Temecul...  <br /> <br />  <br /> Sommer Smith - Performance Horses THRIVE on Equinety -<br /> Skin Allergies - Muscle Tone - Recovery - Stamina - Shinier Coat<br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. This week we've got Sommer Smith out of Temecula, California, and this is probably ... well, it is a new one that we have not done before. This is going to focus around the English side of show horses and, well, we're going to talk about four this morning. So without further ado, Sommer, welcome to the Equinety Podcast.<br /> <br /> Sommer Smith:             Hi and thank you for having me. I'm excited to talk about your wonderful product and excited that we have something like this on the market for our equines and all their needs.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Awesome. Well, and I hear some foot clopping in the background. Might you be riding a horse right now?<br /> <br /> Sommer Smith:             Yes, I am currently on a horse. I'm here out riding out on the trails and trying to beat the heat in Southern California this year.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Awesome. Well, that's great. Okay, so you and your husband actually have race horses, but as you were telling me in the pre-call, you decided to use your for-show horses as a test batch to see how this stuff really works.<br /> <br /> Sommer Smith:             Correct. I originally purchased the product for one of my show horses as my test subject with the idea of using it on our race horses. The reason I decided to use it on my show horses first was I actually ride those horses versus the race horses that I do not. It gives me a better baseline of knowing the horse that I'm on and seeing how the product affects my horse when I can actually ride it myself.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 No, that makes perfect sense. And for those of you who might be tuning in, who do have high performance horses that, you know, "Hey, the horses are doing great, why would I need this product?" This is a podcast for you. So, what the quality of the horses that you have prior to even trying the Equinety, what was the overall conditions of the horses just in general?<br /> <br /> Sommer Smith:             My horses are all in good health and show fit. The horse that I originally bought the product for, he had a minor strain that he sustained out playing out in the pasture. It was nothing major, but I was looking for something that might aid in the recovery so that I could get back to the show ring without missing too much of the season. So he became the inspiration of looking for something that would support healthy tissue growth and being able to return him to competition.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Sure. So let's talk about this first horse. He's an eight year old hunter?<br /> <br /> Sommer Smith:             Yes. He's quite a large horse. He's 17.1, about 1,400 pounds, so he's not a little guy. He was out playing in the pasture, kicked the fence, hooked the shoe in the fence and just had a minor strain behind. Wasn't anything major. The vet just give him a couple of weeks off and he could go back to working. I tend to be conservative with my horses and I had already planned to give him double the time off. It was fortunately not during competition season and I just wanted to get something to help support his healing, and that's when I found Equinety.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Sure. How long has this one been on product?<br /> <br /> Sommer Smith:             He's actually been on it now for four months.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Okay. And how's he doing now?<br /> <br /> Sommer Smith:             He's fantastic. We returned to the show ring, got some of the highest scores we've ever received. The trainer that I show with doesn't see my horse on a regular basis because he's out on the circuit all the time and I'm only out there part of the time, John Dowdy clean 15:58
030 – Jessica Moore – Whiteline – Thrush – Collapsed heals – Navicular https://www.teamequinety.com/030-jessica-moore-whiteline-thrush-collapsed-heals-navicular/ Wed, 25 Sep 2019 13:00:32 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1736     Jessica Moore - Whiteline – Thrush – Collapsed heals – Navicular   John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am really excited this week to have on Jessica Moore out of Copperas Cove, Texas, and I'm telling you if you are dealing with any kind of hoof issues, this is the podcast to tune into. We're going to be talking about white line, thrush, collapsed heels, navicular, even getting into some arthritic issues. Without further ado, Jessica, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Jessica Moore:              Hi, thank you for having me. John Dowdy:                 Well, it's great to have you on. So let's get right into this. We're going to be talking about your 17-year-old rescue named Rooster. Tell us how you acquired Rooster and what was going on with him when you got him in. Jessica Moore:              Well, Rooster was offered up on Facebook as a free horse, and a lady was going through a divorce and she just needed him to go. She'd had him up for sale, couldn't sell him, and I told her that I would take him. I didn't hear from her for a little bit and then she messaged me and said, "If you're still want him, he's yours." I was like, "Let me hook up the trailer," and I head out to go pick him up. When she brought him to the trailer he was limping a little bit, but she was walking across rocks and he didn't have shoes on. And she's like, "He's just tender-footed." Okay. Not a big deal. We get him into the trailer and I take him back to my place. And then we started noticing that the limping was coming a little bit more and he was coming up more lame. Jessica Moore:              And so I started looking into maybe putting some boots on, that she said he was just tender-footed when it came to rocks. And I started looking at boots and the prices and which ones that he could say in a paddock 24/7 with, and I just decided before I go and spend all this money, let me have an X-ray because I know nothing of this horse. So I loaded him up and I took him down to my vet where we had X-rays done of his feet. And it came back he was diagnosed with moderate navicular disease. And so, she said she didn't know how severe because we didn't do an MRI, we just did X-rays. Jessica Moore:              And they did a a nerve block in him on the foot that was bothering him the worst. We later discovered that he had severe thrush. He had white line disease as well. He did have some arthritis. He was impaled in one of his shoulders by, I don't know what. But he's got a big gouge. So we put him on pain meds, brought him back. And he showed some improvement with the pain meds and with the nerve block. It still wasn't enough. I was soaking his feet in Oxine every other day, scrubbing his feet. We still weren't seeing a huge improvement from it and we decide to change his feed. We went to an extruded feed and started rationing out his hay. We did start to see some improvements after that. Jessica Moore:              The Equinety, the ad kept coming up, but I kept passing it because I was skeptical. I want to do the research. I want the numbers in front of me. I want to see results before I go and jump on this miracle stuff that's supposed to help. So I'm a little stubborn, but I kept reading and I came across this one on the Equinety site where it was a horse that was suffering from navicular. And I saw the results from it. And most people tell you that when they get the navicular disease that eventually it's a death sentence for them, and I wasn't going to give up on him. He may be 17 years old, but he's still got a lot of life left in him. John Dowdy:                 Sure. Jessica Moore:              Part of me just wanted to try it after reading so many different stories on Equinety's Facebook, just combing through. I didn't focus on just all the horses that had navicular, I wanted to see the results of all the horses from different aspects. So then I said, you know what?

 

 

Jessica Moore – Whiteline – Thrush – Collapsed heals – Navicular

 

John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am really excited this week to have on Jessica Moore out of Copperas Cove, Texas, and I’m telling you if you are dealing with any kind of hoof issues, this is the podcast to tune into. We’re going to be talking about white line, thrush, collapsed heels, navicular, even getting into some arthritic issues. Without further ado, Jessica, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Jessica Moore:              Hi, thank you for having me.

John Dowdy:                 Well, it’s great to have you on. So let’s get right into this. We’re going to be talking about your 17-year-old rescue named Rooster. Tell us how you acquired Rooster and what was going on with him when you got him in.

Jessica Moore:              Well, Rooster was offered up on Facebook as a free horse, and a lady was going through a divorce and she just needed him to go. She’d had him up for sale, couldn’t sell him, and I told her that I would take him. I didn’t hear from her for a little bit and then she messaged me and said, “If you’re still want him, he’s yours.” I was like, “Let me hook up the trailer,” and I head out to go pick him up. When she brought him to the trailer he was limping a little bit, but she was walking across rocks and he didn’t have shoes on. And she’s like, “He’s just tender-footed.” Okay. Not a big deal. We get him into the trailer and I take him back to my place. And then we started noticing that the limping was coming a little bit more and he was coming up more lame.

Jessica Moore:              And so I started looking into maybe putting some boots on, that she said he was just tender-footed when it came to rocks. And I started looking at boots and the prices and which ones that he could say in a paddock 24/7 with, and I just decided before I go and spend all this money, let me have an X-ray because I know nothing of this horse. So I loaded him up and I took him down to my vet where we had X-rays done of his feet. And it came back he was diagnosed with moderate navicular disease. And so, she said she didn’t know how severe because we didn’t do an MRI, we just did X-rays.

Jessica Moore:              And they did a a nerve block in him on the foot that was bothering him the worst. We later discovered that he had severe thrush. He had white line disease as well. He did have some arthritis. He was impaled in one of his shoulders by, I don’t know what. But he’s got a big gouge. So we put him on pain meds, brought him back. And he showed some improvement with the pain meds and with the nerve block. It still wasn’t enough. I was soaking his feet in Oxine every other day, scrubbing his feet. We still weren’t seeing a huge improvement from it and we decide to change his feed. We went to an extruded feed and started rationing out his hay. We did start to see some improvements after that.

Jessica Moore:              The Equinety, the ad kept coming up, but I kept passing it because I was skeptical. I want to do the research. I want the numbers in front of me. I want to see results before I go and jump on this miracle stuff that’s supposed to help. So I’m a little stubborn, but I kept reading and I came across this one on the Equinety site where it was a horse that was suffering from navicular. And I saw the results from it. And most people tell you that when they get the navicular disease that eventually it’s a death sentence for them, and I wasn’t going to give up on him. He may be 17 years old, but he’s still got a lot of life left in him.

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Jessica Moore:              Part of me just wanted to try it after reading so many different stories on Equinety’s Facebook, just combing through. I didn’t focus on just all the horses that had navicular, I wanted to see the results of all the horses from different aspects. So then I said, you know what? I’m going to go ahead and I’m going to give this a try. I didn’t tell anybody. I didn’t tell my farrier. I didn’t tell the vet. I didn’t tell anybody. I just wanted to try it and I kept it under wraps because if it didn’t work, nobody knew.

John Dowdy:                 Yes.

Jessica Moore:              If it did, then I’d be like, “Oh well, this is what I put him on.”

John Dowdy:                 Yep.

Jessica Moore:              I got the 15 day and then it offered me for the other 15 day and I was like, you know what? I’ll go ahead and do 30 days. I’m just going to try this for a full 30 days. We’ll see what kind of results that we get. So my farrier had just come out, trimmed up his hooves. I got pictures of the day that she came out and trimmed up his hooves, and that was right before we started this. I also took pictures after 30 days of him being on it of his hooves. She now has to come out and trim his hooves every three to four weeks because we’re doing corrective. But his hooves are growing so fast that she has to come out more often.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Now before we get into that, let’s go back to you ordered the product initially, or the first order for the 30 days, because you’re looking at doing the 30 day challenge. August 3rd is when you had placed the order and around August 13th you sent some initial pictures in. Now, one of the things that you had told me that Rooster had just excessive sweating. Tell us a little bit about that and what you found after just a few days of using Equinety what was going on. Because you had sent pictures in, without getting too graphic going on, but what was going on?

Jessica Moore:              Rooster, when I first brought him home, we live in Texas and we were having triple digit weather. We had more rain than usual and it was very humid. So when I would go out to feed him at 9:00, 10:00 in the morning, he would be drenched with sweat all down his neck, down his shoulders, running down his legs. It looked like you had pulled him out, put him in the round pen, worked him hard and then put him back up. At first I was like, okay, well maybe it’s the humidity, the heat. I kept looking around at the other horses that were around. I’m like, nobody else is sweating like this. So I started adding salt because I didn’t want him to dehydrate on me. I started adding the salt to his feed once a day.

Jessica Moore:              I got my Equinety in and then started adding that to the feed. A couple of days later I started noticing he was scouring. I would go out to his paddock and it was just cow patties. So I sent in a message and I was like, “What is going on? Why is this happening?” I was ready to pull it, take him off of it and just cut my losses on it. I get this message that there’s nothing in the product that would cause this.

Jessica Moore:              I go to start doing some research about everything that he’s in. I didn’t change his feed. He’s on an extruded feed. His hay is the same. He wasn’t eating anything other than that. With the research that I was doing, it showed that a massive amount of salt can cause issues as well. We pulled his salt and within a couple of days everything went back to normal. His stools went back to normal. I never changed how much I was giving of the Equinety. I never changed his feed, I never changed his hay. I just stopped putting the salt on top of his hay, on top of his feed. And then everything leveled back out.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. And with that being said, and every now and then we will receive messages like that. It’s like, “Oh, I started the Equinety and now this is now happening.” You know, something that’s not positive. And for those tuning in, and just like what I went back and forth with you in Messenger, there is absolutely nothing in the Equinety that has any negative side effects because it is 100% pure amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. So if you started the Equinety and there’s something weird going on, then just check and see what else you might have just added, like in this case. Because in our communications I didn’t know that you had added salt, but I wouldn’t know that you added salt. And you didn’t know because you were trying to fix the sweating aspect. So this is also why we recommend when you start the Equinety, don’t change anything else that you’re doing and just add the Equinety. That way you know it’s the only element.

John Dowdy:                 So in this case it just happened you started the salt and then few days later you started the Equinety. And fortunately through your research you found that, hey, the salt could be doing it. So when you took that away, then everything leveled itself out, which is perfect. So now we jump ahead 30 days later. And you had sent me some video, before and after, which you tagged the 30 day challenge. So what did you find? And of course, again, just to reiterate, you’re battling with a white line, thrush, collapsed heels, navicular, some arthritis. So let’s skip ahead 30 days and tell us what’s going on at the 30 day mark. And actually we’re a little bit beyond that, about seven weeks in, but what are you finding now?

Jessica Moore:              Well, now it was one day I was looking at Rooster and I realized it was early in the morning usually when he’s starting to pour sweat. And I looked at him and it just clicked. He’s not sweating. There’s not an ounce of sweat on him right now. He’s standing out here and he’s not sweating. His demeanor had changed. He’d always been an aggressive … When I first got him, he was extremely food aggressive. He tried to roll my mare several times, cut her up pretty bad and everything. And this was over a fence line. And after he’d finished his first 30 days of it, I noticed the sweating was gone, the attitude was gone. He was calmer. He wasn’t near as hyped up. He didn’t seem angry, irritated. He wasn’t acting like he was just starved.

Jessica Moore:              If anything got near, a human that’s different. You could go with his food, that’s fine, but any other animal couldn’t get near his food. His feet. I took a picture of his feet and sent it to my farrier and all she could send me was little hearts. She was so happy with his feet and how much they had improved in just the short amount of time that I had started it and between her last trimming and the next trimming that I had to do. And I had to bump it up because she was only going to come out every four to five weeks. She was now having to come out every three to four weeks because his feet are growing so fast.

John Dowdy:                 Right. And what did you find with with the frogs?

Jessica Moore:              His frogs are starting to shed out for the first time. The old damaged is shedding off in his new bright, beautiful frogs are coming in. He’s not near as tender- footed with them. The thrush has actually cleared out of three of his feet. We’re still working on one. It was the worst one of all of them, but it is about 85% improved. Almost. We’ve got our fingers crossed, we’re so close. The white line disease is clearing out. It’s growing out. We’ve got a little bit more to go on it, but when she came out, I showed her what product that I had started on and she was amazed by that and she’s curious to see what it’s going to do as we keep using it.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. Yep. And how about the collapsed heels?

Jessica Moore:              They’re growing out. He no longer looks like he’s got, she likes to refer to it as a butt crack. She’s like, “They’re growing out to where it looks more like a thumbprint now, the way that it’s supposed to.” He’s not near as tender-footed because he’s not landing near as much on his heels, he’s actually leveling out with them. You can press on his heels now where it was collapsed, where it used to be super, super tender and it’s not tender anymore.

John Dowdy:                 I tell you, it’s going to be really interesting over the next month to two months as we continue to see the progress in this. And on our website at teamequinety.com where we’re going to have this podcast uploaded, as well as on iTunes and several other places, but on our web site specifically, we’ll have this entire podcast transcribed and then we’ll have your video, your 30 day challenge video, as well as any other pictures that we can show before and after. And when you get an updated X-ray, if you decide to have one of those, we can put those up there as well so people can see.

John Dowdy:                 But I think this is very encouraging to people that are frustrated, that have tried all kinds of things, or that may be just be looking for something and might be as skeptical as you were, that they’ll go ahead and give this a try, the Equinety product. Because this isn’t our only story with things like this and we try to capture as many as we can and put it out there, so if you’re dealing with situation like this, maybe this can give you some hope. And we’ve just seen it time and time and time again. Well, is there anything else that you would like to add that we haven’t touched upon with Rooster?

Jessica Moore:              Well, the one thing, the biggest drastic notice in the differences is, is is the first video you never see Rooster get faster than his trot. Everything was too painful for him. That’s as fast as he would get. It didn’t matter how much you clicked at him, how much you had the lunge whip flying around. That was it. It hurt too much for him. The second video was about 30 days after I put him out there, and that was the first time that we’d ever seen him run or get into a lope. His previous owner had had him for three years and said she had never seen him do that.

John Dowdy:                 Wow.

Jessica Moore:              And that right there, just seeing that difference to where he’s actually moving, was well worth it.

John Dowdy:                 Sure.

Jessica Moore:              He wasn’t in near as much pain. His main had grown out. His tail is now dragging the ground and it’s just … He’s getting there. We do plan on having X-rays done again after being on this for about a year. We want to go and see how much of this has has changed. Whether it stayed the same, it’s gotten better, or it’s gotten worse, but we want to give this a full year while he’s on it to see how much this can change with that navicular disease.

John Dowdy:                 Sure. That will be very, very interesting. And also, I’ll throw in there, because you mentioned the growth of the main and the tail and demeanor and everything else that’s changing, and if you’re listening in for the first time and you’re wondering, okay, well how can one product, which is the Equinety Horse XL, and by the way, a serving size is 5.2 grams. This tiny little scoop that’s not even a tablespoon. And most people are like, “How in the world can this little tiny scoop do all this stuff?” Well, the amino acids are specifically formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland, which the pituitary gland is the master gland in the body and that’s what releases the necessary hormones, which then help heal at a cellular level. So we’re actually giving the horse what it needs to help heal itself from the inside out. And so it’s deciding where these repairs need to happen.

John Dowdy:                 In this case, it’s mainly around the hoof, but you’re also seeing the main and the tail. And I’m sure the coat is softer, shinier. Probably filling out a little bit more muscle-wise, but the attitude and demeanor is less stressed, not as nervous. And so, that affects everything in a horse. I mean, when you’re hurting then sometimes you feel cranky and all these other things. Same thing with the horse.

John Dowdy:                 Well, Jessica, I really, really appreciate you taking the time to share your story. And would you have anything else to say to anybody? I know you mentioned in the beginning when you kept seeing the ad you were very skeptical. What would you have to say to anybody that might be kind of in the same position, they’re seeing the ads wrote roll across all the time, thinking, hey, this is too good to be true. What would you have to tell them other than all the stuff that you’ve told them about the story to maybe get them to go ahead and try the 30 day challenge?

Jessica Moore:              With it, when you’re doing your research on it, trying to decide what product, because there are a lot of them out there and there’s so many to choose from, to do it. I would only go with ones that have many different testimonies with many different horses, where you can see the actual results from it. What do you have to lose? If you’re looking at a supplement to help your horse and you’re willing to do whatever it takes, and most of us are spending hundreds of dollars a month on our horses, especially ones that have issues, all you have to do is try this for 30 days.

Jessica Moore:              You’ll start to see the improvements in your horse. It may not be drastic. It may not be 100%. But you’ll start to see the differences in it in just that first 30 days. You can buy a 15 day supply and then they offer the other 15 day at half price, so it makes it a little bit easier on your wallet while you try it. I was already spending thousands of dollars a month on Rooster and I didn’t want him just to be a pasture puff that was going to be in pain. I was willing to try whatever, but I wanted to do my research and not just jump off and buy the first thing that I saw. And after doing the research, going to their Facebook, reading all their different testimonies, seeing all the different horses and the differences in them, I didn’t have anything to lose with him. And by trying it, Rooster has made a drastic change and I’ll keep him on it.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Now speaking of keeping him on it, tell us real quick what happened when you were getting close to the end of your 30 days and you had placed the order for the large tub, the $100 tub, which is 100 servings, but tell us what happened there as you started to run low. What was happening?

Jessica Moore:              So when I placed my order and I started to run low, I didn’t want Rooster to be without. I didn’t want to take a step back. So I started rationing it and I was giving him like half scoops, just because I wanted him to have some of it in his system. Because from my research, your body doesn’t store the amino acids, so each day, if you don’t use it than it’s eliminated out of the body. Our body doesn’t actually store that. So he needs it every single day. And I did, I started giving him half. His sweat started coming back, his irritability started coming back.

Jessica Moore:              And all I kept thinking was, if FedEx doesn’t hurry up and bring me my next bottle, I’m about to run out and the horse is going to take steps backwards. Not necessarily with the the white line or the thrush, but just his attitude, the sweats from the stress or being in pain, or for whatever reason. And then as soon as my package arrived, was the day I had run out. And so I did his full scoop. I gave it to him and within a couple of days everything started to go back to the way that it was. The sweats went away, his demeanor calmed back down with it. So I have to order at least ahead of time so I don’t run out again.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Well, and I’ll touch upon that too because you explained that very well about the amino acids. Now again, the amino acids, they’re in the Equinety because they’re specifically formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland to release the hormones. Now, the hormones that are released have a 23.5 Hour life cycle, so when you give the Equinety product for the very first time, it actually starts working right away. Once it’s absorbed, then it stimulates the pituitary to release the hormones. Now, those hormones have a 23.5 hour life cycle, so if you don’t give the product the next day, then the hormone levels just go back to the way that they were before you started.

John Dowdy:                 So you were starting to see that. You were only giving a half a scoop so it wasn’t stimulating at the full capacity. So if you’re giving the product for three years and never miss a day and then you stop, the hormone levels go back to the way they were three years ago, or at that particular age. So that’s why you were starting to see some regression with attitude, mood, because maybe some of the pain or chronic issues were starting to creep back in. And we hear this a lot, people sometimes they’ll even do a little test, they’ll keep their horse on for a while and they say, “Well, let me just stop giving this and see what happens.” And they’ll find that their horse will go back to the way that they were acting prior to. So just to a side note there. So for those listening in for the first time, that’s kind of how the product works internally.

John Dowdy:                 Well, Jessica, once again, I really appreciate you taking the time. I know this is going to be a very, very helpful podcast for people out there, and those that are dealing with all these types of issues, again, with white line, thrush, collapsed heels, navicular, some arthritis, rescue horse. So I know it will be very encouraging, so thank you very much for sharing your story.

Jessica Moore:              Oh, you’re welcome. Absolutely.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Okay, thank you. Bye bye.

Jessica Moore:              Thank you. Bye.

 

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  -   Jessica Moore - Whiteline – Thrush – Collapsed heals – Navicular   - John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am really excited this week to have on Jessica Moore out of Copperas Cove, Texas,  <br /> <br />  <br /> Jessica Moore - Whiteline – Thrush – Collapsed heals – Navicular<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Hello and welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am really excited this week to have on Jessica Moore out of Copperas Cove, Texas, and I'm telling you if you are dealing with any kind of hoof issues, this is the podcast to tune into. We're going to be talking about white line, thrush, collapsed heels, navicular, even getting into some arthritic issues. Without further ado, Jessica, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Jessica Moore:              Hi, thank you for having me.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Well, it's great to have you on. So let's get right into this. We're going to be talking about your 17-year-old rescue named Rooster. Tell us how you acquired Rooster and what was going on with him when you got him in.<br /> <br /> Jessica Moore:              Well, Rooster was offered up on Facebook as a free horse, and a lady was going through a divorce and she just needed him to go. She'd had him up for sale, couldn't sell him, and I told her that I would take him. I didn't hear from her for a little bit and then she messaged me and said, "If you're still want him, he's yours." I was like, "Let me hook up the trailer," and I head out to go pick him up. When she brought him to the trailer he was limping a little bit, but she was walking across rocks and he didn't have shoes on. And she's like, "He's just tender-footed." Okay. Not a big deal. We get him into the trailer and I take him back to my place. And then we started noticing that the limping was coming a little bit more and he was coming up more lame.<br /> <br /> Jessica Moore:              And so I started looking into maybe putting some boots on, that she said he was just tender-footed when it came to rocks. And I started looking at boots and the prices and which ones that he could say in a paddock 24/7 with, and I just decided before I go and spend all this money, let me have an X-ray because I know nothing of this horse. So I loaded him up and I took him down to my vet where we had X-rays done of his feet. And it came back he was diagnosed with moderate navicular disease. And so, she said she didn't know how severe because we didn't do an MRI, we just did X-rays.<br /> <br /> Jessica Moore:              And they did a a nerve block in him on the foot that was bothering him the worst. We later discovered that he had severe thrush. He had white line disease as well. He did have some arthritis. He was impaled in one of his shoulders by, I don't know what. But he's got a big gouge. So we put him on pain meds, brought him back. And he showed some improvement with the pain meds and with the nerve block. It still wasn't enough. I was soaking his feet in Oxine every other day, scrubbing his feet. We still weren't seeing a huge improvement from it and we decide to change his feed. We went to an extruded feed and started rationing out his hay. We did start to see some improvements after that.<br /> <br /> Jessica Moore:              The Equinety, the ad kept coming up, but I kept passing it because I was skeptical. I want to do the research. I want the numbers in front of me. I want to see results before I go and jump on this miracle stuff that's supposed to help. So I'm a little stubborn, but I kept reading and I came across this one on the Equinety site where it was a horse that was suffering from navicular. And I saw the results from it. And most people tell you that when they get the navicular disease that eventually it's a death sentence for them, and I wasn't going to give up on him. He may be 17 years old, but he's still got a lot of life left in him.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Sure.<br /> <br /> Jessica Moore:              Part of me just wanted to try it after reading so many different stories on Equinety's Facebook, just combing through. John Dowdy clean 25:54
029 – Rheanna Wolk – Abscesses, Faster Healing, Muscle Tone, Equinety put LIFE back into my horse https://www.teamequinety.com/029-rheanna-wolk-abscesses-faster-healing-muscle-tone-equinety-put-life-back-into-my-horse/ Wed, 18 Sep 2019 13:00:47 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1695   Rheanna Wolk – Abscesses, Faster Healing, Muscle Tone, Equinety put LIFE back into my horse John Dowdy:                 All right. Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. This week we're going to have Rheanna Wolk on from Missouri. Which by the way, for those of you who don't know Missouri, would be the Show-Me State and And Rheanna, let's just get right into this. Welcome to the show. Rheanna Wolk:             Oh. Thank you for having me. John Dowdy:                 Well, it's great to have you. And with Missouri being the Show-Me State, and I understand, and we'll get a little bit more into this with one of your horses that you have tried every supplement, or possible thing that could help your horses with abscesses. The Show-Me State definitely comes into play when you found the Equinety product. John Dowdy:                 So tell us a little bit about... you have two horses and you originally found the Equinety product for your Fox Trotter. Tell us what was going on with your Fox Trotter, and what you were trying to solve there and what happened there. Rheanna Wolk:             Okay. Yeah. When we would go out to take care of the horses, he would have major leg cramps in the one leg. And after seeing the ads, I thought, "Well, we should try this and see if it helps his cramping." He was on it for probably six weeks, and his cramps still were there, but he got really shiny. In the meantime, I thought I would try it for the other horse who has had many abscesses in the past, and thought I would use it as a preventative. John Dowdy:                 Right. So with your Fox Trotter, and this happens, I would say not that often, but because the Equinety is amino acids, and what it's specifically doing is stimulating the pituitary gland to release the necessary hormones, which help the body heal at a cellular level. So what you found with your Fox Trotter in over a six week week period, that he was still having the cramps. So it didn't help in that area specifically, but what you did find, his coat was soft and shiny. His overall build and everything was filled out and looked really good from that aspect. Rheanna Wolk:             Yes, yes. It really made him look very pretty, but he just didn't seem to recover from the cramping. John Dowdy:                 Okay. And at the same time, and then this is really going to be the meat of the story of this podcast, is your 29 year old who has had a plethora of issues through his life. So give us a little background on him. Because although this wasn't the initial reason why you purchased the product, you thought, "Well, what could it hurt? We'll give it a shot and see what happens." But tell us a little bit of the history and the issues that you've dealt with with him. Rheanna Wolk:             Oh yes. Several years ago he ended up getting an abscess, and the vet came to check him and he said he's just prone to these sort of infections, and things, and that I would be dealing with this a lot. So we tried so many different supplements, and different things that I found on the internet and in catalogs, and nothing ever seemed to work. So while my Fox Trotter was on this, I thought I would try the other one on Equinety. And he was getting really perky and acting a lot better. And I was noticing a huge difference with him. Unfortunately, I let my supplement run out. John Dowdy:                 What? Rheanna Wolk:             I let it go for a little bit, and in the meantime, I was in the process of reordering, but he developed another abscess. And when I... I'm sorry. John Dowdy:                 No, you're fine. Rheanna Wolk:             When I ended up getting the Equinety in the mail, I started giving him the supplement. And at that point his abscess had already showed itself. So usually it takes him two weeks to recover from an abscess, or more. He just is down for a very long time with this ailment.

 

Rheanna Wolk – Abscesses, Faster Healing,
Muscle Tone, Equinety put LIFE back into my horse

John Dowdy:                 All right. Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. This week we’re going to have Rheanna Wolk on from Missouri. Which by the way, for those of you who don’t know Missouri, would be the Show-Me State and And Rheanna, let’s just get right into this. Welcome to the show.

Rheanna Wolk:             Oh. Thank you for having me.

John Dowdy:                 Well, it’s great to have you. And with Missouri being the Show-Me State, and I understand, and we’ll get a little bit more into this with one of your horses that you have tried every supplement, or possible thing that could help your horses with abscesses. The Show-Me State definitely comes into play when you found the Equinety product.

John Dowdy:                 So tell us a little bit about… you have two horses and you originally found the Equinety product for your Fox Trotter. Tell us what was going on with your Fox Trotter, and what you were trying to solve there and what happened there.

Rheanna Wolk:             Okay. Yeah. When we would go out to take care of the horses, he would have major leg cramps in the one leg. And after seeing the ads, I thought, “Well, we should try this and see if it helps his cramping.” He was on it for probably six weeks, and his cramps still were there, but he got really shiny. In the meantime, I thought I would try it for the other horse who has had many abscesses in the past, and thought I would use it as a preventative.

John Dowdy:                 Right. So with your Fox Trotter, and this happens, I would say not that often, but because the Equinety is amino acids, and what it’s specifically doing is stimulating the pituitary gland to release the necessary hormones, which help the body heal at a cellular level. So what you found with your Fox Trotter in over a six week week period, that he was still having the cramps. So it didn’t help in that area specifically, but what you did find, his coat was soft and shiny. His overall build and everything was filled out and looked really good from that aspect.

Rheanna Wolk:             Yes, yes. It really made him look very pretty, but he just didn’t seem to recover from the cramping.

John Dowdy:                 Okay. And at the same time, and then this is really going to be the meat of the story of this podcast, is your 29 year old who has had a plethora of issues through his life. So give us a little background on him. Because although this wasn’t the initial reason why you purchased the product, you thought, “Well, what could it hurt? We’ll give it a shot and see what happens.” But tell us a little bit of the history and the issues that you’ve dealt with with him.

Rheanna Wolk:             Oh yes. Several years ago he ended up getting an abscess, and the vet came to check him and he said he’s just prone to these sort of infections, and things, and that I would be dealing with this a lot. So we tried so many different supplements, and different things that I found on the internet and in catalogs, and nothing ever seemed to work. So while my Fox Trotter was on this, I thought I would try the other one on Equinety. And he was getting really perky and acting a lot better. And I was noticing a huge difference with him. Unfortunately, I let my supplement run out.

John Dowdy:                 What?

Rheanna Wolk:             I let it go for a little bit, and in the meantime, I was in the process of reordering, but he developed another abscess. And when I… I’m sorry.

John Dowdy:                 No, you’re fine.

Rheanna Wolk:             When I ended up getting the Equinety in the mail, I started giving him the supplement. And at that point his abscess had already showed itself. So usually it takes him two weeks to recover from an abscess, or more. He just is down for a very long time with this ailment. And after starting him back on the supplement, after having the gap, he recovered in two days, which just completely blew my mind.

John Dowdy:                 Wow. So a healing time of a couple of weeks or more, down to two days?

Rheanna Wolk:             Yes.

John Dowdy:                 That’s quite miraculous.

Rheanna Wolk:             Yeah, it made me a true believer. Before I thought, “Well it’s at least making them shiny and soft”, but until then, this just proves that it does work.

John Dowdy:                 Right? Yeah. Because in dealing with abscesses, I know there’s a lot of people out there and that horses can be prone to this type of thing. And your horse is out of commission. And we’ve had a couple of their podcasts dealing with abscesses along with several other issues. And one of the reasons I was excited about this one is because this was one of the main things that you’ve been dealing with for quite some time. Not to mention the fact that he’s 29. And as you put it earlier, to me, he’s just kind of existing. So tell us about that. He is 29, so he’s not really interacting with the other horses or anything, just kind of is there.

Rheanna Wolk:             Right. Yeah. He just didn’t seem to have an interest in anything in life, or even sometimes eating his dinner. So when he started on this, he just started getting perkier. He started actually, if the other horses took off trotting up the field, he would join them. And I haven’t seen him trot in years. So this kind of gave him a entirely new recent life. So it’s been neat to watch him just transform under the supplement. And it hasn’t even been that long that he’s been on it. But I’m a believer and I’m going to keep him on it.

John Dowdy:                 Right. So he’s been on it now about four months. And now in addition to the abscesses and things like that, and although you haven’t had him tested, he has shown signs of Cushings. What are some of the other ailments and different things that he’s dealt with?

Rheanna Wolk:             Just loss of muscle tone. He’s had a lot of… in fact, every year we’ve had to almost shave him with his longer hair by spring time. And he’s just not progressing the way other horses in the field are progressing with him with throughout the year. But with this, he’s back to having shorter hair, he’s soft, he’s perky. He looks great.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. So living life again. That’s great.

Rheanna Wolk:             Yeah. I’m very impressed with it.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Now, when’s the last time he had an abscess?

Rheanna Wolk:             Let’s see. I’m thinking. When the one that developed… you mean the one before the one that I just treated him with the Equinety, or…?

John Dowdy:                 Well let me ask you this question. How often was he getting abscesses prior to Equinety, and then now that he’s been on Equinety?

Rheanna Wolk:             He would get roughly two a year. And it seemed like every spring and every fall something would happen. And I figured it was probably going to happen by spring time, and here I let Equinety drop of his supplements. And as soon as I do, and then of course he started to develop one. But I’m so glad that I was able to jump on that, and get it back on track. Because he just recovered from that so quickly.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, within two days. Well, I tell you, for those listening in for the first time, if you’re battling, trying to figure out maybe a possible solution for your horse that has abscesses. And again, we’ve got a couple other podcasts talking about this, you might want to give the Equinety a try, and take it from Brianna out of Missouri. The Show-Me State. A true believer now, would you say?

Rheanna Wolk:             Oh, absolutely, yes. This, this stuff has made a huge difference for all of us.

John Dowdy:                 Great. That’s fantastic. Well, Rheanna from Missouri. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your Equinety story, and please keep us updated.

Rheanna Wolk:             All right. Thank you.

John Dowdy:                 All right. Thank you. Bye. Bye.

Rheanna Wolk:             Bye.

 

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  Rheanna Wolk – Abscesses, Faster Healing, Muscle Tone, Equinety put LIFE back into my horse John Dowdy:                 All right. Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. This week we're going to have Rheanna Wolk on from Missouri.  <br /> <br /> <br /> Rheanna Wolk – Abscesses, Faster Healing,<br /> Muscle Tone, Equinety put LIFE back into my horse<br /> John Dowdy:                 All right. Hello and welcome to another Equinety Podcast. This week we're going to have Rheanna Wolk on from Missouri. Which by the way, for those of you who don't know Missouri, would be the Show-Me State and And Rheanna, let's just get right into this. Welcome to the show.<br /> <br /> Rheanna Wolk:             Oh. Thank you for having me.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Well, it's great to have you. And with Missouri being the Show-Me State, and I understand, and we'll get a little bit more into this with one of your horses that you have tried every supplement, or possible thing that could help your horses with abscesses. The Show-Me State definitely comes into play when you found the Equinety product.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 So tell us a little bit about... you have two horses and you originally found the Equinety product for your Fox Trotter. Tell us what was going on with your Fox Trotter, and what you were trying to solve there and what happened there.<br /> <br /> Rheanna Wolk:             Okay. Yeah. When we would go out to take care of the horses, he would have major leg cramps in the one leg. And after seeing the ads, I thought, "Well, we should try this and see if it helps his cramping." He was on it for probably six weeks, and his cramps still were there, but he got really shiny. In the meantime, I thought I would try it for the other horse who has had many abscesses in the past, and thought I would use it as a preventative.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Right. So with your Fox Trotter, and this happens, I would say not that often, but because the Equinety is amino acids, and what it's specifically doing is stimulating the pituitary gland to release the necessary hormones, which help the body heal at a cellular level. So what you found with your Fox Trotter in over a six week week period, that he was still having the cramps. So it didn't help in that area specifically, but what you did find, his coat was soft and shiny. His overall build and everything was filled out and looked really good from that aspect.<br /> <br /> Rheanna Wolk:             Yes, yes. It really made him look very pretty, but he just didn't seem to recover from the cramping.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Okay. And at the same time, and then this is really going to be the meat of the story of this podcast, is your 29 year old who has had a plethora of issues through his life. So give us a little background on him. Because although this wasn't the initial reason why you purchased the product, you thought, "Well, what could it hurt? We'll give it a shot and see what happens." But tell us a little bit of the history and the issues that you've dealt with with him.<br /> <br /> Rheanna Wolk:             Oh yes. Several years ago he ended up getting an abscess, and the vet came to check him and he said he's just prone to these sort of infections, and things, and that I would be dealing with this a lot. So we tried so many different supplements, and different things that I found on the internet and in catalogs, and nothing ever seemed to work. So while my Fox Trotter was on this, I thought I would try the other one on Equinety. And he was getting really perky and acting a lot better. And I was noticing a huge difference with him. Unfortunately, I let my supplement run out.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 What?<br /> <br /> Rheanna Wolk:             I let it go for a little bit, and in the meantime, I was in the process of reordering, but he developed another abscess. And when I... I'm sorry.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 No, you're fine.<br /> <br /> Rheanna Wolk:             When I ended up getting the Equinety in the mail, I started giving him the supplement. John Dowdy clean 9:39
028 – Linda Briles – Severe Laminitis for 6 years now Cantering – giving lessons and pain free https://www.teamequinety.com/028-linda-briles-severe-laminitis-for-6-years-now-cantering-giving-lessons-and-pain-free/ Wed, 11 Sep 2019 13:00:23 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1688     Linda Briles - Severe Laminitis for 6 years now Cantering - giving lessons and pain free!   John Dowdy:                 All right. Hello, welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am really excited. We've got Linda Briles on from Garden City, Kansas. Well, let's get right into it. Linda, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Linda Briles:                  Thank you so much. I'm so happy that you called, because I do want to share my experience with your product, Equinety, for a horse that really needed some help. John Dowdy:                 And I'm excited to have you on. Well, let's get to give a little bit of your background. You've been a riding instructor for 50 years. You're a pre-vet student. What are some of the other things that you've been involved with in the horse world? Linda Briles:                  Well, I showed when I was in high school All Western. When my daughter got into English, we did a lot of eventing, and got very involved with the United States Pony Club where I was the Vice RS of the Rocky Mountain Region and I was also on their instruction council in Kentucky for two years. We got into cutting, did a lot of cutting and I had 19 students and boarded when he horses. This was in Fort Collins, Colorado. Where I had gone to Colorado State University in pre-vet and I fold out a lot of mares for people. And so I have a lot of experience with horses and then have been following my daughter around the state of Kansas because of the grandchildren. And so I've ended up down here in Garden City with my horses. John Dowdy:                 Nice. And you're giving lessons now still? Linda Briles:                  Yeah. John Dowdy:                 Yeah. That's fantastic. Well that is quite a background. So you know your horses? Linda Briles:                  I do. John Dowdy:                 That goes without saying. So let's get into the meat of this particular podcast and one of the reasons I'm excited to have you on is because you have seven horses currently, but one of them is a 19 year old and you've been battling with severe laminitis for the past six years. Tell us a little bit about that and what are some of the things that you've been doing to try to help this situation? Linda Briles:                  Yeah. I probably didn't recognize what was going on at first, although six years or even seven years ago, he was urinating a lot and he would not want to lift one foot up and we just thought maybe he was out of shape, but he started lying down. He couldn't walk. He was gritting his teeth and we had the veterinarian, I was living in Topeka at that time, come out and said that he had laminitis. We tried changing his diet. It didn't seem to matter what we did. He would be up and down a lot and to the point where we couldn't use him as a, I used him as a schooling horse. He was a cutting horse in his younger years. And got down here to Garden City and most of the time he would be lying down. He would have lapses where he wouldn't be so bad. Maybe for a month or so. My farrier that I had during the first five years, pretty well gave up on him and told me that I should probably put him down and I didn't feel that I could. And I saw this advertisement on Facebook for Equinety and I thought I'm going to give it a try. And I had tried tumeric because I've seen a lot of results with my horses when they've started to colic or have some problems. The tumeric has really worked really well, but it's an antiinflammatory painkiller. And so it didn't really solve the problem until I started using the Equinety, which I noticed. This horse was lying down, gritting his teeth. I had to make him get up to walk out, to go out into a crowd during the day. Within three days, I noticed it when morning I walked in, he was standing up. That was a good sign and less urine. Within a week he was walking out to his corral, still very carefully. And then there was an interim where I didn't have a farri...

 

 

Linda Briles – Severe Laminitis for 6 years
now Cantering – giving lessons and pain free!

 

John Dowdy:                 All right. Hello, welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am really excited. We’ve got Linda Briles on from Garden City, Kansas. Well, let’s get right into it. Linda, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Linda Briles:                  Thank you so much. I’m so happy that you called, because I do want to share my experience with your product, Equinety, for a horse that really needed some help.

John Dowdy:                 And I’m excited to have you on. Well, let’s get to give a little bit of your background. You’ve been a riding instructor for 50 years. You’re a pre-vet student. What are some of the other things that you’ve been involved with in the horse world?

Linda Briles:                  Well, I showed when I was in high school All Western. When my daughter got into English, we did a lot of eventing, and got very involved with the United States Pony Club where I was the Vice RS of the Rocky Mountain Region and I was also on their instruction council in Kentucky for two years. We got into cutting, did a lot of cutting and I had 19 students and boarded when he horses. This was in Fort Collins, Colorado. Where I had gone to Colorado State University in pre-vet and I fold out a lot of mares for people. And so I have a lot of experience with horses and then have been following my daughter around the state of Kansas because of the grandchildren. And so I’ve ended up down here in Garden City with my horses.

John Dowdy:                 Nice. And you’re giving lessons now still?

Linda Briles:                  Yeah.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. That’s fantastic. Well that is quite a background. So you know your horses?

Linda Briles:                  I do.

John Dowdy:                 That goes without saying. So let’s get into the meat of this particular podcast and one of the reasons I’m excited to have you on is because you have seven horses currently, but one of them is a 19 year old and you’ve been battling with severe laminitis for the past six years. Tell us a little bit about that and what are some of the things that you’ve been doing to try to help this situation?

Linda Briles:                  Yeah. I probably didn’t recognize what was going on at first, although six years or even seven years ago, he was urinating a lot and he would not want to lift one foot up and we just thought maybe he was out of shape, but he started lying down. He couldn’t walk. He was gritting his teeth and we had the veterinarian, I was living in Topeka at that time, come out and said that he had laminitis. We tried changing his diet. It didn’t seem to matter what we did. He would be up and down a lot and to the point where we couldn’t use him as a, I used him as a schooling horse. He was a cutting horse in his younger years. And got down here to Garden City and most of the time he would be lying down. He would have lapses where he wouldn’t be so bad. Maybe for a month or so.

My farrier that I had during the first five years, pretty well gave up on him and told me that I should probably put him down and I didn’t feel that I could. And I saw this advertisement on Facebook for Equinety and I thought I’m going to give it a try. And I had tried tumeric because I’ve seen a lot of results with my horses when they’ve started to colic or have some problems. The tumeric has really worked really well, but it’s an antiinflammatory painkiller. And so it didn’t really solve the problem until I started using the Equinety, which I noticed. This horse was lying down, gritting his teeth. I had to make him get up to walk out, to go out into a crowd during the day. Within three days, I noticed it when morning I walked in, he was standing up.

That was a good sign and less urine. Within a week he was walking out to his corral, still very carefully. And then there was an interim where I didn’t have a farrier, but I found a really good one. Showed him the book of how I wanted his hooves redone and the angles. And so the first time that he did his hooves, we put them with pads and did the correct angle, took the toe off and it was hard for him to hold his feet up very long. The next time he came out, six weeks later, now this is when he’s been on the Equinety, he could not believe the difference. And now the horse is cantering in the pasture. He keeps company with a horse that’s almost 40 that just lost his eyesight. And I’ve actually put him on it, I’m hoping for some crazy miracle. But this horse doesn’t urinate like he used to. I never seen him lie down. He’s not in pain. And I just started giving him his first lesson last week.

John Dowdy:                 Holy smokes.

Linda Briles:                  I’m thrilled.

John Dowdy:                 Wow. That is an amazing story. Absolutely amazing.

Linda Briles:                  Yeah. And it’s not a placebo. A horse doesn’t know it’s a placebo because it really … And now I have seven horses. I’ve put them all on it. I mean some there’s no symptoms, but I’m just thinking, I don’t think it could hurt him.

John Dowdy:                 Now with you being in the horse industry for as long as you have, I’m sure you have seen a lot of things on the market. I’m sure you’ve tried a lot of different things through the years. And when you ran into the Equinety and of course you were at a point where you didn’t know what else to do and of course your farrier at the time was at his wits end and you just telling you well you should just put the horse down because he doesn’t have any answers.

Linda Briles:                  Exactly.

John Dowdy:                 So with all the things that you’ve seen, and I’m sure there’s some great things out there that work absolutely fantastic, but when you compare your history with horses and the different things that you’ve tried, and then you see the results with the Equinety. What was your immediate reaction to what you were seeing?

Linda Briles:                  I just thank God that I found this on, I mean I think it was meant to be for me to see this on Facebook when I was being told that I should put this horse down and it’s just amazing. It’s just wonderful. It is just wonderful.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah, I tell you we are definitely blessed as a company. We had no idea it was going to take off like this in the horse industry and I encourage anybody that is dealing with a situation and maybe you’ve tried everything under the sun, just give this product to try because you never know the odds of it working are, I will say on the high side. As a matter of fact, over a six month period we’ve had a least that I know of from phone calls, emails, messages coming through on Facebook, 50 plus people that we’re dealing with a mystery lameness. And of course in your scenario we’re dealing with severe laminitis. But in these scenarios it was just a mystery lameness. Nobody had any idea what was going on.

And as a matter of fact, I’ll tell you a quick story for those listening in. About a month ago, there was a lady that called in, it was a Monday or Tuesday and she says, “Listen, I’ve been dealing with this mystery lameness for a long time. I’ve got the vet coming out on Friday to put this horse down because we don’t know what else to do. We’ve tried everything else. And I came across your product and just wanted to know if you thought it would help.” And I said, “Well, we don’t know until we try. Would you be okay with putting that appointment off?” And she goes, “Yeah, sure, I’ll put that off.”

So she calls me about a month later, which was just a week and a half ago, and she goes, “Hey, I just wanted to give you an update.” She goes, “The grave was dug. It’s all roped off. Now my horse is not 100% but she’s doing so much better that I would never dream of putting this horse down.” And these are the types of stories that we hear all the time. When you told me this story about yours and dealing with specifically with the laminitis, it’s like, oh my gosh, now we’ll go with all the things that he’s been through. And now given the first riding lesson just last week, that’s wild.

Linda Briles:                  It is. I mean, I just can’t believe it. It’s just, it’s a miracle to me. It really is. Yep. He’ll be on it the rest of his life.

John Dowdy:                 That’s great.

Linda Briles:                  Yeah. It’s wonderful. Thank you so much.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Well, I can’t take all the credit. That for sure. I wasn’t the brains behind putting it all together, but for anybody that’s listening into this podcast for the first time, that still might be on the fence a little bit. That might think, okay, well this is too good to be true. What advice or what would you have to tell them that might bring them over to just give it a try?

Linda Briles:                  Well, I just think you have to have a gut instinct of whether, I mean, I don’t know why when I read about it, I just thought this has got to be it. And you know within three days. I mean I did with this, I mean this horse, I have pictures of him lying down where he’s just absolutely gritting his teeth, he’s in so much pain. I mean it was horrible and off and on over these last six years. There’s nothing. It’s gone. So I mean I can send pictures if somebody wants to see pictures. I’ve got pictures of him.

John Dowdy:                 Yeah.

Linda Briles:                  And so I don’t know how else to I, it’s just a fabulous product. You should try it. Why not?

John Dowdy:                 Yeah. Well actually if you’ll email those pictures over then what we’ll do is below the podcast on the team Equinety.com website, where this podcast will be posted. It will also be transcribed, but we’ll put some pictures, a video, if you have any video. We’ll put that below there so we can take a look. I would suggest pictures are best, because one of the previous podcasts, our guests did not have a way to take pictures. So she actually described her horse to me. So I told her I was going to draw an image and let’s just say I should not take up the world of art. So yeah, it was kind of humorous. But anyways, yeah. So send those over. We’ll post those for everybody can take a look. And Linda, thank you so much. Linda Briles from Garden City, Kansas. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your Equinety story.

Linda Briles:                  It’s worth it. If it’s going to help somebody else’s horse, I hope. I hope they’ll try it.

John Dowdy:                 Awesome. Well thank you so much.

Linda Briles:                  Okay.

John Dowdy:                 All right. Bye bye.

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  -   Linda Briles - Severe Laminitis for 6 years now Cantering - giving lessons and pain free!   - John Dowdy:                 All right. Hello, welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am really excited.  <br /> <br />  <br /> Linda Briles - Severe Laminitis for 6 years<br /> now Cantering - giving lessons and pain free!<br />  <br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 All right. Hello, welcome to another Equinety podcast. I am really excited. We've got Linda Briles on from Garden City, Kansas. Well, let's get right into it. Linda, welcome to the Equinety podcast.<br /> <br /> Linda Briles:                  Thank you so much. I'm so happy that you called, because I do want to share my experience with your product, Equinety, for a horse that really needed some help.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 And I'm excited to have you on. Well, let's get to give a little bit of your background. You've been a riding instructor for 50 years. You're a pre-vet student. What are some of the other things that you've been involved with in the horse world?<br /> <br /> Linda Briles:                  Well, I showed when I was in high school All Western. When my daughter got into English, we did a lot of eventing, and got very involved with the United States Pony Club where I was the Vice RS of the Rocky Mountain Region and I was also on their instruction council in Kentucky for two years. We got into cutting, did a lot of cutting and I had 19 students and boarded when he horses. This was in Fort Collins, Colorado. Where I had gone to Colorado State University in pre-vet and I fold out a lot of mares for people. And so I have a lot of experience with horses and then have been following my daughter around the state of Kansas because of the grandchildren. And so I've ended up down here in Garden City with my horses.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Nice. And you're giving lessons now still?<br /> <br /> Linda Briles:                  Yeah.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 Yeah. That's fantastic. Well that is quite a background. So you know your horses?<br /> <br /> Linda Briles:                  I do.<br /> <br /> John Dowdy:                 That goes without saying. So let's get into the meat of this particular podcast and one of the reasons I'm excited to have you on is because you have seven horses currently, but one of them is a 19 year old and you've been battling with severe laminitis for the past six years. Tell us a little bit about that and what are some of the things that you've been doing to try to help this situation?<br /> <br /> Linda Briles:                  Yeah. I probably didn't recognize what was going on at first, although six years or even seven years ago, he was urinating a lot and he would not want to lift one foot up and we just thought maybe he was out of shape, but he started lying down. He couldn't walk. He was gritting his teeth and we had the veterinarian, I was living in Topeka at that time, come out and said that he had laminitis. We tried changing his diet. It didn't seem to matter what we did. He would be up and down a lot and to the point where we couldn't use him as a, I used him as a schooling horse. He was a cutting horse in his younger years. And got down here to Garden City and most of the time he would be lying down. He would have lapses where he wouldn't be so bad. Maybe for a month or so.<br /> <br /> My farrier that I had during the first five years, pretty well gave up on him and told me that I should probably put him down and I didn't feel that I could. And I saw this advertisement on Facebook for Equinety and I thought I'm going to give it a try. And I had tried tumeric because I've seen a lot of results with my horses when they've started to colic or have some problems. The tumeric has really worked really well, but it's an antiinflammatory painkiller. And so it didn't really solve the problem until I started using the Equinety, which I noticed. This horse was lying down, gritting his teeth. I had to make him get up to walk out, to go out into a crowd during the day. Within three days, I noticed it when morning I walked in, he was standing up. John Dowdy clean 12:43
027 – Rachel Senft – Fewer Injections, Recovery, Muscle Mass, Topline, Healthier Coat, Anxiety – Nervous, Stronger Hooves https://www.teamequinety.com/027-rachel-senft-fewer-injections-recovery-muscle-mass-topline-healthier-coat-anxiety-nervous-stronger-hooves/ Wed, 04 Sep 2019 13:00:37 +0000 https://www.teamequinety.com/?p=1685     027 - Rachel Senft - Fewer Injections, Recovery, Muscle Mass, Topline, Healthier Coat, Anxiety - Nervous, Stronger Hooves       John Dowdy:     Hello, and welcome to another Equinety podcast. This is your host, John Dowdy. This week, we're swinging up into Ohio. Our guest is Rachel Senft. She is a nurse for her day job and on the weekends typically running about three shows a month. Rachel, welcome to the Equinety podcast. Rachel Senft:    Thanks for having me. I am really excited to tell the story about how it's helped all my horses, especially my oldest gelding. John Dowdy:     Oh, that's awesome. Well, we're excited to have you on. Today we're going to be talking about four of your different horses. But before we do that, as I mentioned, you are a nurse. When you first saw the product, the Equinety product, and saw that it was all amino acids, what went through your head as you're looking for things for your horses and things like that? Rachel Senft:    I was looking for something a little bit different than your traditional joint supplements, like your feed through stuff. There's some debate whether they're effective or not. We all know like the Adequan injections and stuff are super expensive. So I wanted to try something different to see if it really helped [inaudible 00:01:17]. Rachel Senft:    That's kind of how I got started on Equinety. A friend of mine had used it, and my older horse just wasn't looking very good. We were pumping the feed to him. I think I started him on it like around January. We were pumping the feed to him. He was kind of dull coated. He wasn't keeping a whole lot of weight. So we ended up putting him on Equinety and within a week noticed a big difference than him. He was always typically kind of hollowed out through the withers. That muscle mass increased, his coat got brighter, he just overall looked like a whole different horse, and that was only in like a matter of a week. By the end of the 30 day sample, he looked amazing. He was 15 then, he's 17 now. When people see him, they can't believe he's 17. He doesn't look it [inaudible 00:02:27]. John Dowdy:     Wow. That's great. Now you're using this horse as well as your other ones in the barrel racing world. You qualified for several things in the NBHA and the IBRA primarily where you're running. Give us a little bit of some of your accomplishments there. Rachel Senft:    In 2017, I guess my biggest accomplishment would be I won my first saddles on my older horse. I ended up reserve ... state champion, and I was reserve state champion on the second horse that I trained by only like a couple points. So I was super excited. We had never won a saddle. I've gotten plenty of buckles, but that saddle was really, really a check off my bucket list. John Dowdy:     So two of the horses that you trained, you won champion and reserve on both of them. Rachel Senft:    Yup. John Dowdy:     That's great. Rachel Senft:    That champion reserve in the 3D and in our state, it's pretty salty. I'm running against [inaudible 00:03:39], all those guys. So it's not a walk in the park, per se. John Dowdy:     Right, wow. And you train all of your horses? Rachel Senft:    Yeah, we typically buy two-year-olds, and some of them aren't even broke, and we start them on our own. We trail ride them until they're about four or five-ish, just to get their heads mature. Then we take them and I start kind of playing with them and teaching them the barrel pattern. So by doing that, we create sound ... like they're structurally sound by the time they're four or five, they've got good heads on their shoulders, and through trail ridings and do different things, they usually are pretty good with their feet. John Dowdy:     Right. Yeah, so even with the intense training and the long hours and weeks and months that it takes to get these horses where they need to be, you still were finding that prior to using the Equinety,

 

 

027 – Rachel Senft – Fewer Injections, Recovery, Muscle Mass,

Topline, Healthier Coat, Anxiety – Nervous, Stronger Hooves

 

 

 

John Dowdy:     Hello, and welcome to another Equinety podcast. This is your host, John Dowdy. This week, we’re swinging up into Ohio. Our guest is Rachel Senft. She is a nurse for her day job and on the weekends typically running about three shows a month. Rachel, welcome to the Equinety podcast.

Rachel Senft:    Thanks for having me. I am really excited to tell the story about how it’s helped all my horses, especially my oldest gelding.

John Dowdy:     Oh, that’s awesome. Well, we’re excited to have you on. Today we’re going to be talking about four of your different horses. But before we do that, as I mentioned, you are a nurse. When you first saw the product, the Equinety product, and saw that it was all amino acids, what went through your head as you’re looking for things for your horses and things like that?

Rachel Senft:    I was looking for something a little bit different than your traditional joint supplements, like your feed through stuff. There’s some debate whether they’re effective or not. We all know like the Adequan injections and stuff are super expensive. So I wanted to try something different to see if it really helped [inaudible 00:01:17].

Rachel Senft:    That’s kind of how I got started on Equinety. A friend of mine had used it, and my older horse just wasn’t looking very good. We were pumping the feed to him. I think I started him on it like around January. We were pumping the feed to him. He was kind of dull coated. He wasn’t keeping a whole lot of weight. So we ended up putting him on Equinety and within a week noticed a big difference than him. He was always typically kind of hollowed out through the withers. That muscle mass increased, his coat got brighter, he just overall looked like a whole different horse, and that was only in like a matter of a week. By the end of the 30 day sample, he looked amazing. He was 15 then, he’s 17 now. When people see him, they can’t believe he’s 17. He doesn’t look it [inaudible 00:02:27].

John Dowdy:     Wow. That’s great. Now you’re using this horse as well as your other ones in the barrel racing world. You qualified for several things in the NBHA and the IBRA primarily where you’re running. Give us a little bit of some of your accomplishments there.

Rachel Senft:    In 2017, I guess my biggest accomplishment would be I won my first saddles on my older horse. I ended up reserve … state champion, and I was reserve state champion on the second horse that I trained by only like a couple points. So I was super excited. We had never won a saddle. I’ve gotten plenty of buckles, but that saddle was really, really a check off my bucket list.

John Dowdy:     So two of the horses that you trained, you won champion and reserve on both of them.

Rachel Senft:    Yup.

John Dowdy:     That’s great.

Rachel Senft:    That champion reserve in the 3D and in our state, it’s pretty salty. I’m running against [inaudible 00:03:39], all those guys. So it’s not a walk in the park, per se.

John Dowdy:     Right, wow. And you train all of your horses?

Rachel Senft:    Yeah, we typically buy two-year-olds, and some of them aren’t even broke, and we start them on our own. We trail ride them until they’re about four or five-ish, just to get their heads mature. Then we take them and I start kind of playing with them and teaching them the barrel pattern. So by doing that, we create sound … like they’re structurally sound by the time they’re four or five, they’ve got good heads on their shoulders, and through trail ridings and do different things, they usually are pretty good with their feet.

John Dowdy:     Right. Yeah, so even with the intense training and the long hours and weeks and months that it takes to get these horses where they need to be, you still were finding that prior to using the Equinety, sometimes they just maybe weren’t filled out completely, or they look kind of dull, or there were some issues.

Rachel Senft:    Especially towards the end of the summer after running several shows … you know, there’s a lot of three day shows up here. Especially my older horse, he would actually get anemic. His hair coat would look dull, his eyes were dull, he just wouldn’t fire. Since I’ve been using Equinety, I haven’t had to do anything to build his blood back up or anything like that. We’ve leveled off on the amount of feed he gets, so we haven’t had to increase or decrease what he gets fed, which is really nice, because he just getting fed a lot [crosstalk 00:05:41] his weight.

Rachel Senft:    Hauling and going several separate times a month, sometimes it can kind of stress him out. I have a horse that’s a little bit more nervous. At times he can be kind of hot. Putting Jake on the Equinety has seemed like it’s leveled out his temperament. He’s very easy to get along with anymore. Not that he was hard to begin with, but he’s just easier all around. He doesn’t seem to get so stressed at the shows. You can pull in multiple weekends in a row and he’s good with it.

John Dowdy:     Right. So I know from our standpoint, there’s a few shows that we go to, and probably one of the most things that we hear the feedback is with a nervous horse or one that has a lot of anxiety. We’ve heard in as little as two to three days of being on the Equinety how much it’s really just calming the horse down, just kind of takes the edge off and it. Maybe you can answer this, but from what we’ve heard, it doesn’t take off … I mean, they still want to do their job. They’re still very, very focused. It just seems it kind of takes the edge off and they’re just comfortable in their skin now. Is that what you would find?

Rachel Senft:    Yeah, I mean it really seems kind of like he would think too much, and it really kind of got his wheels between his ears to slow down, and he became more focused. He wouldn’t get himself so hot at the gate that he’d blow a pattern or anything like that. He wasn’t hard to get in the arena before, but he is a lot calmer when you’re trying to get in the arena now. I’ve noticed a big difference as far as that goes with him. He still eats. He’ll eat now on the three days shows. Before, he’d kind of go on and off his grain, he’d get super grumpy. He doesn’t have any of those issues or anymore.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, fantastic. Now this one also had some hoof issues going on as well.

Rachel Senft:    Yeah, he’s got the famous [inaudible 00:07:57] horse, white feet. We were kind of dealing with some foot issues. He had stuck his foot into something, and it looked like he literally [inaudible 00:08:09] part of it off. So we were having a hard time getting enough foot to grow to put a shoe back on him. I’ve noticed since he’s been on the Equinety, we don’t have that problem at all anymore.

John Dowdy:     Yeah. The hoof growth is probably one of the other things that we hear most often. That takes a little bit longer. I mean, although we’ve received a lot of feedback in as little as four to six weeks, you’ll start seeing some nice hoof growth depending on the situation, but that’s pretty amazing.

John Dowdy:     So let’s get into your horse number three here, the red Roan. Tell us a little bit about this one and what was going on.

Rachel Senft:    She didn’t look bad, but she didn’t look as good as what she could. She didn’t have that real soft hair coat or a real good shine to her coat. So we put her on it as well and it’s dramatically changed like her appearance. She’s super soft, and she’s got this real pretty silvery burgundy coat on her now. She kind of in the winters, if she wasn’t getting rode a lot, she would go off of her grain and lose some weight. Even when she goes off of her grain, she almost gets depressed when you don’t ride her. Even when she goes off of her grain, she’s holding her weight a little bit better.

John Dowdy:     Nice, nice.

Rachel Senft:    That’s the biggest difference I’ve seen in the red Roan.

John Dowdy:     Yeah, yeah. When all those little things … We have a lot of people that they have a horse that’s in really great shape, there’s nothing really wrong with them, per se, but the great thing with the Equinety is it seems to kick them up a couple of notches. And because of what it’s doing, and I’ll get a little bit more into this after we talk about your young horse here, but ultimately it’s helping balance the body from the inside out. That’s why it has all of these effects. But I’ll get a little bit more into that before … before we do that, I’ll talk about your young horse here. What was going on with this one?

Rachel Senft:    I bought him as a three year old. He didn’t look bad, but he didn’t look as good as he could. I guess I’m kind of picky about how my horses look, because if they don’t look good, more than likely they’re not going to perform good for you, especially a young one that’s learning. You don’t want them to get sore, you want to help them as much as you can, especially in their growth stages.

Rachel Senft:    I’ve found with him … He’s been on it almost a year now. I bought him last October. Even in his growth stages where he gets all awkward, where his hip is higher than his withers, they tend to lose some weight. He hasn’t, he’s maintained. He’s kicked out 24/7, so he’s kind of sun bleached. He looked … a sun bleached horse, they’re not very shiny, they’re not very soft, but he is super shiny even though he’s pretty sun bleached from being out all day long. That’s the biggest difference I’ve noticed that I’ve noticed in him, just his hair coat despite being outside all the time, and then he’s not losing weight when he’s in those awkward, gangly coat stages, but he kind of looks like a mature gelding.

John Dowdy:     All right. Wow. Yup, that is great. Well, I will just take a quick minute here to get into a little bit of what this Equinety stuff is. If it’s your first time tuning in and you’ve heard these stories about four horses with, in this particular case, kind of four different issues going on, and how does this stuff help and all these scenarios.

John Dowdy:     First of all, the Equinety is 100% pure amino acids and there is no fillers, no sugars, no starches, and there’s no loading dose. A serving size is 5.2 grams, which is not quite a tablespoon. Just use it as a top dressing and it’s very palatable. Amino acids are typically salty by nature. So in the case that one of them snubs their nose at it, you can mix it with a little coconut oil or applesauce or syringe it. But it’s not a long term thing, they’ll typically just eat it right up.

John Dowdy:     But what’s unique about the Equinety product is the amino acids are specifically formulated to stimulate the pituitary gland, which is the master gland in the body. That’s what releases the necessary hormones that help heal at a cellular level.

John Dowdy:     So as Rachel mentioned earlier in the call, when she was sold a product and was specifically looking to possibly replace some things or see how this would compare to maybe a joint supplement … When you have a horse with a joint issue, then you typically look at joint supplements or possible injections, or if you have hoof issues, you look at hoof supplements and creative shooing. So we’re just trying to find a particular product to go after that specific problem.

John Dowdy:     The new thing with the Equinety product, it’s very easy, it’s simple, all of them get these exact same dosage, which is the one scoop. But because we’re stimulating the pituitary gland to release the hormones, the body’s deciding with pinpoint accuracy where to send those hormones for the healing. So it’s customizing to each horse.

John Dowdy:     In this case, we’re talking about four different horses. We’ve just kind of ran through each of the issues that they were having and how it helped. But what’s really unique, Rachel, and you had mentioned this to me prior to us recording the podcast, is the commonalities that … I mean, they seem to all have softer, shinier coats, their hooves are much stronger. And one of the things that you mentioned to me was, being these are performance horses, you were having to give injections. How often were you having to give injections, first of all before Equinety, and then after?

Rachel Senft:    My older horse, he’s probably [inaudible 00:14:35] done at least probably twice a year. He’s had some injuries, he tore his [inaudible 00:14:43]. I think he was like 12 when he tore his [inaudible 00:00:14:47]. He broke his leg as a four year old. He broke his [inaudible 00:14:52]. So because of those injuries, he needed a little bit more maintenance. It seems to me now that … He’s only getting in about once a year. It’s stretched longer, I guess, not an every six months thing like it used to be. That really decreased my maintenance.

John Dowdy:     Right. Then one of the other things … Well, let’s finish that off. So were the other horses having to be injected as well, or was it just mainly the older one?

Rachel Senft:    The next oldest gelding, yeah. I had to h